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Virtual Machine


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#1 Voidz

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:44 PM

Hi guys! I was planning on installing a virtual machine on my laptop for education purposes (I would be installing Linux, and learning how to use the command line interface) 

 

I was just worried that since people say Virtual Machine OS's run slower than your real OS, that my specs wouldn't be enough or I dont have enough RAM. The laptop I will be installing it on has got:

 

CPU: I3 3110M

RAM: 4GB

HDD: 1TB

 

Would the virtual machine be too slow for me to be able to reasonably use?

 

(I didnt know where to post this, I thought there would be a sub section for just virtual machine questions, but I couldnt find it, I hope this is the right place.)


Edited by hamluis, 04 February 2017 - 05:58 PM.
Moved from All Other Apps to VMs - Hamluis.


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#2 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 03:10 PM

if your just looking to do command line why not just make a Linux bootable usb?



#3 Voidz

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 03:29 PM

if your just looking to do command line why not just make a Linux bootable usb?

Dual booting? I didnt really think about that, but it is a good option. Thank you.



#4 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 04:03 PM

happy to help, its how I learned to get back into Linux :)



#5 smax013

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 05:05 PM

Hi guys! I was planning on installing a virtual machine on my laptop for education purposes (I would be installing Linux, and learning how to use the command line interface) 
 
I was just worried that since people say Virtual Machine OS's run slower than your real OS, that my specs wouldn't be enough or I dont have enough RAM. The laptop I will be installing it on has got:
 
CPU: I3 3110M
RAM: 4GB
HDD: 1TB
 
Would the virtual machine be too slow for me to be able to reasonably use?
 
(I didnt know where to post this, I thought there would be a sub section for just virtual machine questions, but I couldnt find it, I hope this is the right place.)


You likely should have no issues using a virtual machine for the purposes you describe. Most Linux variants tend to be much less resource hogs than Windows...and you said you mainly want to focus on learning the command line interface, which should be even less resource intensive.

For reference point, I run Parallels on a 1st Gen MacBook Pro with a CoreDuo (not Core2Duo) processor and 2 GB of RAM in order to run a graphical interface structural engineering analysis program in Windows XP while still running an email client, Word, Excel and browser on the Mac side. In those circumstances, it was slow as it had run out of RAM and was using virtual RAM, but when run alone, it ran fine. You will be dealing with 4 GB of RAM (with the possible potential of expanding if your computer supports it). You definitely should have no problem if only running the VM, but even with a few other minor programs running you should have no problem. And keep in mind that VM programs now do much better with graphical programs (i.e. lose much less performance in a VM than what used to be the case...still not 100% the same as running natively).

End result is that I doubt you will have any problem. RAM will be your most likely area of constraint, but 4 GB is pretty good. If you can bump it up to 8 GB, then you really should have no problem.

And if you do, then you can always either run Linux natively in a dual boot or consider a liveCD version.

#6 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 11 September 2016 - 01:24 AM

Your CPU has virtualization support so yes you can run a VM on it. I would suggest staying away from distros that use Gnome, KDE, or Unity as their desktop environment as those will run the least smoothly in a VM.

 

Personally I like Lubuntu, which is an official Ubuntu derivative. It uses LXDE for the desktop environment, which is very lightweight, so it runs nicely in a VM. Alternatively there is also an LXDE release of Debian. If you don't need a GUI at all, consider Ubuntu Server.


Edited by hollowface, 11 September 2016 - 01:26 AM.





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