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Mac OS Sierra


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7 replies to this topic

#1 azisel

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 08:49 AM

Hi Everyone!

 

Anybody here is using the new Mac OS Sierra? If so, Any bugs? or problems at all? Any disadvantages? 

 

What worries me is that it might cause my softwares not to work and will not recognize my hardware like SSD or Max RAM.

 

 

My current specs:

 

2s6ufr8.png



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#2 Gorbulan

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 10:29 AM

Why wouldn't it recognize your SSD or RAM?



#3 smax013

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Posted 22 September 2016 - 05:57 PM

Hi Everyone!
 
Anybody here is using the new Mac OS Sierra? If so, Any bugs? or problems at all? Any disadvantages? 
 
What worries me is that it might cause my softwares not to work and will not recognize my hardware like SSD or Max RAM.
 
 
My current specs:
 
2s6ufr8.png


While it is always possible for bugs to occurs in major upgrades to the macOS, it will almost never have any issues with recognizing things like your SSD or max RAM. Beside the possibility of unexpected bugs, the main potential issue with a major upgrade is incompatibility with some software programs. Typically, however, software programs that might have issues with a new macOS major upgrade are more "low level" stuff like utilities. Your more main stream "productivity" or general applications (such a Microsoft Office, major games, Photoshop, etc) will not have any major issues with new versions of the macOS. It will be more applications like iStat Menus, SuperDuper, etc that might have some compatibility issues with a new version of the macOS. BUT...most of those types of programs will typically issue updates to make them work fine with the new version of macOS prior to the new version coming out or just after the new version comes out. After all, they tend to have at several months with at a beta version of the new macOS prior to it being released to start working on updates.

So, generally speaking, you likely will have no major issue with upgrading to Sierra if you wanted to do so now. If there was any major issue, there would have been tons of news reports by now (like there was about the iOS 10 WiFi upgrade download bricking some people's iPhones last week). You likely will have no issues at all other than maybe getting used to the new features. There is a chance that there might be some minor bugs. If you are worried about minor bugs (or some thing worse), then just wait a while until Apple releases the first patch. Personally, I tend to wait a little bit to let Apple work out some of the kinks they may have...or as I also put it: "Let other people be Apple's test dummies".

#4 techphobe

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 05:51 AM

Was going to ask this.Assuming there are no security implications to not updating I reckon I'll leave it for, um..... a year?  :lol:

And always back up before you update.


Edited by techphobe, 06 October 2016 - 05:54 AM.


#5 smax013

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 09:18 AM

Was going to ask this.Assuming there are no security implications to not updating I reckon I'll leave it for, um..... a year?  :lol:


Apple will tend to release security updates for the previous two versions of the macOS when they release a new version. So, in theory, Apple will keep doing security updates for 10.11.x and 10.10.x until 10.13.x (or whatever the next version number will be after Sierra, aka 10.12.x). At that time, they likely will drop support for 10.10.x.

This is different than iOS. For iOS, if your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch can run the latest version (currently iOS 10), then you will no longer be able to get bug/security updates for previous version on that device(s) UNLESS you update to the most current version (i.e. iOS 10). Apple will occasionally release a security update for an older version of iOS for those devices that cannot be upgraded to the latest version.

And always back up before you update.


Seconded.

Personally, I do an update of my clone of my boot drive prior to doing a major OS upgrade (whether macOS or Windows) so that I can restore my setup to the old version very easily if there are any problems with the new version.

#6 Enidtoo

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 08:39 PM

Sierra is torture.  My MAC is now unstable.  It freezes all the time.  If I am on a page, it suddenly brings me to a page before this one. I could go on and on.  I wish I had never downloaded it.



#7 Genex17

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 02:51 AM

I just got a used Mid 2012 MBP and installed a Crucial 525 GB SSD and bumped up the ram to 16 GB

 

I've got it on 10.11.6  I won't go to Sierra because of complaints with Adobe software. 10.11 is very stable. If it's not broke, don't fix it.

 

From a Windows beta tester. We do well to heed his advice.

 

"Conscientious folks who need critical things to keep working don't just change out a working OS and complain to application makers that their having done so breaks their applications.  They test, they research.  THEN they migrate when it's safe to do so."

 

If you got a spare Mac, then experiment away.

 

Gene
 


Edited by Genex17, 11 December 2016 - 02:53 AM.


#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 11:28 AM

I have seen issues with Sierra running on older Macs. While Apple says Sierra will run on Macbook Pros from 2010 or later, my experience is the older the hardware, the greater the possibilities for performance issues. In addition, how many other OS versions have run on that Macbook? Those came out when Lion (10.7) was the most up-to-date OS, so I assume it's gone through more than a few upgrades. Also, how mush free space was on the hard drive when you did the upgrade?

 

If you really want Sierra, you could do a Time Machine backup, wipe the drive, install Sierra and then restore your files. Probably more trouble than it's worth though.






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