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What should you do before starting up a PC for the first time in 5 years?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Just_One_Question

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 11:54 PM

Hello

Are there any ​other actions that need to be taken before you boot up a computer for the first time in 5 years besides cleaning it up both internally and externally?

It's an older PC, nothing ancient though - from 2004.​

I​ would be glad to hear any helpful advice as usual. :)


Edited by hamluis, 03 October 2016 - 11:02 AM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 Havachat

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:03 AM

Mostly you would know by trying , and see if it boots.

Provided it was stored and not bumped around too much , you could Check Ram Modules reseat , check all connection leads.

 

Then it would be wise to do any Windows Updates that are available and Install.

Also ensure you have an Antivirus that is up to date.

 

Depending on the System Specs and Windows Version { Not Stated } you may be better off just Formatting and install your Operating System of Choice.

Or you could also try a Linux Version depending on your needs on this system and what you will be doing. 

 

NOTE: I Read your other Posts , So its XP Spk 3 and 512 Ram , you could update the Ram  2 - 4 Gig and try Win 7.

XP is outdated { Not Secure for Internet } https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14223/windows-xp-end-of-support


Edited by Havachat, 03 October 2016 - 02:14 AM.


#3 Just_One_Question

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:27 AM

Mostly you would know by trying , and see if it boots.

Provided it was stored and not bumped around too much , you could Check Ram Modules reseat , check all connection leads.

 

Then it would be wise to do any Windows Updates that are available and Install.

Also ensure you have an Antivirus that is up to date.

 

Depending on the System Specs and Windows Version { Not Stated } you may be better off just Formatting and install your Operating System of Choice.

Or you could also try a Linux Version depending on your needs on this system and what you will be doing. 

 

NOTE: I Read your other Posts , So its XP Spk 3 and 512 Ram , you could update the Ram  2 - 4 Gig and try Win 7.

XP is outdated { Not Secure for Internet } https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14223/windows-xp-end-of-support

Thank you for the input. It proved to be very kind and helpful​. :)



#4 hamluis

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 11:01 AM

I would probably put a new CMOS battery in it, if it fails to boot.  No battery functions properly forever without a need for recharging or replacement.

 

Louis



#5 Just_One_Question

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 02:38 PM

I would probably put a new CMOS battery in it, if it fails to boot.  No battery functions properly forever without a need for recharging or replacement.

 

Louis

 

Good thinking, I didn't remember about that! Thank you for the answer. Just one follow-up question if you don't mind:

After I buy and replace the motherboard's battery, do I need to make any new changes such as the time and what-not in the BIOS system upon booting up or should I just start up the PC after I've changed the battery and change the clock and date back to normal then? ​In short: would I need to get into BIOS after changing the battery or would that not be necessary?

Thank you once again.​



#6 cat1092

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 12:43 AM

When you boot the computer after changing CMOS battery, setting Windows Time will also set that in the BIOS. :)

 

However, if there were system settings that was changed from default, any of these are wiped out. Chances are if there are any that needs resetting, you'll know, or will soon. This is why otherwise computers has jumpers, to not perform a full reset of the computer, just what has to be. 

 

I'll go on a limb & say that if you were running a much newer computer since, one thing that cannot be fixed with a CMOS battery change, is the speed of which the PC operates. There'll be times when you'll feel frustrated, though considering it's from 2004 & boots, and otherwise was running well before storing (the 5 years not used somewhat preserves the hardware, if wrapped or boxed properly), you're doing good. 

 

You may wish to move to a newer OS for your security, however I'll leave that decision up to you. :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Just_One_Question

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 07:47 AM

When you boot the computer after changing CMOS battery, setting Windows Time will also set that in the BIOS. :)

 

However, if there were system settings that was changed from default, any of these are wiped out. Chances are if there are any that needs resetting, you'll know, or will soon. This is why otherwise computers has jumpers, to not perform a full reset of the computer, just what has to be. 

 

I'll go on a limb & say that if you were running a much newer computer since, one thing that cannot be fixed with a CMOS battery change, is the speed of which the PC operates. There'll be times when you'll feel frustrated, though considering it's from 2004 & boots, and otherwise was running well before storing (the 5 years not used somewhat preserves the hardware, if wrapped or boxed properly), you're doing good. 

 

You may wish to move to a newer OS for your security, however I'll leave that decision up to you. :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat

Thank you, this is all the information I needed. This website was very kind & helpful with me and my tech problems - Thank you, all! :)



#8 cat1092

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 01:20 AM

Just_One_Question, you're quite welcome! :)

 

Should you run across any other issues with the computer, or any other, always feel free to post, and if we were helpful, feel free to spread the good word of Bleeping Computer to others. We work hard to give our members accurate answers to their issues, and while at times there may be no right or obvious answer, in most cases there is a solution. 

 

Good Luck with the rest of the project! :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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