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Awesome And Unexpected Things Powered By Linux


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 07:58 PM

There are a lot of things powered by Linux from Super Computers to Roku boxes Linux powers almost everything. And since this month is Linux birthday I thought I'd share this article: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2016/08/25-awesome-unexpected-things-powered-linux

And discus how Linux enriches our lives and how much we appreciate it. :)



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#2 sasschary

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 09:45 PM

An interesting read, thanks for sharing! I do a lot of things with servers, and have found Linux, though more difficult to configure sometimes, to be much superior to Windows, and especially so when it comes to working with servers. The fact that it can be quite minimalistic (That's a word, right? Chrome doesn't seem to think so...) means that more resources can be dedicated to servers and such.

 

I was introduced to Linux a while back by my uncle, who does a lot with Linux. He started me out using systemrescuecd on an old computer, so that I could get used to the command line (If only he'd told me about the startx command then...), and not have to worry too much about messing anything up. Since then, I've gotten a bit older, and now have a much better understanding of the Linux OS. Linux has always been amazing to me :)

 

Thanks again for sharing that article!

Zachary Clark



#3 DeimosChaos

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 10:38 PM

 

I was introduced to Linux a while back by my uncle, who does a lot with Linux. He started me out using systemrescuecd on an old computer, so that I could get used to the command line (If only he'd told me about the startx command then...),

 

Your uncle showed you the right way to use Linux! Might have been a bit harder to learn, but the CLI is such a powerful tool and at least the basics should be learned by even beginner nix users.


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 04:43 AM

 

 

I was introduced to Linux a while back by my uncle, who does a lot with Linux. He started me out using systemrescuecd on an old computer, so that I could get used to the command line (If only he'd told me about the startx command then...),

 

Your uncle showed you the right way to use Linux! Might have been a bit harder to learn, but the CLI is such a powerful tool and at least the basics should be learned by even beginner nix users.

 

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

While the Terminal can seem intimidating, and sometimes is at first, if used regularly, one will find it's their best Linux desktop personal assistant, far better than Cortana, Siri, and others claims to be. :)

 

Because with the Terminal, the user is in control over their computer more than ever. By chance, this is similar with cmd on Windows, yet like the Linux Terminal, too few users bothers, and there's only a short list of 'cure all's' published, probably the most published one is 'sfc /scannow'. It's often the first 'go to tool ran, yet usually fixes nothing. :P

 

While I'm sure there's power users on both sides of the table who are familiar with the proper tool for their OS (Terminal or cmd), no one has to be an expert at beginning using the Linux Terminal, beginning post install & before updating. Want security? Then enable the ufw Firewall which will load at every boot by typing (or copy/paste) sudo ufw enable followed by Enter & your password, within seconds, it shows it's activated & will be on every boot, there's much of your security ready to go. Want to update faster than ever? Do the same with sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade and as above, press Enter & password upon request. Updates will be fetched & installed, though several decisions may be need to be made on the first round, which is why I prefer to get updates in the regular manner the first time. This way, nothing gets messed up by a wrong decision. 

 

When getting updates in this manner, it's very important to look at the defaults & choose that one for each to avoid problems in the future. Defaults may be Y for Yes & N for No. These are safe defaults, so it's important to pay attention to which capital letter to type in & press Enter. The first update round has the most of these popups in the Terminal, following ones will seldom have these offered. 

 

Plus there is so much software & system customizing that can be installed via the Terminal only, so there is another reason to get acquainted with running it. :)

 

Thanks about the reminder about the System Rescue CD, just got through downloading, and using the download manager native to Firefox in Down Them All (a browser add-on or extension), used the copy/paste method to use the SHA256 checksum & in the drop down dialog to the left, selected SHA256, then began the download, was completed in a minute & 17 seconds, including the time for the ISO to be checked to be the correct one. :thumbup2:

 

BTW, while there is a way to perform this check with the Terminal (involves a lot of work), with most any modern download manager, there's no need to. Linux users also has wget as a download manager that's browser independent, other than the needed link & checksum and I'm sure there's more than one option for this. 

 

While I have some other rescue ISO's, there's always room for another. :)

 

And newbies should be introduced to the Terminal ASAP post install. If for no other reason, the initial enabling of the ufw Firewall, which will be the central point of the user's security. :thumbsup:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 SuperSapien64

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 02:18 PM


Thanks again for sharing that article!

Zachary Clark

Your welcome. :)



#6 wizardfromoz

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:14 PM

Nice one, Super :thumbup2:

 

Reinforces (the article linked) what many of us already know, but what many, many more can do with learning.

 

Linux rocks

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#7 cat1092

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 04:15 AM

SuperSapien, I forgot my manners in my above post, a huge Thanks for the posting of that article! :thumbsup:

 

It's been awhile, though I had posted long ago that several of those sites are powered by Linux & many more. Examples, utilities such as one's electricity, water/sewer, landline & cell phone infrastructure, cable TV, ISP's, banking to include making transactions, cash registers & ATM terminals & so much more are Linux powered. 

