Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Need to buy a new computer. should I go with Linux OS?


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#16 Al1000

Al1000

  • Global Moderator
  • 8,120 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:04:43 PM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 05:03 PM

You may well find that your current computer is fast enough running Linux. It has DDR2 RAM, and if you want to spend money on it to make it faster, more RAM would give you the best bang for your buck.

If Photoshop is a necessity, I would certainly go for the dual-boot option. That means you can switch over to Linux gradually, and there's no hurry to get your printer and scanner installed, which may or may not be straightforward.

If Gimp proves to be a substitute for Photoshop, and you end up not using XP for anything, deleting it from your computer using Linux is easy.

The first thing to do however, is to download a Linux distro, burn it to DVD and try it out from the DVD. This doesn't involve making any changes to your computer, except installing software to burn the ISO if you don't already have it. Linux Mint is always a good choice for beginners, although I would stick with the Xfce or MATE desktops due to your computer's lack of RAM. It could probably run the "top of the range" Cinnamon, but the operating system itself would use up around one third of your computer's RAM, whereas Xfce and MATE are considerably lighter.

Here's a guide to burning a DVD on XP:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/527392/with-xp-ending-what-are-your-alternatives/

Edited by Al1000, 23 August 2016 - 05:07 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#17 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,856 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:03:43 AM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 05:07 PM

 

on average, might my 11 year old Gateway have left in it?

Hard to say, It could run another 5 or more years with Linux  on it.

 

 

I guess without the bloatware etc it will be faster.

 

Puppy Linux for example, will make that 11 year old PC  look like a new supercomputer.



#18 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,380 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 07:50 PM

as for buying a new machine well you could build one.

Its actually not hard to actually build your own PC plus it will be cheaper in the long run then buying from OEM.


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

8spxh0-6.png


#19 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,445 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 08:40 PM

as for buying a new machine well you could build one.

Its actually not hard to actually build your own PC plus it will be cheaper in the long run then buying from OEM.

Doubtful OP could build one on the budget that was mentioned. Getting a refurbed office machine is probably the best bet. You can get some really decent ones for ~300.

 

Lot of clutter going on in here...

 

From what I can gather... OP, if you are set on wanting to get a new PC, I would go for it (well new/old). Gives you a nice performance increase and you can choose to leave Windows on it (most of the refurbished ones come with an installation of Windows), or put Linux on it, or both. Then with your old Gateway you can load that up with just Linux and play around. If you screw up you won't have to worry about killing any data you might have had on it since it is the "play" machine.

 

Just my thoughts anyway.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#20 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,350 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 08:45 PM

1. So it might be a better idea to buy a new MS OS computer instead of a new computer loaded with the Linux OS?  

 

2. and install the Linux OS on my Gateway computer after deleting the MS OS?   

 

3. Wouldn't the old computer (once the MS OS is deleted and replaced by Linux) be slower than the new one?  

 

4. Or would the idea be to load the Linux to the old computer just to get used to the Linux OS...then eventually load Linux to the new computer I buy and have a dual OS computer?

1. I would buy the new M.S. Loaded pc, I think it is a better financial decision and there are a few things I've found difficult on Linux.  Linux is free so no need to let the OEM's charge you for it with a new pc.  The selection and cost of Linux Computers is not all that good IMO.  If you get a new pc, - which is a good idea considering the age - you might think about the cost of an extra Drive.  This way you could install Linux to a different Drive all together on the new pc without much complicated work.  

 

2. Yes, or dual boot the Gateway also.  If you have all your work backed up, attempting a Dual Boot would be good experience, and considering it will be your backup pc...no worries if something goes wrong.  If you don't want to loose XP then make sure you have the OEM Install Media.

 

3. NickAu answered this to some degree because it all depends on what new computer you buy and what Linux you run on the old pc.  If you don't upgrade to more than that 1GB of RAM you will have to run a specific Linux OS for it to be very fast.  See, Linux developers have designed Operating Systems to be used with all different types of hardware.  Low Powered, older computers work quite well with certain Linux Operating Systems, like NickAu suggested, Puppy Linux.  Some Linux systems require better-more powerful hardware.  4GB of RAM for that pc looks to be 30 bucks US.

 

4. This is probably what I would do, that is, if you have space for two desktops.  Linux is easy to use, just trying to cover all bases here.

 

DC is right on here, and earlier.  I'll try to sit back and watch as this Thread is getting long fast lol.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#21 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,467 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:04:43 PM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 07:09 AM

Hi, 1970AMX.

 

Mmm. Well, I think the last 2 or 3 posts have hit the nail on the head. You're probably better off buying a 'new'/refurb machine with Windows already installed (for PhotoShop, at any rate.....although it depends on the version that you use.)

 

Then, with the old machine, scrap the Windows install, and I would second Nick's advice. Something lightweight, like Puppy Linux, which is designed to keep older hardware useful (and run at a good speed!), would be well worth trying. You can try it out in the same manner; download the .iso image, burn to CD (DVDs won't be necessary, Puppy will easily fit onto a CD), and then run Puppy from the LiveCD.

