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How to dual boot Windows and Ubuntu (and pros and cons?)


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#1 liv11647

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 11:12 PM

Hi there everyone, I've recently been successful in testing out Ubuntu by booting from a flash drive, and would like to know: a- the pros and cons of dual booting with windows, and b- how I can do this. If dual boot seems to be too difficult or not worth it, I have an older machine that I can use to solely run Ubuntu. Thanks in advance! :)


Edited by liv11647, 26 September 2016 - 11:35 PM.


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#2 paul88ks

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 11:46 PM

Dual booting is a great option. It's not difficult to do,and many of us here on BC Dual-boot or have multiple OS's installed. What two operating systems are you wanting to set up?And what are the specs on your PC?


Edited by paul88ks, 26 September 2016 - 11:46 PM.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 01:09 AM

 

the pros and cons of dual booting with windows,

The pro is you can have 2 operating systems, there are no cons.

 

 

 how I can do this. If dual boot seems to be too difficult or not worth it

What version of Windows are you running?

 

 

I have an older machine that I can use to solely run Ubuntu.

Can you tell us about this machine,

Processor

Ram

HDD size

Video card if any.

 

IMO if you have a second machine I wouldn't bother with dual booting for now, Its easier to install Linux on this pc rather than dual boot.



#4 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 04:22 AM

I agree with Nick.

 

Nearly any 'flavour' of Linux will work with an older machine, where a newer version of Windows almost certainly will have problems, ranging from mild to crippling (depending on hardware).

 

If you can supply us with the information Nick has requested, we'll then be in a better position to advise as to which Linux distro would be best for your particular hardware. There's quite a few to choose from, y'see.....  :P

 

Where multiple machines are available for use, it's better for novices to keep Windows & Linux separate in the early stages. Makes things simpler all round for everybody. When you've gained some experience and proficiency with Linux, you'll then be in a better position to decide for yourself just how you want to install stuff on your various computers.

 

There will always be somebody around to offer advice..!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 September 2016 - 04:27 AM.

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#5 Jeremy_C

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 08:03 AM

Finally, the rookie gets to offer some insight on Linux!!! :thumbup2:

 

It's not hard to setup the dual-boot environment. Just starting the Install procedure (which doesn't actually install until you've clicked the warning window that pops up after some setup questions are answered) should show you right away if that is an option. If it is an option, you'll see right away what opportunities you have for a dual-boot setup.

 

I am fairly new to Linux and I setup dual-boot last week just because the option was there. I had no idea when I set out to do the install that an option would pop up offering me that choice. I planned on nuking Windows anyway so there was no gamble involved. It took about a minute to answer some questions and then it was off and running. When the machine restarted I was presented with a text-based menu on the screen asking me if I wanted to start Windows or Linux. That menu comes up every time you turn the machine off/on or restart it.

 

I booted into Windows, and other than my hard drive appearing a little smaller because I had to give some space to Linux, there was no noticeable difference whatsoever. I even ran some benchmarking and performance software because I was really curious - this just seemed too god to be true. But Windows never even noticed that I had installed Linux.

 

I also booted into Linux, and things ran as smooth as could be.

 

It really is a great option to have and I think it was just one of the coolest things I had done with a computer in a long time.

 

Best of luck with your Linux adventure!

 

.

 

Oh yeah... Of all the Linux places out on the web, this is (without fail) THE place for Linux noobs to ask questions and learn. These are some seriously knowledgeable and experienced people that are willing to help anyone. So keep asking questions! (I owe Gary a huge debt for sending me over here!)


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#6 liv11647

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 09:28 AM

Thank you guys for all of your suggestions! I think I'm going to stick with the older machine for now. By "Older", I mean like 4 or 5 years old. It's running Windows 8, on 8 (?) gigs of ram and a 250GB HDD, with a Dual Core AMD E2 Vision series processor. The only problem with this machine is that it was a hand-me-down, and the previous owner misplaced the entire back cover of the case. I have no idea what to do about this, or if I can just let it run like that, or if I'm just totally screwed. :\  

 

(I'm attaching a picture because while I would like to run linux on this machine, I just don't know if it's possible considering this little detail...)

 

Attached File  who thought this was a good idea.jpg   8.62KB   1 downloads


Edited by liv11647, 27 September 2016 - 09:30 AM.


#7 liv11647

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 09:36 AM

Oh, and in response to paul88ks earlier- I was trying to run a Linux distro (most likely Ubuntu) alongside my current Windows 10. I've got a 1TB HDD, 6 gigs of ram, an AMD A6 processor with integrated graphics (which I've been trying to upgrade, but that's another post for another place ;) ) Of course, this is probably only going to be an option after I've ruled out the other machine as a viable option. :)



#8 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:41 AM

Would you happen to know what make, model, etc, the older machine is? (It's gonna be a wee bit awkward, I admit, since all those details are usually on a sticker on the back cover of the machine...)  :rolleyes:

 

Actually, upon examining the picture a bit more closely, it appears to be just one of the easy-access covers that's missing.....usually for accessing the RAM, HDD, etc.

 

@Jeremy_C:- 

 

But Windows never even noticed that I had installed Linux.

 

 

 

You were lucky. I did the same thing on a family member's machine (running Win 7), and it, too, never took any notice of Linux. This was, however, with legacy (MBR) BIOS. In many cases after installing Linux, people often find that Windows then refuses to boot, because GRUB has overwritten the Windows bootloader.....

 

In the early days of 14.04 (Trusty Tahr), they had a spell where the Ubuntu installer was actually wiping Windows right off the HDD when the 'dual-boot' option was selected. It wasn't all that long ago, either...

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 September 2016 - 10:56 AM.

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#9 liv11647

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:53 AM

It is a Samsung np355e5c. And yeah it looks like only the HDD and RAM are exposed. All of the labels and stuff are still there, as well as the other two quick-access covers.

#10 paul88ks

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 12:43 PM

I do NOT recommend that you install Linux alongside Windows, doing that will sometimes mess up your Windows installation. It did for me. Any way you will have several options on the install page - you want to pick the one that says" Try something else" then you will create a partition for Linux.Actually,2 partions.One for Linux,and one small partition for a "swap" file. It's not difficult,but you have to follow some certain steps to install Linux,which we will be glad to help you with. I have done this many times,and have never had a problem.



#11 paul88ks

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 12:48 PM

Also,since it is a Samsung,It may not let you install Linux at all. Samsung has a reputation for "bricking" their motherboards ,to where they will only run Windows. I have one that is an AIO touch screen,and it WILL NOT even boot a LIVE Linux distro.



#12 liv11647

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 01:13 PM

Also,since it is a Samsung,It may not let you install Linux at all.

 

Wonderful  :rolleyes: ...well I also have an ancient Toshiba Satellite, as well as a newer one, both of which I'm willing to completely wipe if I need to :)

would  that work?



#13 paul88ks

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 02:10 PM

Yes- you shouldn't have any issues installing Linux with that one! Which Linux distro are you installing? It may create the "swap" file automatically!


Edited by paul88ks, 27 September 2016 - 02:12 PM.


#14 paul88ks

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 02:14 PM

I would suggest Ubuntu- or Ubuntu Mate- which is very user friendly! Great for older laptops!



#15 MadmanRB

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 03:51 PM

The only issue i see with dual booting is with newer computers with UEFI and there are a few drawbacks to windows itself like having less hard drive space and perhaps even slowdown to windows.

But that is really the only things wrong here


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