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Hi! Windows XP boot-up problem after sp3 install and network drivers install


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#1 petite_penelope

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 07:23 PM

Hello everyone,

this is my first time here. Hopefully someone can shed some light on this problem, as it has made everything grind to a halt.

 

My main computer just died, so I figured I'd take my old computer, which was never hooked up to the internet (in order to always keep it clean as a baby's rear end), and use it to run either diagnostics and/or data recovery software on my malfunctioning C drive from my dead computer.

 

The old computer had XP pro sp2 on it, with a P4 3.4 processor, and an Intel board. The first obstacle, was getting it online. Simply plugging in the networking cable did nothing. After endless amounts of reading, it seems that because they computer was never meant to be online, the networking (or "LAN"?) drivers were never installed. After many tries and much confusion, I finally had someone find them online for me, put the drivers on a thumbdrive, and after a few attempts I was able to get this old girl connected. But I must say, for those who don't really know what they are doing very well, the procedure for setting up the network connections was anything but easy. The automated system for doing it failed every time. No reason way. So I finally managed to do it manually, somehow. To be honest, I don't even remember now. When you attempt to do something for 12 hours in a row, trying every possible solution, it's easy to forget specifics.

 

Anyway, I got hooked into the internet. The next step was upgrading to SP 3, which I had already placed on the desktop of the computer years ago. That seemed to go well. In addition to the LAN drivers, I also had a bios update. The person who got those for me knows far more than I do, so I simply clicked on the exe for the bios update without questioning it, which I assume was the latest version made for this old motherboard, the Intel D875PBZ. After it was started, it said to wait at least 3 minutes. An hour later, the screen was still black. Something was clearly wrong. After more exhaustive trail and error, it seems the bios update changed what I guess is called the "Boot order", I think? So I figured out how to get into the bios (I'd already been warned to NEVER change anything there without advice from an experienced individual). Sure enough, the 1st boot device was set to a "floppy drive", which the computer doesn't have. Not knowing which of the three hard drives the OS was on, I simply kept changing the boot order, and on the second try Windows booted up. All was well! Or...so I thought.

 

I started the long process of putting Firefox on it, and making small changes. All of this was for no reason other than gearing up for the upcoming data recovery attempt on the dead C drive from my other system. I started browsing all of the many programs available for this purpose, and R-Studio was decided upon. Again, all seemed well.

 

I had not yet even got the point of downloading the R-Studio recovery software yet, when something horrible happened. Sorry for taking so long to get to the point, but I am always afraid I'll leave something important out, which will help you guys advise me.

 

At this point, I had to restart the computer for some reason. Can't remember why. After seeming like it was going to restart as usual, it was taking to that black screen which asks you if you want to boot up in safe mode, safe mode with networking, normal mode, or the last known good configuration. Huh??? Why on earth did that happen?

 

I hoped it was just a minor glitch, and it would be resolved after the restart. So I selected "Start Normally" (if that's what the terms were), and it didn't work, it just brought me back to the same black screen asking which mode I wanted to boot up into. This time I selected Safe Mode. Same thing, right back to the black mode selection screen. So I tried "Normal" again, and it didn't work of course. But I did notice something which might be important. During the first few seconds while it was attempting to boot into Windows normally, I got to see the Blue Screen Of Death. However, it was gone in a fraction of a second. Far too quick to write down any of the details, which I'm told are important. So I tried again and again to start windows normally, hoping to catch a glimpse of the numbers in the BSOD, but it is impossible to see much of anything in the 1/10th of a second that it is on the screen. I gave up.

 

I tried the other "safe" modes a few more times, with the same results. So then I chose "Last known good configuration", and it started windows. But from what I gather, it is a state of windows which is older than some of the changes I recently made?

 

Anyway, this phenomenon continues. If I restart, I am always taken to that black mode selection screen, and "Last known good configuration" is the only one which works.

 

It's now two days later, and I've still not been able to begin the process of attempting data recovery on that C drive from the dead computer due to this booting issue. I'd like to resolve this before I start putting time into retrieving data from that drive.

 

I don't know what else you might need to help advise me. It's a P4 (old, I know), with the intel D875PBZ. 2 gigs of ram, 3 hard drives (only one of which is SATA...that's how old this thing is). A mediocre video card, can't remember the model, but it wasn't a terribly high performance card for that time period.

