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Struggling to be a responsible parent


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Madcapmagician

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 09:21 PM

Part of our strategy to do the right thing for our teenage offspring is to try and limit the amount of time they spend glued to the computer screen playing online games etc. We've tried parental management functions in our router to put time limits on IP leases but it turns out our isp has disabled those functions in the router. So I've tried setting up user accounts with password access. Waste of time because a 2 second search of Google finds 15 ways to circumvent account passwords. I know there must be a way to lock it down so the devious little blighters can't discover the passwords. I also want to know how to block access to a certain IP address so they can't log in to the router and find or change the Wi-Fi password. Can somebody give me some pointers at all?

Thanks in advance
Pete


Edited by hamluis, 10 September 2016 - 07:00 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking - Hamluis.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 09:38 PM

K9 parental control

 

  • Block web sites in more than 70 categories, including pornography, gambling, drugs, violence/hate/racism, malware/spyware, phishing
  • Force SafeSearch on all major search engines
  • Set time restrictions to block web access during designated times
  • Configure custom lists for "always allow" and "always block"
  • Override a web page block with password
  • Trust the enhanced anti-tampering, even children can't break
  • View easy reports to monitor and control web activity
  • Real-time categorization of new adult and malicious sites
  • Best free parental controls software/internet filter available
  • Compatible with Windows or Mac machines

Edit: Or use Windows 7 parental controls.  The parental controls do not have a setting for time restrictions on internet access. It only restricts time the computer can be used.


Edited by JohnC_21, 09 September 2016 - 09:48 PM.


#3 Madcapmagician

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 11:26 PM

Thanks John. Does this prevent an f8 boot into safe mode with command prompt and run netuser and other similar strategies? Can it stop booting from a USB image as well? I think I need this kind of control.

#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 07:13 AM

I think it does as long as the person you are trying to limit computer access has a User account and not an admin account. When entering Safe mode they would only be able to access their own account as long as everybody with an admin account has a password. You need admin privileges to add a user.

 

It cannot stop booting from a USB image unless you specifically change the boot order in you UEFI/BIOS settings to have the hard drive as the first boot device and then add a UEFI/BIOS password. This or course would prevent you booting from a CD/DVD as well.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/186235/how-to-secure-your-computer-with-a-bios-or-uefi-password/

 

You can set the password to have it required when changing settings or before accessing Windows.


Edited by JohnC_21, 10 September 2016 - 07:15 AM.


#5 Trikein

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 08:33 AM

Just be aware that you are at war with puberty and in the history of that war, very few parents have won.  :lmao:  What you don't want is a escalating of arms with you restricting something, them getting around it, you restricting it more, and so on. I find observing instead of blocking is more useful. IE have their allowances be based on how much time they put into video games that week and if you have more then 1 child, you can even get them to watchdog each other. 



#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 10:58 PM

I agree with all of the above posts. In my opinion if your kids continue to try and bypass internet restrictions then the consequences for bypassing the restrictions arent harsh enough. Play by the rules or don't play at all :)

Edited by Sneakycyber, 18 September 2016 - 10:58 PM.

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#7 smax013

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 05:37 PM

What kind of devices?

 

For more "global" options (i.e. rather than parental controls either built into the OS or by a third party application) on the devices themselves), there are router settings (which currently don't sound like an option) or a couple others below).

 

I don't know how well it works, but you could look at using OpenDNS for at least the website filtering side of things. I don't believe it sets time limits, however.

Another options if the devices are iOS devices is Intego's Family Protector. Again, I don't know how well it works.

 

You could also consider adding in a third party router that has parental controls AFTER the ISP router/gateway.  Then you have them connect to the third party router and if possible disable WiFi on the ISP router (this is what I do, but I don't have kids...I do it because the WiFi access point in my ISP gateway sucks).

 

Then there are the parental controls built into the devices themselves or by third parties.

 

Beyond that, it sounds like you will have to try non-tech solutions...i.e. if they change the WiFi password, etc without your permission, then they lose their devices for X number of hours/days/weeks.  At the end of the day, no tech solution is perfect, so you are going to have to also employ more good old fashioned parenting type skills (which admittedly I have ZERO experience with, unless you count my dog...but he has never tried to change the WiFi password :grinner: ).



#8 Wand3r3r

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 08:26 PM

I have two successfully launched children.  They in their late 20's now.  I would consider my wife and I successful parents.

 

Make a long story short, router limits and schedules are great first steps.  But you wan to know the real kicker?  You need to physically secure the modem and router.  Mine were smart enough to connect directly to the modem OR reset the router to factory so they could get on.

 

Sure they got grounded, blah blah.  That doesn't phase a teenager.  Simply act like this is the real world but instead of protecting data and incoming onslaughts, you are securing what your children have access to.  Remember the OSI model.  Physical is the first layer.  Secure it and the rest just requires monitoring and tweaking.



#9 andersosten

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 03:54 PM

I put the router in a metal box. I also made another box with a network timer. The network timer closes internet to childrens all computers, telephones and ipads at the same time. Not very difficult to make.

Look at video:

www://youtube.com/watch?v=RTeJxTlyMhY

Now the children have internet four hours every day.


Edited by andersosten, 24 October 2017 - 04:09 PM.


#10 Kilroy

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 12:06 PM

As others have said you're fighting a losing battle.

 

There is no point in blocking the router IP address.  If you have changed the default password for the router admin account being able to access the router via the network isn't an issue.  If the router isn't physically unavailable there is nothing to stop them from resetting it to the factory defaults.  If you set up the WiFi password and they don't know it, you would know the router was reset when all of your wireless devices stopped working, but that wouldn't prevent them from resetting it.

 

You don't mention what types of devices they are are using for Internet access.  This has a lot of bearing on how much you can do.

 

Setting up limited user accounts and having every account on the machine need a password is a valid step and actually can accomplish a lot of things.  I'm not sure what you mean by circumventing the password.  There are ways to reset a password, but no way to find out what a password is.  You can set the times that the account can log in.  However, once the machine is logged in, it won't log them out.  For logging them out you can use a scheduled task to shut down the machine.






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