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Questions regarding Windows 10 System Restores


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#1 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 12:17 PM

Hi all,

After building my new computer and installing the OS/Programs last year I created a system restore point on another internal hard drive using the windows recovery tool (Settings -> Update & Security -> Recovery). I have a 500 gb Samsung SSD operating as the primary boot drive (C:)and the recovery image was saved to another internal IDE drive (E:). The image in question is a .vhdx file.

 

Here we are a year later and I want to restore the primary drive to the image that is on the E: without having to deal with a full reformat and program installation. My initial attempt was to boot into recovery (shift + click on restart) and use the restore tool to load the recovery image. Come to find out that the restore tool not only did not detect the E: drive but also had seemingly no capability of allowing me to select any other drive. In fact, it didn't detect any restore points at all and only offered the ability to search a network or scan for drivers. I chalked that up to a loss.

 

I thought that maybe if I dragged the recovery folder onto the desktop and repeated the above it would remedy the issue. It did not. After some googling I thought that maybe if I mounted the .vhdx file with Disk Manager and assigned it a drive letter that it would detect. It did not.

 

I began looking for 3rd party software and after reading countless posts that claimed Acronis True Image was the solution to all problems, I purchased it. Upon running the program I have the option to clone drives and other things but nothing that seems to allow me to image the .vhdx and install its contents to my primary C: which means I may have wasted $30. That is to say, every time I run Acronis' clone feature and use the .vdhx as the source and C: as the target it reboots, begins the process then spits back an error pop up that says "one or more of your removable disks may not have started", asks if I want to wait and if I click 'yes' it does it again. Clicking 'no' ends the process and it boots back to desktop. 

 

All I want to do is use the windows recovery image that I created to do what it was intended to do: overwrite my C: and start over without having to re-do driver/program installation.

 

After 3 hours and $30 wasted....can someone help me?


Edited by fifthmanstanding, 03 October 2016 - 12:30 PM.


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 12:47 PM

You sound like you want to do a recovery from a full system image, but what you describe doesn't sound like you took an actual full system image, but more like you set a restore point.

 

Could you clarify as to whether you used the Windows "Create a System Image" to create the thing you are trying to restore from or not?


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 01:13 PM

Last year after getting the system situated I made a system image (control panel -> backup and restore -> create system image) and made a system image of the C: at that time. I kept this image in storage on another internal drive (E:) for the purposes of reverting back to that original state using the system image. 



#4 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 01:52 PM

You should be able to create a system repair disc using the "Backup and Restore (Windows 7)" utility [the link is on that page], boot from the system repair disc, and use the system image you created to restore.

 

You may run into a problem in that the drive you used is internal.  As a general rule, most restore utilities will not look on internal drives because they're usually the very thing being restored.  This is all the more the case if you have one physical hard drive (regardless of conventional or SSD) that is partitioned into two logical drives.

 

You should have a folder, that has a special icon that looks like this:  Attached File  backup_icon.jpg   2.28KB   0 downloads

 

I would copy this off to an external drive before beginning to try to restore from it as I doubt it will find it on the internal E: drive.  Of course, you could try to see whether it does or not first.

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 cmptrgy

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:15 PM

Are you on the AU update? If you are I suspect all system restore points on drive C from the original Win10 upgrade/install are removed.

--- When you use the control panel -> backup and restore -> create system image process:

 

A System Image Restore Point: Backup is created in System Restore of drive C

---- If you are on the Win10 AU update that restore point as well as others are no longer on drive C

In drive E a WindowsImageBackup folder is created in drive E

--- Since drive E cannot be selected for some reason, you cannot reference the WindowsImageBackup folder

--- Not sure, referring back to the Win10 AU update could be a factor probably

I’m not familiar with separately working with .vhdx files

 

I have recovered a win10 "default" system image backups a couple times in which the System Image Restore Point: Backup was intact in system restore and the WindowsImageBackup folder was intact on an external HDD by having created and using a DVD-RW System Repair disc and selecting a system image.



#6 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:05 PM

You should have a folder, that has a special icon that looks like this:  attachicon.gifbackup_icon.jpg

 

I would copy this off to an external drive before beginning to try to restore from it as I doubt it will find it on the internal E: drive.  Of course, you could try to see whether it does or not first.

 

 

 

Is it possible to make this bootable via usb for cloning/copying over C: ?



#7 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:07 PM

I have recovered a win10 "default" system image backups a couple times in which the System Image Restore Point: Backup was intact in system restore and the WindowsImageBackup folder was intact on an external HDD by having created and using a DVD-RW System Repair disc and selecting a system image.

 

Would you mind outlining the process of creating a bootable system repair disc from a windows image backup? That sounds like a potentially viable alternative that may solve the problem. 



#8 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:28 PM

Disregard the above post. I created a system recovery disc and booted from it. It took me to the same menu and options as shift+ click on restart and goes through the same search for a recovery image leading to the options for searching the network or installing drivers. Seems like that option is a bust. 



#9 cmptrgy

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:47 PM

Unfortunately I know what you mean.

The reason it’s looking for a network is because your drive E cannot be selected.

The purpose of the system repair disc or the shift+ click on restart is to interact with the System Image Restore Point: Backup that is created in System Restore of drive C (but you don’t have that available) as well as the WindowsImageBackup folder on drive E (but drive E isn’t “available”. I’m not an expert on how to explain all of that in detail but that is a summary of what I’m trying to say.

Also in my case I use an external HDD for system image backups

Although an internal HDD can be cloned to I’m not sure if an internal HDD can be used for system image backups and I believe that concern has been mentioned.



#10 fifthmanstanding

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 03:54 PM

Unfortunately I know what you mean.

The reason it’s looking for a network is because your drive E cannot be selected.

The purpose of the system repair disc or the shift+ click on restart is to interact with the System Image Restore Point: Backup that is created in System Restore of drive C (but you don’t have that available) as well as the WindowsImageBackup folder on drive E (but drive E isn’t “available”. I’m not an expert on how to explain all of that in detail but that is a summary of what I’m trying to say.

Also in my case I use an external HDD for system image backups

Although an internal HDD can be cloned to I’m not sure if an internal HDD can be used for system image backups and I believe that concern has been mentioned.

 

Is it possible to move this virtual image to a USB thumb drive and make that bootable for system restore? Or is my only alternative to purchase an external enclosure, pull the drive that the virtual image is on and boot it as an external? Furthermore, is USB booting for system restore even possible?



#11 cmptrgy

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 07:03 AM

Unfortunately I don't have an answer on how to recover the .vhdx file. Maybe a local computer shop can help you






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