 

Everything seemed perfect for a while, and it looked like this would be a suitable system to use to recover data from my dead C drive from the other computer. Now this happened, and I am at a standstill. The computer works though, and I got firefox up and running, and I can browse obviously, since I'm using it to write this post.

 

Oh, just thought of something else which might help someone assist me. Seems that the guy who set up this system, probably 10 years ago, didn't use a store-bought copy of Windows. I think I recall him saying it was a "developers copy", and that I shouldn't hook it up to the internet, since Microsoft would immediately recognize it was not a legit copy of windows. I guess I forgot about that while trying to get this computer up and running. Now, my desktop went black, and I get pop-ups alerting me that I might have a counterfeit version of windows. Still works, of course. And from what I read, I can keep using it this way. But the black desktop and pop-up reminders that it's not a legit copy of windows is a form of Microsoft shaming you into fixing the situation, I suppose.

 

I don't know if that has anything to do with the problem. As before, I can't exactly remember if the Microsoft "shame" pop-ups started after my current problems, or after...but my guess is that it was after, and might be unrelated.

 

 

Sorry for this post being so long, but my inexperience tells me that the more info I list, the better.

 

Thanks very much in advance too all of you who might have a suggestion to fix this boot problem, and hopefully I can move forward and try to install and then use the R-Studio software after this problem is fixed.

 

Thanks very much!

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 07:34 PM

After tapping F8 is there a selection called Disable Autorestart on System Failure? Select it and the next time you boot the BSOD will stay on the screen.



#3 petite_penelope

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 04:11 PM

Thanks!!!  I will do that tonight and report back. Much appreciated.



#4 petite_penelope

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 04:36 PM

Ok, I'm back. Sorry that took so long.

 

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I finally have time to address this issue.

 

When you say tap F8, when exactly do I do that? As it is booting?

 

Or, are you saying that I should get into the bios, and select what you mentioned?



#5 petite_penelope

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 05:20 PM

Ok, I figured it out. Here is what was written (at least, what I assume to be the parts which are important):

 

 

IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

Tech Information:  Stop: 0x0000000A  (0X00000016, 0X00000002, 0X00000000, 0X80506991)

 

 

Does that help narrow down what might be wrong?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks again!



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 06:48 PM

As you can see from this Microsoft support page the error is going to be hard to track down.

 

I would download UBCD and burn the iso to a CD. Boot and at the menu screen select Parted Magic. At the desktop select disk health and run the short and long tests on your boot disk.

 

If the disk passes then at the menu screen select Memtest+86 under the memory category. Let it run for at least six passes and preferably overnight. 

 

Note: You can pull data from the C: drive if the file system is still intact and the drive passes by using Parted Magic on the UBCD drive. Copy it to an external flash or drive. See this guide.



#7 petite_penelope

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 07:42 PM

Wow, that's pretty complicated. I always run the risk of screwing something up very badly when I attempt things like that. But, what choices do I have?

 

To be clear, and to hopefully undo some of the confusion caused by my original post above, I should rephrase that long-winded essay, since it might have potentially implied something other than what I'd hoped to ask.

 

This is not a situation of trying to fix a failing hard drive. Yes, I did mention that, but that's the hard drive from my main system, which is dead, and in many pieces. Before I can do anything about my main system, I first have to get this old backup system to boot properly. That's the main problem. I shouldn't have mentioned anything else.

 

This old system which I'm now using as a backup, had not been started in years, and had never been connected to the internet....in order to keep it pure as the driven snow.  So in order to get it updated to the point where I could get online and start researching how to fix my main system (and the dead or dying hard drive), I first had to find and install the LAN (ethernet?) drivers. Which I did. All seemed well. Then, I installed XP Pro service pack 3. Don't know if I really needed to do that, but it had already been downloaded, years ago, and was sitting on the desktop. Then, I also found a chipset update for my motherboard (it's an Intel D875PBZ), and updated that as well. Then, I also found the most recent bios update, which I downloaded and applied as well.

And after all that, is when this booting problem happened.

 

This backup system is currently working fine, except when I attempt to restart. That's when I get that black screen asking me which mode I want to use to boot up, of which only the "last known good configuration" works.

 

Though inexperienced as I am, this seems to be a conflict which was initiated by those four updates:  Bios update. LAN driver update. Chipset update. And updating to XP pro service pack 3. Before I did that, everything was running exactly as it did when I last used this computer, several years ago.

