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Is it near time to have a paper backup plan?


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#1 HockingBob

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 12:52 PM

I've got multiple backups kept offline, I use you guys mercilessly for support when trouble strikes, I keep up to date on all my programs and try to use good coding while working for clients on websites.  While we're doing everything on our end to keep a connection and hopefully at least a spotty stream of revenue, the bad guys work tirelessly to develop a continuous evolution of stealth viruses.  Good news there is the criminal syndicates don't want to destroy you totally because - well - it makes no sense to kill the host.  They want to keep you as a future client. 

 

The Real Danger

 

I've read that certain countries have given full support and protection to the best hacker syndicates.  The governments and cyber warfare units use them kind of like our government uses our universities and research labs.  Hackers get rich, governments gain up to the moment cyber weaponry.  Of course, you guys would know all this stuff a whole lot better than me.  Anyway, with that weapon in the hands of a hostile government, they may not want you to survive.  They may want to see smoking remains.  What I fear is the development of a totally stealth virus that could be used to literally wipe everything all at one shot (or at least enough to alter cyber life as we know it). 

 

Are We There Yet?

 

Are we at the point that where businesses small and large should start looking at serious paper backup plans?  Microfiche? Computers and programs that print out in some form of paper output that could be seamlessly picked up and managed by humans with typewriters in the event of the aforementioned shtf scenario?  Just seems like we're building our castles on shifting sand.  Whereas I don't want to be a tinfoil hat loony, if something happens to the computers and the internet most businesses are dead in the water today.  And what's under attack that you guys are constantly fighting for - right - our computers and our internet.  Thank you guys for caring and for all that you do.  Comments?



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#2 ranchhand_

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:29 PM

 

Are we at the point that where businesses small and large should start looking at serious paper backup plans

Off the top of my head, impossible. The world has totally committed to digital. To attempt to go back now would create the chaos that you fear. Everything from cell phones to atomic power plants run via computers, and the word computer has actually become a generic term; there are so many specialized digital uses out there a backup would be literally impossible, even with 10,000 typists and mountains of paper. Our future? To quote Longfellow:

"I shot an arrow into the air; it fell to earth I know not where."


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#3 Animal

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:48 PM

In more simple terms I doubt there are enough trees on the planet. Or for that matter enough empty warehouse space to create and store the enormity of world wide digital data needed as a backup on 'hardcopy'....

But think of the jobs that could be created for archiving and maintaining the 'hardcopy' data base on a weekly or monthly basis...

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#4 ranchhand_

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:56 PM

To mis-quote you: In more simple terms I doubt there are enough people on the planet to archive and maintain hardcopy backups. :)


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#5 HockingBob

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 05:52 PM

I'm not talking about trying to preserve all the knowledge of the internet, just simply breaking down the most significant bare bones information needed to keep a company running.  Sales - content management system = daily handwritten reports, expense reports, etc.  Sales = carbon copy receipts, you know, just the basic stuff needed to keep a business going.  Maybe go through the content management system and print out  names, phone numbers, basic pertinent info so sales can keep going.  So you guys think I'm whacko for even thinking about this scenario?



#6 violetrose

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 06:40 PM

Always better to be safe than sorry.  :)

 

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=how+to+make+a+tinfoil+hat&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=940&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjmq9rX3LXPAhVDHpQKHfqFBDcQsAQIGg



#7 HockingBob

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 04:55 AM

Violet Rose:   :hysterical:  that was funny



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 07:12 PM

@viioletrose - some very stylish even elegant foil hats in that collection !

 

@HockingBob - that's why the use of off-line and even off-site backups are so strongly reccommended.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#9 rp88

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 07:32 PM

More wise would be a faraday cage for your backups and an emergency computer (kept permanently offline but turned on now and then to make sure it's ok from a hardware perspective) to be kept in. That way in the event of a lot of possible disasters you'd be able to get at the files again pretty fast. For further protection against viruses scan all backups with a variety of different computers (windows AND linux) each running different scanning engines, so you can be sure your backups aren't infected. Put them on something like optical discs as these shouldn't have the kind of firmware which USB sticks and external HDDs can have and which can technically (although only practically in specific circumstances FOR NOW) be infected. It's not your head that needs tinfoil coatings, but metal shielding around electronics helps keep them safe from things like solar flares.
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#10 BrockLabs

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:11 PM

There is no going back! Are you also preparing for a return to the stone age, and securing your axes and hammers?

Of course, a minimal worst-case back-up plan is most reasonable, like keeping pictures, recent financial statements, and obfuscated list of passwords.

We must work to secure our digital world and make it more robust.



#11 HockingBob

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:51 PM

Shot a letter to the editor of my local paper about this topic after I ran it by you guys.  Here it is:

 

"Do our local businesses have a paper backup plan in the event computers and data become unavailable?

The Internet has become a war zone. Businesses are being destroyed. Hackers are working tirelessly to develop devastating viruses. One example is called ransomware. When your computer becomes infected all of your files are locked. The only way you can get them back is to pay the criminals.

The trend is toward more harmful viruses that can evade anti-virus programs, hide in backups and on and on — I think it would be wise for any business person to have a fall back paper plan just in case; if only for a day, week or month.

I think every business currently depending on computers and an Internet connection should ask themselves that horrible “What if?” question. If you had to go back to paper, what would you have to have to keep things running? A hard copy list of all your customers? Rolodex's? Paper ledgers? Mail room supplies? Typewriters? Carbon copy forms? Rubber stamps?

Every business is going to be different and therefore their needs will differ, but I repeat the old adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying to abandon the Internet, I’m just saying it would be highly prudent for yourself and the livelihood of your employees to have an inexpensive “just in case” backup plan because we’re facing highly uncertain times with the Internet."






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