 

http://puppylinux.com/

 

(You'll find that pretty much all my posts include some reference to Puppy, as it's the only OS I run.....although I do run over a dozen of the little darlings..! I also agree with Nick, in that with the right distro, you won't recognise your old Gateway as the same machine, it'll run that much faster & smoother...)

 

Puppy is chock-full of 'tooltips' & 'wizards'; one reason why many Windows 'refugees' find it so easy to get used to. It comes supplied, OOTB, with pretty well all the applications most people could want, and those that aren't, are either available via Puppy's Package Manager, or available through the Puppy Forum:-

 

http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/index.php

 

And one advantage of Puppy is that it can be run, full-time, from a flash-drive. At boot, Puppy is loaded, in its entirety, into RAM, and runs from there.....and RAM is the fastest component on your machine (with the exception of the CPU's built-in memory caches.) Which is why Puppy runs so fast!

 

The other advantage to this, of course, is that you then have a totally portable OS that you can take anywhere with you, and run from any machine (as long as it supports 'legacy' MBR booting from USB.)

 

I myself run Photoshop CS2 on many of my Puppy installs under WINE. It runs flawlessly, too; it actually runs better than it ever did under XP! I've written a tutorial for doing this in Puppy in the Linux & Unix How-to & Tutorials section of this forum.

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/620867/installing-adobes-photoshop-cs2-in-the-later-puppies-under-wine/

 

The main caveat here being that my tutorial only works, as is, for that particular elderly version of Photoshop (which is still very powerful, even so.) WINE is a somewhat hit-and-miss proposal, I'm afraid; some Windows stuff works perfectly under it, but many will not. This is why the WINE HQ website maintains a database of what will, and won't, work with it.

 

(I also run the GIMP, too, and switch backwards & forwards from one to the other. I've been using both for some years, and while the interface is rather different, they both perform pretty much the same tasks.)

 

So yes, it is possible. However, you may be more comfortable using one of the other suggested distros; Puppy, even by Linux standards, is a bit 'off-beat', and does things in its own very unique way. It's biggest advantage, by far, is what's called the 'frugal' install. It runs from 3 or 4 compressed, 'read-only' files, which de-compress into RAM at boot. Every time you boot Puppy, you get a brand-spanking-new, squeaky-clean copy of Puppy!

 

And if anything ever goes wrong, as long as you keep backup copies of everything, you can restore Pup with a simple copy/paste operation. Puppy is the only Linux distro there is that can do this. This won't work with any of the others.

 

Which is why I use it. It's pretty much foolproof, and means that a dozy old codger like me has less chance of things going wrong..!  :rolleyes:  :P

 

We should be able to help you get something sorted out; there's plenty of knowledgeable individuals here on BC, and while none of us is expert with everything in the Linux world, between us we have a fairly broad span of experience.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 24 August 2016 - 07:23 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 500GB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#22 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,350 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 10:53 AM

Surely this is information overload lol, but thought I would suggest one other idea.  

 

Purchase a inexpensive SSD and RAM for your Gateway for about 70 US, I'll leave a few links, others can double check my thoughts.  Then you can leave XP on your current Drive and install Linux to the SSD, or a cheap HDD.

SSD

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&N=100011693%20600414916%20600414917

RAM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA26X42Z1672&utm_medium=BehEmail&cm_mmc=EMCPB-082016-_-PB-_-Bluecore-_-Content&utm_campaign=Post_Browsed&obem=byRtXSfX2Fh1caM-yKB31Xq5T8ExBU8_mDS4UehImKM%3D&utm_source=Bluecore

 

pcpunk


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#23 1970AMX

1970AMX
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 19 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:43 AM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 04:13 PM

Everyone has been very helpful and I appreciate the support.

 

@  Al1000 

 

I will look into Gimp as a substitue for Photoshop.  Thanks for the link for burning the Linux CD.

 

@ Mike_Walsh

 

I'll give Puppy a try, probably along with one or more others that were suggested here.

--------------------------------------------------

 

Theoretically I like the idea of upgrading my Gateway, but being that it is old (and eventually prone to failure...I may not be able to troubleshoot it if it dies), I'm leaning toward buying a refurbished MS OS computer as seems to be the general consensus.  Then possibly  keeping the Operating Systems separate by installing on separate hard drives.

 

Shouldn't need a computer that lots of RAM etc, since I plan to run mainly or exclusively Linux in the future.  I do plan on sticking to brands and/or models that are known to be reliable for as many years as possible. 

 

I'm going to reference this thread after I get the newer computer and put the various ideas to the test.

 

Plan to post a new thread in another section to ask about which computer would be the best to buy in my situation.


Edited by 1970AMX, 24 August 2016 - 04:19 PM.