 

There is nothing to indicate that anything is wrong with my OS drive.

 

With this in mind, do you perhaps have a suggestion? Should I simply undo all of those updates? If I undo the LAN/ethernet update, I'll have no connectivity.

 

Thanks again for your assistance.



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:18 PM

If you want to get on the internet you can boot from a live linux CD. This would also be the safest option as XP has security holes and is no longer updated. 

 

For your purpose of researching on the internet you can use UBCD which includes hard drive and memory diagnostics along with Parted Magic which is essentially an OS that runs from disk and RAM. You can burn the iso to a CD using a program like Imgburn or on a Windows 7 or later computer by right clicking the iso file and selecting Burn Disk Image. How much RAM is on the computer?

 

Parted Magic may be able to mount the drive allowing you to copy any data to an external drive. See this guide. 

 

I take it you do not have a XP install disk so you could do a clean install of XP, correct?



#9 petite_penelope

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 09:11 PM

Hello again,

No, I don't have a legit install disk. I do have one for the dead computer, but from what I understand, it won't work, as Microsoft can identify that you are trying to use the disc for a second computer, and it is only good for a single machine. Plus, I'd hate to wipe the OS on this backup computer, and all the reinstalling-software difficulties that brings with it, especially considering that I strongly suspect this current booting issue is a simple fix. At least, it certainly seems as such.

 

Couldn't I simply undo those four updates I mentioned? Isn't it fairly safe to assume that one of those updates is to blame for this boot problem? Everything was working well previous to those updates.

 

I wonder how long I can simply keep doing what I'm doing... booting by selecting "last known good configuration". Or more to the point, what the problems associated with booting this way are. Currently, this computer is perfectly usable using that booting method. What the long-term problems will be, I have no idea.

 

I should add, the whole reason for getting this old system up and running, was to attempt data recovery on the C drive from my dead system. But I didn't want to start that process until I'd fixed this boot issue on this old backup computer. But, since it seems to be working fine at the moment, perhaps I should really address the task at hand, getting data off the dead C drive. Which, unless I misunderstood, is exactly what you had advised and explained earlier. But I must be honest, those methods are a bit advanced for me. I am frightened of screwing something up. Is there not some decent software for getting data off of a corrupted (but not mechanically damaged) hard drive which is connected via USB?

 

I did connect that dead C drive to this backup computer, via a usb external case. This computer was able to see it, but not access any data. It claimed the hard drive was completely empty too, which it of course isn't. Also, attempting to look into that dead hard drive caused this system to slow down horribly.

 

Considering my lack of experience and technical savvy, a data recovery program would be a lot simpler for me than booting into an alternate OS. Unless, of course, there is no other way.

 

Is there such a program you'd recommend? I found one called R-Studio, for $79, which seems to be popular. But there's no way of knowing if it will work on this drive, without buying it first.

 

What an extreme hassle this has turned into. That's what I get for using such an old computer, and being so bad about backing things up.



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 09:32 PM

If you can boot using last know good configuration then do that and uninstall the last updates in Control Panel or do a System Restore to a date just before the updates but I would advise against doing a System Restore if the update that gave the problem was SP3.  I would concentrate on recovering your data.

 

I would  boot using last known good configuration and test the drive in the enclosure using Seatools for Windows. This would give you an idea on the chances for data recovery. Do the short test first. 

 

http://www.seagate.com/support/downloads/item/seatools-win-master/

 

With the hard drive attached via the enclosure open Disk Management. Right click My Computer > Manage > Disk Management.  Is the drive listed as RAW?

 

Edit: Did this problem start after installing drivers?


Edited by JohnC_21, 28 August 2016 - 09:37 PM.


#11 petite_penelope

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 10:57 PM

Hello again,

no, the problem didn't start after installing drivers, because the problem was in a completely different computer.

 

With so much written, I guess it was easy to misunderstand.

 

The computer I'm on right now, is just an old computer I'm using as a backup. And it's this same old backup computer which has the booting problem, which is most likely due to the updates I mentioned.

 

The damaged C drive which I need to attempt data recovery on... has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with this old backup computer.

 

My main computer, we'll call it Computer A, died suddenly. So I started up Computer B after many years of not using it. But in getting Computer B ready, I applied all those updates I mentioned, and that booting problem started.

 

The entire reason for getting Computer B up and running, is to attempt data recovery on the C drive from the dead Computer A.

