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Photo

Color Differences


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#1 TheAlexGnan

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 03:41 PM

Hey guys,

 

The circumstances: I am editing RAW files shot with my Nikon D7100 in the Raw converter of Photoshop CC (newest version). And although I obviously dont print every picture i edit, arriving at printable quality is the goal.

 

My question concerns color, hue as well as saturation. Even more advanced photo labs for high quality prints only accept jpg files. The issue is the OBIVOUS difference I can make out with the naked eye when looking at an edited picture, opened in photoshop side by side with the saved jpg i want to upload to have it printed.

 

In photoshop the colors (especially red) look a tad brighter, more saturated and a bit warmer than in the saved jpg.

 

I admit I am not and expert on color settings, but I am working with rgb color settings throughout the process (shooting, editing, saving, printing).

 

The problem: how am I ever supposed to accurately edit a picture when the result I see in Photoshop vastly differs from the jpg I print? Will the result be closer to what I see in photoshop or what i see when looknig at the jpg in a windos photo viewer?

 

PS: My monitor is not the problem, its close to 100% color true, and besides, you would spot the difference on any monitor.

 

thanx in advance

regards



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#2 Viper_Security

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 04:24 PM

Are you using CMYK or RGB in Photoshop? and if your monitor is VGA it's RGB, for more vibrant and "clear" colors use CMYK (Cyan Magenta Yellow and Black) instead of RGB (Red, Green, Blue)

 

 

to get the best CMYK colors you'd need a DVI or HDMI monitor.


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#3 TheAlexGnan

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 05:03 PM

I am familiar with CMYK but...

 

I am struggling to understand why this worked, but I changed the color profile to CMYK and now the saved jpg's file size is about twice as large and both color and contrast are displayed 100% accurate in the jpg as far as i can tell.

 

Could you maybe explain to me in a few short words why this might be the case?

 

anyway, thanks already, I've been pondering this problem a while.

 

Followup: Now that I have saved the jpg with CMYK, could it become a problem when printing? Is the CMYK profile represented in the jpg file so an RGB printer might have difficulties reproducing them from the file?

                 Really grasping at straws in a horribly uninformed way, but hey...

 

thx again



#4 Viper_Security

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 05:27 PM

The files size is most likely bigger because you are using more color combinations than you would with RGB, which is why the colors look "right" now. and yes the printer may cause issues as well (most likely not unless your printer is 10+ years old and uses separate color cartridges.)i believe on industrial printers the fuser acts differently than it would on a normal/toner printer.  

 

Also the paper you are printing on plays a part too, the colors will look brighter on a 8.5x11 90lb gloss than it would on a 8.5x11 70-80lb matte (regular paper).

 

The printer could be a problem and it could not be. the only true way to tell is to print 2 samples and compare them. 


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#5 TheAlexGnan

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 05:51 PM

makes sense!

 

It seems like a ton of information got lost in the process of saving a jpg from the psd file...

 

jup doing samples is a good idea. My print store allows for 2 free test prints if I end up buying a large one (120x80cm ususally). Absurdly enough, I used to "overedit" pics in photoshop (a tad to saturated, a tad to much contrast) so the print would be just right. but thats no way to really get there. If all goes well, you just ended those days of imprecision.

 

The printer meets professional standards and I'm savy on paper types as well, so that should work out.

 

Thanks a bunch for your help, I appreciate it.



#6 Viper_Security

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 06:46 PM

No Problem! Good Luck in your endeavors!


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