Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

the pros and cons of having a separate /home partition


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 paul88ks

paul88ks

  • Members
  • 1,272 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 10:36 AM

I've heard you guys talking(especially Cat) about having a separate/home partition in Linux. I have become aware through a member that you can use one /home partition across many linux installs.What are the pros and cons of doing this,and- how exactly is this accomplished during install? Thanks -Paul



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,418 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 10:53 AM

No real cons to it actually. Pros is you have one home area for all your things. So you won't have to traverse different partitions to store stuff.

 

To achieve this upon install is pretty simple. When you go to the advanced section for setting up the partitions, you would select one partition to be root (/), then you would click on the one that you won't to be home and set it as /home. Now, if it is already a /home on another install, just don't tick the box that formats it.

 

Easier to explain with pictures, but don't have access to do that at the moment. So maybe someone else will have some to post.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#3 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,272 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 11:04 AM

Is the /home partition to be thought of as a "folder" in Windows?



#4 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,418 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 11:06 AM

Sort of yes. You could equate your "Documents" folder in Windows as the "/home" in Linux. Though there is probably a bit more that is stored in /home than there is in Documents.

 

*Edit

Actually it might be more like the "Users" folder in windows.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 29 September 2016 - 11:07 AM.

OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#5 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,418 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 12:37 PM

Here we go:

 

fedora_5.png 

 

If you look at the spot were it says "mount point", you would change that to /home from /. Your first partition you would want a mount point of root, but then your second you could add as the /home. Your root partition could be pretty small as well. I usually give it like 15GB just to be on the safe side for any programs you might install.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#6 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,272 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:13 PM

Here we go:

 

fedora_5.png 

 

If you look at the spot were it says "mount point", you would change that to /home from /. Your first partition you would want a mount point of root, but then your second you could add as the /home. Your root partition could be pretty small as well. I usually give it like 15GB just to be on the safe side for any programs you might install.

I see you are using Fedora.I guess this would apply to Linux mint, as well as the Ubuntu versions? What size do you make your/home partition?


Edited by paul88ks, 29 September 2016 - 02:15 PM.


#7 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,418 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:27 PM

Yes, same thing would apply to Ubuntu and Mint (I just happened to have that Fedora screenshot hosted online already).

 

You can put the /home as big as you want it. If you have lots of music, pictures, documents, etc, you could make it 1TB if you felt like it. No limit on how big or small. 


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#8 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,613 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 02:37 PM

There are plenty of pros to having a separate /home partition and hardly any cons except having to back up your data and all that and reinstalling the OS.

As for how a separate partition works its actually more like having a secondary drive in windows than a file directory.

Its like if you had two drives in windows, one for the OS and the other you store your files onto (very common on SSD desktop setups due to limited space on SSD's)


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#9 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,272 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 04:27 PM

 

 

You can put the /home as big as you want it. If you have lots of music, pictures, documents, etc, you could make it 1TB if you felt like it. No limit on how big or small. 

Perfect! Since I am a musician,I have tons of music,albums,.mp3's,music videos,and related documents all pertaining to my business.

 

As for how a separate partition works its actually more like having a secondary drive in windows than a file directory.

Its like if you had two drives in windows, one for the OS and the other you store your files onto (very common on SSD desktop setups due to limited space on SSD's)

That's great! Since i just installed my two OS's- Win10/Ubuntu Studio on my Samsung 512 SSD,I have a 600 Gig drive that is empty.I will use it for my /home partition. That should be plenty of space to hold .wav recording files,projects,etc. as well as all my music! I also have another 160 gig drive which I havent decided on it's use yet. Probably for backups.!!!



#10 Chapi_chapo

Chapi_chapo

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:32 AM

Posted 29 September 2016 - 04:37 PM

 

I have become aware through a member that you can use one /home partition across many linux installs.

That part is a bit tricky.

 

If you use `ls -a` from your home you will see a lot of hidden files and folders.

They are configurations folders. In the case that you have different Linux installs, with different softwares and different versions of them you could have some issues with theses config files.

 

Hopes that could be useful,

 

Xavier



#11 paul88ks

paul88ks
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 1,272 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas,Texas
  • Local time:04:32 AM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 02:40 AM

 

If you use `ls -a` from your home you will see a lot of hidden files and folders.

They are configurations folders. In the case that you have different Linux installs, with different softwares and different versions of them you could have some issues with theses config files.

That's a little above my pay-grade right now- i guess I will cross that bridge when I come to it!



#12 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,401 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:07:32 PM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 04:03 AM

Hi Xavier welcome to the Linux section,  Sorry again ( You know what I mean )

 

If you use `ls -a` from your home you will see a lot of hidden files and folders.

 

In buntu you can open the home folder and use CTRL+ h to see the hidden files and folders.


Edited by NickAu, 30 September 2016 - 05:56 AM.


#13 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,987 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 05:47 AM

Another advantage if having /home of a separate drive, is that should the OS become broken & yes it happens to newbies & long term users alike,

 

Better to have one's OS alone, the same with data. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 2,613 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 06:48 AM

 

 

 

You can put the /home as big as you want it. If you have lots of music, pictures, documents, etc, you could make it 1TB if you felt like it. No limit on how big or small. 

Perfect! Since I am a musician,I have tons of music,albums,.mp3's,music videos,and related documents all pertaining to my business.

 

As for how a separate partition works its actually more like having a secondary drive in windows than a file directory.

Its like if you had two drives in windows, one for the OS and the other you store your files onto (very common on SSD desktop setups due to limited space on SSD's)

That's great! Since i just installed my two OS's- Win10/Ubuntu Studio on my Samsung 512 SSD,I have a 600 Gig drive that is empty.I will use it for my /home partition. That should be plenty of space to hold .wav recording files,projects,etc. as well as all my music! I also have another 160 gig drive which I havent decided on it's use yet. Probably for backups.!!!

 

 

Yeah that is how I do things currently, I have a SanDisk SDSSDA240G (Z32070RL) that i added about a month ago and linux is more than able to spread across multiple hard drives.


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#15 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 10:21 AM

@paul, I think what you want is a separate Storage Partition that you can access from any OS you might be using at the time.  This is different than using /home across multiple distro's.  I have not done it myself but if I remember correctly you would use an NTFS one so that Windows can use it also.

 

Using /home across multiple distro's will get you into a big mess as are new friend Xavier has pointed out.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users