 

Make more sense?



#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 07:17 AM

 

 

But I didn't want to start that process until I'd fixed this boot issue on this old backup computer. But, since it seems to be working fine at the moment, perhaps I should really address the task at hand, getting data off the dead C drive. 

 

Yes, I understand. The old computer can boot if using last know configuration. Leave it running and do not reboot. Download Seatools for Windows and do the short test on your bad hard drive. If it fails you probably will not be able to recover all of your data. If it passes tjhen you are dealing with a software problem, not hardware, and your chances of recovery are a lot better.

 

When you attached the drive to the computer using USB how is it shown in Disk Management? If the drive was listed as completely empty it may show up as RAW in Disk Management. 


Edited by JohnC_21, 29 August 2016 - 07:19 AM.


#13 petite_penelope

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 06:04 PM

Hello again,

yes, that is exactly right.

 

Ok, I will do as you specify.

 

Also, yes, I did indeed connect the bad hard drive to Computer B via an external case. Or more specifically, I think it's called a "dock". You slip the drive into a large slot.

 

Though I'm lacking in any real tech knowledge, I did know about disk manager. I started up the manager, and it did indeed "see" the bad drive. However, it was listed as being completely empty, which it of course isn't. Also, I could not explore the drive. It showed up under disk management, but nothing could be done to it, nor could it be explored. Also, when attempting to explore the drive, computer B slowed down to an extreme level. After I disconnected the bad drive, Computer B returned to normal.

 

Don't know if that is a good sign, or bad. I have a slight suspicion  (well, a hope, actually), that this isn't a mechanical failure, but rather....a corruption of the "index" (don't know if that's the right term) due to Computer A shutting down abruptly when it died recently. I say this because a while ago  (unrelated to anything we've been discussing)  I had two hard drives in an external dock. Foolishly, I forgot to go through the "disconnect USB devices" prior to powering the external drives off. Big mistake. When I restarted, both of those drives were unreadable. Clearly, shutting them off before going through the procedure of properly disconnecting a USB device corrupted something.

 

Similarly, the hard drive we've been discussing, (the dead/bad/corrupted C drive from Computer A), also went through something slightly similar when that entire system initially died. Due to unknown causes, Computer A just powered off unexpectedly. So therefore, this C drive might be suffering from the same type of corruption as those two external drives did in the past, as opposed to a catastrophic mechanical failure.

 

Well, that's my hope, at least. From what I've read since we started exchanging messages, there are Linux programs which can actually repair that damage, assuming nothing else is wrong with the drive, of course. And when/if you fix it, you can theoretically put that same drive right back into use again. That, would be grand! Phenomenal!  Extraordinary!!!! I'd give up eating meat, swearing, and even drinking soda for an entire year....for such a happy ending.

 

But, first things first. I will find, install, and run that test you mentioned before anything else.

 

I am lucky you came along. You are owed thanks.

 

I will attempt to do what you said tonight, and I'll report the result immediately.

 

Thanks a million!



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 06:30 PM

No problem,

 

Only do the short test. In Device Management was not listed as RAW or not initialized? 

 

I think Parted Magic may have a good chance of mounting the drive allowing you to copy the data but R-studio is very good at recovering files. After recovering your files you may want to do a chkdsk /r on the drive. Don't do a chkdsk unless you are sure all your files are recovered.

 

Edit: I think Parted Magic on UBCD may have a good chance of mounting the bad drive.


Edited by JohnC_21, 29 August 2016 - 06:37 PM.


#15 petite_penelope

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 09:37 PM

Bless you for all your efforts. However, before I try anything (due to my very real fear of inadvertently causing more damage), I made a new decision.....a data recovery professional! Why not? Before I potentially do something irreversible by accident, I should probably let a company which does nothing other than data recovery look at it. After all, two of them in my town are offering a free diagnostic. Seems like a very good option, since I assume based on their long list of very positive reviews that they are not in the business of inventing problems....like an auto repair shop. Plus, if it is indeed a worse-case scenario of completely unrecoverable proportions, I will have spent nothing. One of the companies even does that immensely expensive cleanroom forensic data recovery. But that, is in the thousands of dollars from what I understand.

 

Regardless of what happens, I'll return and give you a detailed explanation. That way, the specifics of this problem will be listed here for hopefully years, and it might help others out in the future, should they have a similar incident with similar symptoms.






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