 

In fact, if it weren't for Linux, the Internet world would be far more insecure to use, and security would be more costly, because w/out Linux infrastructure, there would be far more attacks & identity theft issues taking place. We'd still be ordering merchandise by phone & snail mail. :P

 

Also noteworthy, in 2012, Arvato Digital Services was contracted by Microsoft to deliver the Windows 8 Pro promo, running from Linux servers. Though it's not news that Microsoft uses 3rd parties for this, Digital River was used for Windows 7 & Vista, am unsure of what server OS was used for those, though Digital River also does a lot more than ship Windows, which it doesn't any longer, they've became notorious for when purchasing products, that these are recurring subscriptions. I'll never purchase anything using digital River as the payment provider, unless it's clearly stated that the purchase is a one time deal (PayPal requires a manual password for approval for fund transfer anyway). 

 

If only more were in the know about Linux, usershare would double, though it's often so many choices that's confusing that prevents many from running Linux as their preferred OS. While some may know of Linux, they don't know about Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Zorin OS, Debian, Arch, FreeBSD & others. Some may try a distro, though the wrong one for a newbie, and dismiss all Linux OS's as rubbish or 'for geeks only'. Well, if that's true, then I'm a proud 7+ year old Linux Geek! :P

 

I, along with Nick, Al & pcpunk, when we were mostly hanging out in the XP section, tried to lure away as many XP users as possible to Linux, and depending on the Topic header, the warning wouldn't apply in some Topics, though did in many, and it was deemed inappropriate by some Staff members (to which I respect their decision) to suggest running Linux to overcome software issues. 

 

Thanks again for the article, we need more of these type to have on the Forum. The bad are that these can't be posted in the Windows sections w/out the  :offtopic: flag thrown, though if in General Chat, may be permitted. 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 bjornsturluson

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 08:32 AM

As the IoT revolution is now in full swing, I am excited to see what's next. Linux turned 25 and it has been such an interesting ride so far.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:33 AM

bjornsturlson,  :welcome: to the Linux Community of Bleeping Computer Forums! :)

 

We're glad to have you abroad & hope that your experience here is a positive one, where you can learn more about Linux, and if you're a veteran user, can share knowledge with the Community. :thumbup2:

 

BTW., I'm also a believer of IoT, as it's happening in front of our eyes on all types of levels, though I don't feel that it should take the place of human thinking. Not just in the distribution chain, for instance lights auto turning on when one walks into a room, or the thermostat auto kicking to desired levels at a certain time & many other things in the home alone, all controlled by the Internet, and mostly powered by some variant of Linux. 

 

There's also been in the news & online, a lot of talk & articles about the human thought process gradually going away & things becoming automated. Whether that's a good or bad thing, will be seen in the upcoming years, as self driving cars & even large transfer trucks will be running in auto pilot mode, though a human will still be able to override things if needed. The real issue with that is that one may get sleepy, or their eyes wandering away from the highway, these depends on solid lines painted on roads. If there are areas where there are none, or a small stretch where construction is going on, this can fail, and the driver must remain alert. 

 

While I believe IoT is here to stay, there will always be times when human thinking must be present, and in control when needed. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 Jeremy_C

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:57 AM

Awesome (and reassuring) article.

 

"If it was running Windows I don’t think I’d be able to sleep as soundly!" = PRICELESS :grinner:

 

Thank you!


A programmer's wife sends him to the store for a gallon of milk,

and she adds the instructions, "If there are eggs, buy a dozen."

The programmer goes to the store and returns home with 13 gallons of milk.


#11 bjornsturluson

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:38 AM

Thanks cat1092 for the warm welcome! Yet I am also worried of the potential (and contemporary) security issues that are found in IoT devices and services.



#12 DeimosChaos

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:43 AM

Thanks cat1092 for the warm welcome! Yet I am also worried of the potential (and contemporary) security issues that are found in IoT devices and services.

IoT devices are a giant security hole. They are extremely easy to hack... hopefully they get patched up and run better security soon.


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 01:24 AM

 

Thanks cat1092 for the warm welcome! Yet I am also worried of the potential (and contemporary) security issues that are found in IoT devices and services.

IoT devices are a giant security hole. They are extremely easy to hack... hopefully they get patched up and run better security soon.

 

 

I agree with this, these 'IoT' devices are setup be humans, and can be exposed by the criminal minded if not careful. 

 

Before mass deployment of these devices (many already has been), the corporations behind manufacturing these devices should incorporate more security into these. Example, a more foolproof way for consumers to program these, a fingerprint (best option) or smart card reader to control would be a good start. While this still isn't 100% secure (a criminal could force one into a setting), it's better than doing nothing to eliminate remote backdoors to these devices.

