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BACK UP AND DISK IMAGE


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#1 Bull6791

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:29 PM

I have a few questions that I would like answered.
1. What is disk image. What is a regular file back.
2. When would you want to do a disk image and when would you want to do a regular file back up.
3. What would be a good schedule to do file back up and disk imaging.
Thanks.

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#2 smax013

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:35 PM

I have a few questions that I would like answered.
1. What is disk image. What is a regular file back.


Disk imaging is a backup process that creates an exact duplicate of your disk in a file. The backup will contain the OS, any installed programs on that disk, users settings, and any user files on that disk. Restoring the disk image will basically put the computer back to exactly how it was when you created the disk image.

A regular file back is typically just a backup of your user files. No OS and no applications.

2. When would you want to do a disk image and when would you want to do a regular file back up.


You would do a disk image backup if you want to backup your computer such that you can restore the computer exactly to how it was when you made the backup image. So, in essence, you would do a disk image backup if you wanted to backup the OS, applications, user settings, and user files.

A regular file backup is done when you want to backup just user files, whether all of them or just some of time (such as backing up just pictures, but maybe not Word files as the Word files are not that important maybe). If you have all of your OS install/recover discs and your programs install discs, then you only really need to backup your user files as they are the files you cannot replace (the OS and programs can be "replaced" in this situation by using the install discs).

3. What would be a good schedule to do file back up and disk imaging.
Thanks.


This kind of depends on what your overall backup plan is going to be as well as how often you "create" new user files. And it also depends on how critical your user files are to you and how paranoid you are about losing your files.

For example, you could do just one backup. In this case, you likely would want to do a differential or incremental disk image backup. And if you are regularly creating or changing your user files, then you likely would want to update the disk image backup maybe daily if the files re really important.

Another option is to do two backups. One is a disk image backup that you only update with you install new programs or maybe when you update Windows and/or programs. So, this backup might be roughly monthly or maybe longer. Then the second backup would be just to backup your user files. This might be done daily or weekly depending on how important the files are and how often you change them or create new user files.

If you have really critical files, you might decide to backup those files hourly.

So, generally speaking, for files that cannot be replaced and are critical, you will tend to want to back them up more frequently. For files that can be replaced (such as OS or programs), then you don't need to back them up very often.

#3 Bull6791

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 02:25 AM

How do you do a disk imaging.
How do you do a file back up.

#4 smax013

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:19 PM

How do you do a disk imaging.


You use a backup program that will do a disk image backup. There are lots of such programs. Personally, I use Acronis True Image, which is not free. There are free programs like Macrium Free.
 

How do you do a file back up.


You can either do it "manually" (i.e. just copy a file or files from one location to a second drive using Windows normal copy function) or use a backup program.

#5 Bull6791

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 01:25 PM

Smax013
To back up files do you do it manually or use a backup program.
Thanks.

#6 Bull6791

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 06:39 AM

Smax013: what is the difference between cloning and disk imaging or they are the same.

#7 smax013

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 08:31 PM

Smax013: what is the difference between cloning and disk imaging or they are the same.


Cloning is an direct exact copy of a drive to another with no intermediate steps that will result in a second drive that is exactly the same as the first drive. If the original drive was bootable, then the new drive will be bootable as well. Typically you will need the new drive to be of the same size or larger than the original drive, but some cloning programs can clone from a larger drive to a smaller drive IF the amount of data on the larger drive is not greater than the size of the smaller drive. Cloning is typically used when one want to install a new, larger capacity drive in a computer, but it can be used for other reasons.

Imaging is creating a copy of a drive to a file on a second drive. You can then use that image file to restore the exact configuration of the original drive to a third drive. So, it is kind of an indirect method of cloning a drive that typically involves three drives: the original drive, a storage drive when the image file is stored, and a new drive.

#8 cafejose

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 01:03 AM

Not sure if needing a new topic or not -

 

In case a user needs to restore from a image backup, does he need to change things in computers settings or boot settings or bios eufi settings, like to not let the computer interfere with recovery or internal disk rescue?



#9 RolandJS

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 03:13 PM

...In case a user needs to restore from a image backup, does he need to change things in computers settings or boot settings or bios eufi settings, like to not let the computer interfere with recovery or internal disk rescue?

UEFI computers often have to be tweaked to allow usb or cd/dvd booting; others familiar with UEFI can help you with the settings.  I think: Secure Boot must be turned off; something has to be set to Legacy; perhaps Fast Boot is best turned off; & so on.  I think all that is needed for BIOS computers is have set the boot device order, I turned off Fast Boot in mine so that a more complete hardware check is made during Post. 


Edited by RolandJS, 05 October 2016 - 03:14 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#10 Bull6791

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 08:07 PM

What is the best way to do a disk imaging.
Use a external hard drive and put images on that. Should the external hard drive be partitioned.
I just want to know what is the best way to do disk imaging.
Thanks

#11 RolandJS

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 08:44 PM

BleepingComputer's Tutorials section has excellent threads concerning backup/restore, full imaging, usage of available and trusted external media.

[10-09: After re-reading post #10, I removed my earlier software and hardware comments.]


Edited by RolandJS, 09 October 2016 - 06:20 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#12 RolandJS

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Posted 08 October 2016 - 10:08 PM

Here is one example of an excellent walk-through!

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/616536/creating-a-windows-backup-image/

This very thorough thread covers using Windows' built-in backup/restore, it does not cover usage of a 3rd party backup/restore program.

[10-09, updated my comment after re-reading post #10.]

 

Post #10 snippit:

"What is the best way to do a disk imaging. Use a external hard drive and put images on that. Should the external hard drive be partitioned..."

According to many, the best way is using a 3rd party backup/restore program such as Macrium Reflect, Image for Windows, or any other program from a large pool of both free and pay-for programs.

The external hard-drive should be prepped, ie, NTFS formatted, not marked Active.  Whether partitioned into more than one partition, I personally did not, however, let's see what others have to say   :)

 

One thing to consider when purchasing an external hard-drive for backup/restore purposes:

If you purchase a hard-drive with on-board/circuit-level encryption, to me, IMO, that can be a whole different matter than buying a hard-drive that does not contain such built-in encryption, again, that's just my opinion based on what I have especially read on sevenforums.com, the few threads involving built-in encryption hard-drives.


Edited by RolandJS, 09 October 2016 - 06:21 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#13 MDD1963

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 06:12 PM

Macrium Reflect seemed remarkably easy to use...

 

Installed free version of Macrium reflect, created image of mutipartition/multiboot (Win10/Ubuntu)-configured SSD, stored image to external 3 TB USB drive (50GB of actual data used took 16 min), created USB flash drive with WinPE based rescue media, replaced SSD with old 500 gb 5400 rpm drive for testing, restored image..., tested Win10 and Ubuntu, both still worked fine.

 

reflect_main_window.jpg


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#14 Bull6791

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 06:42 PM

DISK imaging: what is the difference between making a disk image with window7 vs using macrium reflect.
Thanks

#15 MDD1963

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 09:11 PM

They essentially accomplish the same thing...

 

Not sure Windows' integrated imaging capabilities can properly read/copy/image my Ubuntu (ext3) partition....

 

(Some of my reading said Windows Backup can only handle NTFS/FAT partitions, so, this would not be suitable for my multiboot config. Tested Macrium with my multi-boot configured laptop yesterday, however, , worked great)

 

The built-in imaging capabilities might be fine for most Windows only rigs, however.


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060





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