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Cloned Windows 7 pro OEM , upgraded to Windows 10


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#1 Timescope

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 10:39 PM

Hello,

 

I have two hard drives :

 

1. 320GB Windows 7 pro OEM

 

2. 500GB clone of (1) upgraded to Windows 10 pro 1511.

 

I cloned my Windows 7 pro OEM hard disk and upgraded the clone to Windows 10 pro 1511. Activation was successful (Digital Entitlement).

 

My question is, will the upgrade invalidate the original (320GB) Windows 7 OEM product key after the one month period to go back to Windows 7 ends ?

 

The upgrade to Windows 10 had various problems : disk management "unable to connect to virtual disk service", Windows Defender update stuck at 50% for hours, usb internet modem software had to be re-installed each time it was disconnected etc so after hours of trying to repair Windows 10, I swapped the hard drives and went back to Windows 7.

 

In other words, can I continue to use the original OEM hard drive without problems ?

 

Thanks,

Timescope


Edited by hamluis, 21 August 2016 - 10:05 AM.
Moved from Windows 7 to Windows 10 Discussion - Hamluis.


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:25 AM

The answer to your question is that you can continue using the OEM hard drive with Windows 7 without issue.

 

The upgrading of a Windows 7 system to Windows 10 doesn't invalidate the original Windows 7 license.  The proviso that is added to the Windows 7 and Windows 10 licenses for a Windows 10 system that was created by an upgrade (the cloning is irrelevant here) is that you may not run the original instance of Windows 7 and the upgraded Windows 10 either truly simultaneously on different hardware or via a dual boot arrangement.   You have a valid license for Windows 7, provided you are not also running the upgraded Windows 10, and the converse.

 

You should be good to run Windows 7 for as long as you wish to provided you don't also try to run the instance of Windows 10 that is the result of the upgrade to the Windows 7 base license.  You also have the option, and fully legal one, to switch out your drives and to see if later Windows 10 updates may solve your early issues by allowing them all to apply.  I know lots of people who upgraded and rolled back so that they would have a legal Windows 10 license for a given piece of hardware if they decided they wanted to go to Windows 10 later.  Most of them did this with one hard drive, not two, but as long as one of them is "gathering dust" at all times what you've done is the equivalent.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#3 Timescope

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:27 AM

Thanks Hamluis,

 

I originally wanted to post it here, but decided to post it in the Windows 7 forum because it concerns the Windows 7 license.

 

No replies to a post would suggest that it is (a) stupid, irrelevant or poorly worded or (B) no one knows the answer.

 

I did some research and my fears are justified : the license of backup copies of Windows 7 will expire one month after the upgrade to Windows 10.

 

http://www.tenforums.com/installation-setup/20948-windows-7-upgrade-windows-10-then-clean-install-dual-boot.html

 

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/free-upgrade-from-windows-7-to-windows-10-dual/29b232b2-ac67-45d6-be88-ac14b0c7bf8e?page=1

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3050502/windows/you-can-dual-boot-windows-7-with-windows-10-but-theres-a-catch.html

 

sfc /scannow and DISM repair using install .wim failed to correct the disk management problem so I have no option but to roll back to Windows 7 using

 

the facility in Windows 10 (which I am posting this with) and try to recover my original license.

 

Timescope.


Edited by Timescope, 21 August 2016 - 11:45 AM.


#4 Timescope

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:36 AM

Thanks britechguy,

 

You won the gold medal by two minutes ! I had almost given up.

 

Thanks for your reply. I thought the same myself but from what I have read, the upgrade to Windows 10 is like a trade-in and the original license may be de-activated at a later date by Microsoft

 

Timescope.


Edited by Timescope, 21 August 2016 - 11:43 AM.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:57 AM

Timescope,

 

          This issue has come up on these forums multiple times and direct links to Microsoft support discussions where this is discussed have been posted as well.  I have yet to see a Microsoft employee make the statement that the Windows 7 license ever expires, just that it cannot be used concurrently with a Windows 10 instance that had that Windows 7 instance as its "parent."  This concept is not easy for many to grasp and there have been some really tortured ways of trying to describe the situation.

 

           They're basically following what has been standard industry practice forever in cases where upgrades to completely new versions of a piece of software are done by "overlaying" the old software.  The original license is valid, if the original software is running and the upgraded is not, and the upgrade license is valid if the upgrade is running, but the original software is not.  If you had a single user license for a single instance you still have a single user license for a single instance.  You don't have any expanded license rights on either that would allow the other to be running on either the original hardware or alternate hardware concurrently with the other.  You've got the rights to run one, or the other, but not both at any given moment in time.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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