#24 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 6,350 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 08:45 PM

 

Plan to post a new thread in another section to ask about which computer would be the best to buy in my situation.

When you do, link us to it at this Thread.  O, you already have multiple posts about buying a pc, I would just use one of those to follow up with this, imo.    

 

Adviser cat1092 told me about newegg a while back, so I'll share a quick Refurbished Dell Desktop search for you.  Most IT Pro's tell me Dell is a really good pc.  It's based on 200-300 US, I seen at your other posts 300 was your Cap.  For some reason I could not find many Dell's closer to the 300 mark?  

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&N=100019096%204018%20600014652%204016%20600078164%20600078158

 

Good luck


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#25 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,027 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:11:43 AM

Posted 29 August 2016 - 06:16 AM

 

 

Wouldn't the old computer (once the MS OS is deleted and replaced by Linux) be slower than the new one?

Quite the opposite with the right Linux installed it will be faster than any Windows system.

 

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

The main reason being the lack of overhead that causes many Windows computers to take 2-5 minutes to be ready to use. With Linux, there's next to none of this, so in seconds after login, you're ready to go. :)

 

There are even some low cost dual core CPU's that you can find on eBay for under $20 for more power. The Intel Core 2 Duo E6700 from the below list looks like a decent upgrade & your 300W PSU can handle it with ease, plus a low power PCIe graphics card, I see that you have a PCIe x16 slot for this purpose.

 

However, I cannot advise one to throw a lot of cash into a 11 year old PC, the CPU I mentioned would be a reasonable upgrade to boost performance at a low cost. If you have a spare GPU laying around, or know of anyone who wants to give one away, that may be a better option for the graphics. There are many under $15 PCIe GPU's on eBay that comes with the needed DMS-59 adapter for VGA or DVD-D ports on monitors that are better than onboard graphics & Linux Mint will install the proper drivers. Doesn't matter if it's a Dell, HP, or other OEM brand of card, as most all of these are AMD rebranded cards anyway. 

 

Sound is fine with the 7.1 channel & in fact, with the optical port, quite modern for it's time. Many PC's of today has no fiber optic audio port for crystal clear audio. While there's a cable to connect to speakers, there's actually a light inside to carry the signal, rather than a copper wire. These works great with soundbars that has this type of input, though the cable costs a bit more (Monoprice is a great, low cost source for these & other cables). It sort of mystifies me as to why so many OEM's refuses to install such a port today, even on some $2,000 computers, while the $145 ASUS Z97-Pro Gamer motherboard I just used as part of a build has it, as well as an ASRock Extreme6 that I'm considering purchasing for $130. I believe the OEM's are doing this to upsell an audio card for another $200, that's often not as good as one on Newegg for $80. 

 

BTW, Newegg is a decent source for refurbished computers, as is eBay. However, positive feedback & lots of it, is a must have, if obtaining one on eBay. I scored a killer Dell Optiplex 780 with an Intel Core 2 Quad 9650 in excellent condition for $94, plus $20 for shipping, and it came with a one year warranty. That PC is now running W10 Anniversary Edition w/out any issues, and even at 8 years old, the Q9650 is still a powerful CPU for many uses & at time of release, was Intel's best consumer/business CPU. In fact, is still rated highly on Overclock.net, and to describe how lucky I was, the CPU (used) often goes for more than what I paid for the PC, loaded with Windows 7 Pro, including recovery partition. So in essence, I got a CPU, with a bonus PC & Windows 7 Pro as freebies & so far, the best one running W10. 

 

So w/out a doubt, I know that Linux Mint would scream on the hardware, even when running a virtual machine. :)

 

There's some refurbished PC's that's reloaded with either the latest LTS version of Ubuntu or Linux Mint, though when I purchase one, I want the Windows license, it's worth more should I decide to resell, than w/out it. You can find something decent inside of $150, anything more than that isn't worth it, unless not too old (less than 5 years), then I may go up to $200. Anything above that, I can go to Costco & grab a PC that has a year's warranty, plus Costco guarantees for a 2nd year. And Walmart has some deals, though some are overpriced. The $248-388 models, not as much so, the ones that's over $500 typically are. That's why I prefer Costco to Walmart for a new PC. 

 

Though am now into building my own, to eliminate the bottlenecks & bloatware that ships with OEM PC's. And one has to watch out when installing the MB, as the DVD with drivers are also loaded with junk. I go to the site & get updated drivers, and install these only. If being used for a pure Linux PC, this isn't a necessary step, if connected to the Internet during install, most of the drivers will also be installed. Exceptions may be Intel or AMD microcode (watch out for Intel microcode on some unlocked CPU's, such as the Pentium G3258 Anniversary edition), as any overclocking will be stopped forever, even if another OS is installed. The microcode really isn't needed for Intel CPU's anyway, it's just a slick way for Intel to cripple some unlocked CPU's. 

 

Good Luck, no matter which choice you make! :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users