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How to remove this cmos battery?


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#1 PixelsP

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 12:58 PM

I'll include the pictures below, the desktop model# is am1100-e1402a

 

I found this service manual here, couldn't seem to find anything on the battery removal or motherboard.

 

 

I can't seem to figure out to remove the cmos battery, it has a plastic housing with 4 plastic tabs holding it down, the hosing appears to be 1 piece with a slot in it for the metal tab, tried pressing the metal tab, it has no play and is being restricted by the plastic housing, also tried seeing if i could wiggle it out of the plastic housing but not enough wiggle room. Not sure if the battery is removable but found other posts of people saying they replaced theirs.

 

(not sure if the pictures would attach so i included these links just incase)

pic 1

 

pic 2

 

pic 3

 

 

Attached File  IMG_20160928_115122.jpg   94.2KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20160928_115342.jpg   113.47KB   0 downloadsAttached File  IMG_20160928_115628.jpg   130.49KB   0 downloads

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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#2 Viper_Security

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:01 PM

The little metal piece that is sticking up by the RAM slots, push that back lightly and the battery should pop out.

 

Once you push that metal tab back those 2 grips on the tab side should just slight go over the battery. 


Edited by Viper_Security, 28 September 2016 - 01:02 PM.

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#3 PixelsP

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:10 PM

Tried that, when i try to push the metal tab back to release the battery, it doesn't move because theres a plastic housing surrounding it, which traps it from moving, theirs maybe a millimeter of play on that clip.



#4 Viper_Security

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:13 PM

Use your fingers to grab on the edge of the battery and pull it up and out of the socket holding it in place while with your other hand push on that metal tab. 

 

you kind of have to slide it forward/back and up.


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#5 hamluis

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:18 PM

I push the tab back, then push down on the CMOS battery edge farthest from the tab...which forces the edge closest to the tab up where I can grasp it.  Or vice versa...key thing is to push down on one side and grasp the other side of the CMOS battery.

 

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#6 PixelsP

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:25 PM

I can't seem to find any wiggle room on it anywhere for the standard removal methods. Could it be possible that the whole plastic housing gets removed first? there's a slit in the plastic housing for the metal tab which makes it look like the battery was installed first, then the plastic housing seated it.



#7 Viper_Security

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:26 PM

I can't seem to find any wiggle room on it anywhere for the standard removal methods. Could it be possible that the whole plastic housing gets removed first? there's a slit in the plastic housing for the metal tab which makes it look like the battery was installed first, then the plastic housing seated it.

i doubt it because the metal under the housing is normally soldered onto the board, but it could be.


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#8 Platypus

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 05:01 PM

That's a design I don't like, it depends on being able to bend the plastic. You'll need to use something like a fine flat bladed screwdriver to lever the battery past the plastic tabs by springing them outwards. It will probably work best just inside the tabs opposite the metal contact clip. Because those two tabs are at the ends of the plastic "wall" they usually have a little more flex than the opposite side.

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#9 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 07:48 AM

I usually employ the same method as Loius, i.e., pressing down on one side, while levering up & out on the other. Works for me.

 

 

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#10 hugeB

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 10:48 PM

There are several videos in Youtube you can refer to.

#11 cat1092

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 03:34 AM

I usually employ the same method as Loius, i.e., pressing down on one side, while levering up & out on the other. Works for me.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:

 

Same here, use a tiny screwdriver or pair of tweezers to grab the battery. Just be easy & patient, and you'll get it done. :)

 

Don't apply excessive force to the component. I don't like this style of CMOS battery holder either, yet run across one here & there, and deal with it. All were able to be removed/replaced within 2-3 minutes (except the first one). 

 

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#12 tutorversal

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 05:37 AM

With some computers, you may need to disconnect cables, remove drives, or remove other parts of the computer to get full access to the CMOS battery.



#13 cat1092

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 01:12 AM

With some computers, you may need to disconnect cables, remove drives, or remove other parts of the computer to get full access to the CMOS battery.

 

You're right, in some, there are & this is true. :)

 

However, given the pictures the OP has posted, the only component that appears in the way is one RAM module that's easily removed, unless there's an obstacle unseen those provided (image #3 looks to be the best shot to work from, towards the CPU, IMO). That said, one with small to mid-size hands may have better access to these areas than one with very large ones in tight spots, though there are tools that can be used to give a gentle assist when/if needed, such as plastic ones made to separate areas. Or even a pair of tweezers with ceramic tips can help if the person can get one side moved over (this also prevents static from getting to the battery's center post underneath). Or pliers wrapped with electrical tape to prevent damage. It may be that the wide area in #3 is the best shot after a second look, as I thought all along. 

 

If needed, cables & drives can be disconnected & removed, these are often easy to remove & required for many operations, yet unless there's more there than meets the eye (no large pic included), I'm not going to assume that there's a further obstacle until I see that there is one. :)

 

Thanks for your input! :)

 

Cat


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