Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Pros and cons Linux & Windows


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64

  • Members
  • 810 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:13 PM

Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:11 PM

I like to have a discussion about the pros and cons between Linux & Windows. Example: Pros Linux has far less malware for it than Windows. Pros Windows has far more games available for it. Please share your experiences with Linux & Windows and pros and cons.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Guest_hollowface_*

Guest_hollowface_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 28 September 2016 - 12:46 AM

By default Linux uses mount points. Window can too, but it doesn't by default, and some applications don't like it when you use them. I greatly prefer mount points to letters. So that's a pro for Linux.

 

A pro for Windows would be that it's much easier to mount a parition and access the contents than it is under Linux.

 

Most linux distros make it as easy as they can for you to get an ISO. Microsoft has historically made it really hard. With Windows 10 they have been offering an ISO, but you have to use an unsupported OS just to access the download for it, or use the media creation tool. So that's another pro for Linux, and con for Windows.

 

Software is often easier to install on Windows, and packages tend to be all inclusive. On Linux packages tend to be individualized, and managers are required to figure out what you need, and to get it all installed. This makes it much more difficult to download applications to install on another computer, or to backup for the future.



#3 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 12,360 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia

Posted 28 September 2016 - 02:41 AM

 

Software is often easier to install on Windows,

Riskier too. Downloading 3rd party Windows software is like a box of chocolates, You never know what you will get.


Edited by NickAu, 28 September 2016 - 02:42 AM.


#4 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 810 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:04:13 AM

Posted 30 September 2016 - 10:13 PM

 

 

Software is often easier to install on Windows,

Riskier too. Downloading 3rd party Windows software is like a box of chocolates, You never know what you will get.

 

Yeah I think I got some adware infections in the past from trying different freeware apps.



#5 Captain_Chicken

Captain_Chicken

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,347 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:13 PM

Posted 01 October 2016 - 08:43 PM

Pro for linux: Runs well on older machines, free and open source.

Pro for windows: Generally universal, more program support and familiar most users.


Computer Collection:

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

#6 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 810 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:13 PM

Posted 11 October 2016 - 11:42 PM

Speaking of Ubuntu Captain_Chicken I've heard that Ubuntu 16.04 has some issues with certain wireless cards. Thats diffidently a con. 



#7 Captain_Chicken

Captain_Chicken

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,347 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:13 PM

Posted 12 October 2016 - 09:37 AM

Speaking of Ubuntu Captain_Chicken I've heard that Ubuntu 16.04 has some issues with certain wireless cards. Thats diffidently a con.

I haven't had any issues here with them. Upgrading from 14.04 to 16.04 fixed wireless issues on an old laptop.
I'm going to add a pro to Linux I have noticed: easier printing. We have a network HP Envy 7640 and I haven't any issues on Linux, but when Windows machines try to print there is always a good amount of troubleshooting, driver downloads and restarts.

Computer Collection:

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

#8 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,163 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:02:13 PM

Posted 12 October 2016 - 10:37 AM

Since you mention printing, my experience is not the same. While I haven't had any problems printing in Linux, or Windows for that matter, my Epson DX5050 printer/scanner requires the printer, scanner and ink level reader to be set up separately in Linux. While many modern Linux operating systems have an "add printer" facility, which makes installing a driver as easy as selecting the printer from a list, finding the correct driver for the scanner wasn't quite as simple. Then more research and software was required to read the ink levels.

Whereas to set up the printer/scanner/ink level reader in Windows, I put the CD that came with it in the drive, and follow the on-screen instructions.

When using the printer in Windows, ink levels are displayed automatically each time. To read the ink levels in Linux, I not only have to run a separate application, but I have to run it as root! (root in Linux is ~equivalent to admin in Windows).

So there's a pro for Windows from a Linux enthusiast. :)

Edited by Al1000, 12 October 2016 - 10:40 AM.


#9 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,937 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:07:13 PM

Posted 16 October 2016 - 05:09 PM

The key "con" for linux is that you have to install it yourself and this can be a bit scary to do when you first try it on a machine where you are not sure whether it will handle linux ok, especially with the menace of secureboot and such. But otherwise linux seems a much better choice these days than windows 10 does, primarily because linux leaves you in control of your system.
Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,589 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:13 PM

Posted 17 October 2016 - 05:49 PM

A pro for Windows would be that it's much easier to mount a parition and access the contents than it is under Linux.

I never ran into this issue. In fact I have helped posters on BC that were able to mount partitions in Linux that failed in Windows. 

 

Big Linux pros for me are the ability to create a separate home partition, no registry, and compared to the nightmare of updating Windows 7 recently, Ubuntu's updates just work.



#11 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 6,209 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:02:13 PM

Posted 17 October 2016 - 06:00 PM

@ rp88  #9

 

Installing it yourself is not such a 'con' if you advise a beginner to go with something like Mint or Ubuntu. Download the ISO, burn to DVD or USB and run, and that's about it for the essentials. After all, there are plenty of Windows non-gurus who have had to lay their hands on a Windows installer to do a re-install. And as JohnC has just said you do not get the grief - at least I've never had any - doing Linux updates that I have had with Windows ones.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#12 JohnnyJammer

JohnnyJammer

  • Members
  • 1,114 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:QLD Australia
  • Local time:07:13 PM

Posted 18 October 2016 - 06:43 PM

I use Windows but Win10 for gaming, besides that its all server work in 2008 R2. Proxy is Squid (Unix)

People dont realize how powerful windows can be when its used correctly and i can do what ever a unix person can do in windows using batch or powershell as they do bash.

The best thing for me is remotely configuring PC's with out having to be at the seat, automation is another feature i love about windows but that comes with a downside as well.

 

In the end it comes down to what you need a computer to do or an operating system to do because they are 2 different things.


Edited by JohnnyJammer, 18 October 2016 - 06:44 PM.


#13 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 7,163 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:04:13 AM

Posted 20 October 2016 - 09:26 AM

A pro for Linux is that there's less maintenance.
  • There's generally no need to defragment Linux file systems, because they don't become nearly as fragmented as Windows file systems do.
  • With Linux, there's no need to update applications separately from the operating system. As well as the system being updated, all the software (installed from Linux centralised software repositories) is updated automatically too. So for example if you use Firefox, and Mozilla brings out a new version, it will be downloaded and installed automatically when you update the operating system.
  • Because the chances of being infected with malware are considerably reduced with Linux, probably the large majority of Linux users do not regularly scan their systems for malware, or research/install anti-virus software etc.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users