 

Also, I stand behind what I stated above, devices shouldn't be a substitute to the human thought process, though in reality, it's happening more as we speak, giving a new meaning to 'virtual reality', which is projected to rise in 2017 & beyond. Exactly what this means beyond graphics cards, I don't have the answer to that, the projection to rise in 2017 & beyond was a portion I read in a Forbes article. There's a lot of discussion about IoT everywhere, and when I keyed those words into a Google search engine, got a lot of responses, way too many for me to read. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=IoT+devices&oq=IoT+devices&aqs=chrome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

 

I'm hopeful that the majority of these devices will be powered by Linux. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 02 September 2016 - 01:38 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 SuperSapien64

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:09 PM

SuperSapien, I forgot my manners in my above post, a huge Thanks for the posting of that article! :thumbsup:

 

 

If only more were in the know about Linux, usershare would double, though it's often so many choices that's confusing that prevents many from running Linux as their preferred OS. While some may know of Linux, they don't know about Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Zorin OS, Debian, Arch, FreeBSD & others. Some may try a distro, though the wrong one for a newbie, and dismiss all Linux OS's as rubbish or 'for geeks only'. Well, if that's true, then I'm a proud 7+ year old Linux Geek! :P

 

I, along with Nick, Al & pcpunk, when we were mostly hanging out in the XP section, tried to lure away as many XP users as possible to Linux, and depending on the Topic header, the warning wouldn't apply in some Topics, though did in many, and it was deemed inappropriate by some Staff members (to which I respect their decision) to suggest running Linux to overcome software issues. 

 

Cat

Your very welcome. :) I try doing my part to spread the word of Linux to my to my friends/family and acquaintances shoot I didn't start using Linux over night I did research for about two years and started with Kubuntu which was recommended on this site, then I discovered Netrunner which was OK but once I tried Linux Mint I was hocked. So whenever I recommend Linux to someone I ask them what OS there currently using if its Windows I recommend either Linux Mint, Zorin OS or Linux Lite and if there a Mac user I recommend Elementary OS or Linux Mint Mate.



#15 cat1092

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 04:09 AM

 

 

 I try doing my part to spread the word of Linux to my to my friends/family and acquaintances 

 

SuperSapien, this is the key, to keep the good word of Linux flowing! :)

 

If every Linux user on the planet converted just one user, then usershare would double. I now have close to 60 to my name that I know of, probably more than that if the full count was known. Back when I was more mobile, did the best I could, going through 100 count sleeves of CD's at first (back when the ISO's were smaller), then DVD's, of course these would be purchased on Newegg when on promo. So I hope there's at least 50 more unaccounted for Linux users to my name, as I went through roughly 6-8 100 count sleeves of these, plus the cost of plain white paper optical media sleeves during a 3-4 year timeframe. 

 

Plus in the beginning, 3 CD/DVD burners purchased on eBay for my Dell Latitude D610, notebook optical drives wears a lot faster, and at this time, my only 'PC' if one wants to call it that, I didn't want to wear that one out, as it was more costly & no cheap replacements on eBay. Now I use that same one as a spare external (some UEFI PC's requires an external optical drive or USB stick on a USB 2.0 port for OS installs). Don't know why the installed optical drive doesn't do the same, though this is a brand specific issue, Samsung notebooks & AIO PC's being one. 

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/LLMfcy7akDpnaEfOj6l8NJr

 

I even tried a SSD in it.

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/M554jRG3jOQTe7UF8yAgRI8

 

Worst $600+ dollars I ever spent, just months after the warranty expired, so did it! :P

 

What's not shown is that it was also running Linux Mint MATE, probably 13 at the time of the final crash. One thing I learned, will never purchase an AIO PC again, because for the most part, these are built of overstock notebook components reserved for warranty repair, then engineers will design an AIO PC around these components. Some examples, I discovered right away, the wireless card was an Atheros 'G' rated one from back in 2005, and there were various 2006-2007 components on a PC that was built & sold just after the initial Windows 7 release in 2009. 

 

I know that Linux MInt didn't mess up the PC, it was just a piece of junk from the go. Hardly noticed that the SSD was installed, though at the time, I didn't know anything about an updated AMD chipset that may had helped. Now I know to be looking for these things. 

 

In fact, Linux Mint 13 was the best running OS ever to have ran on the PC, even with 4GB of RAM, W7 struggled to run, and finally threw in the towel. This was also the same year I first discovered Linux Mint, if it weren't for that, the PC wouldn't had lasted for as long as it did. :P

 

We live & learn new most every day, that's the life of a Linux user. The good thing is that most of the learning & discovery is fun. :)

 

Still have a ways to go myself, need to learn how to install Linux Mint 18 on my new self-built PC in UEFI mode. Haven't decided to install on this drive or use another. Only root will be installed to SSD anyway, home will reside on a 500GiB WD RE4 HDD, will have to decide which filesystem is best for root, ext4 or btrfs. Both has their advantages, though btrfs is supposed to supercede ext4 at some point. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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