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Do modems (with a dynamic IP connection) typically disconnect when idol?


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#1 kurtgillis12

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 11:28 AM

If you just have a modem and router plugged in, but no activity for a while, will modems generally disconnect from the internet? Does it depend on the ISP/brand of modem etc?

 

*idle


Edited by kurtgillis12, 03 September 2016 - 11:30 AM.


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#2 Trikein

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 11:43 AM

::Edit:: This applies to cable broadband. There likely differences with DSL. I am not familiar with DSL. 

 

As long as the DHCP client in the router is active and accessible, the DHCP lease on the IP will renew. There doesn't need to be any activity for that transaction to take place. BTW, you don't need to be doing anything actively(streaming,website,etc) for there to network activity. Computers will talk to each other and the internet because of services and programs that need the internet to work as designed. As long as the router has power and it is connected to a powered modem, your network is online.

 

Where it get's technical is if you disconnect your router from the modem longer then the DHCP lease, whether or not you get the same IP with a new lease after reconnecting. This has to do lots of things. How deep down the rabbit hole do you want to go?  :tophat:


Edited by Trikein, 03 September 2016 - 12:30 PM.


#3 kurtgillis12

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 03:13 PM

::Edit:: This applies to cable broadband. There likely differences with DSL. I am not familiar with DSL. 

 

As long as the DHCP client in the router is active and accessible, the DHCP lease on the IP will renew. There doesn't need to be any activity for that transaction to take place. BTW, you don't need to be doing anything actively(streaming,website,etc) for there to network activity. Computers will talk to each other and the internet because of services and programs that need the internet to work as designed. As long as the router has power and it is connected to a powered modem, your network is online.

 

Where it get's technical is if you disconnect your router from the modem longer then the DHCP lease, whether or not you get the same IP with a new lease after reconnecting. This has to do lots of things. How deep down the rabbit hole do you want to go?  :tophat:

Okay, so as long as it is accessible the IP will renew and remain the same. But don't some modems have a feature or something that knows when its not being used and will terminate the connection with the ISP? I feel like the whole dynamic IP system requires them to want to have enough open addresses as possible.



#4 Trikein

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 04:52 PM

"But don't some modems have a feature or something that knows when its not being used and will terminate the connection with the ISP?"

 

I think with DSL, but I am not familiar with that. Is this hypothetical or are you asking to learn about your ISP? If so, what kind of ISP do you have?

 

"I feel like the whole dynamic IP system requires them to want to have enough open addresses as possible."

 

Yes. That is the goal. But not renewing a IP means the DHCP server would have to do more work finding a new IP to assign. So having a system to detect activity and change IP lease accordingly would make less IP available, not more. The reason some DSL ISP's use that system is to save on bandwidth on the backend. With cable broadband, that kind of bandwidth use isn't as much of a problem. 



#5 kurtgillis12

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 05:40 PM

"But don't some modems have a feature or something that knows when its not being used and will terminate the connection with the ISP?"

 

I think with DSL, but I am not familiar with that. Is this hypothetical or are you asking to learn about your ISP? If so, what kind of ISP do you have?

 

"I feel like the whole dynamic IP system requires them to want to have enough open addresses as possible."

 

Yes. That is the goal. But not renewing a IP means the DHCP server would have to do more work finding a new IP to assign. So having a system to detect activity and change IP lease accordingly would make less IP available, not more. The reason some DSL ISP's use that system is to save on bandwidth on the backend. With cable broadband, that kind of bandwidth use isn't as much of a problem. 

Well, it is somewhat hypothetical :P. I don't use the service anymore, this was from around 2008-09. I have no idea whether it was cable broadband or DSL. It was with a Canadian company Bell Aliant, who also did my phones at the time. Not sure about the cable box, it could have been them too.

 

Do ISPs typically only offer one or the other? Is there an easy way I would be able to know?

 

EDIT: Yeah Im pretty sure it was DSL. I guess that changes the equation


Edited by kurtgillis12, 03 September 2016 - 08:49 PM.


#6 Trikein

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 12:17 PM

With cable, the service is assigned to the MAC address of the modem listed on your account. With DSL, the service is tied to the username and password you enter into the PPPoE client. This client could be in your computer or the router depending on your set up. If it your computer, the internet is only on when the computer is on(obviously), while if you have a router or DSL gateway, then it depends on the ISP and if you have your PPPoE client set to "always on". This is starting to become more the norm with DSL, but some older systems use a "on demand" mode that automatically creates the PPPoE handshake when ever it detects activity. 






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