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Setting up 1st NAS & looking for advice...


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#1 bowser1313

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 07:29 PM

I picked up a QNAP TS-251 on sale and will be using it as a server to back up desktops & serve some business files to a small 4 person office (quickbooks, office documents, and artwork) and also would like to use it to stream music videos and tutorials upstairs for when I'm by the piano giving lessons or composing. 

I picked up two 2 identical 2 TB Hitachi HDs and have already used Crystal Disks Info and HD Sentinel to check disk health of each, which was perfect. I also ran the short test and random access test on each drive and they were fine. I would like to know what programs/tests people run to "burn test" their HDs to minimize the possibility of these drives failing shortly after install and setup. 

I would also like to know how to best configure these drives for performance/storage and setup my QNAP given my intended use. Should I format these HDs with windows, use some QNAP formatting software or just pop them in as they are. The drives are both unformatted and I've just started doing my research w respect to QNAP/NAS in general, so any advice or tutorial from someone with actual experience would be great.

 

Thanks in advance...



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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 07:33 PM

I recommend letting each HD work independently of the other, in short, not "merging" them to act as one drive.  I think there is another thread in which one of the two or more merged drives went bad, thread starter there asked how to fix, I don't remember the outcome.


Edited by RolandJS, 20 August 2016 - 10:53 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

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#3 bowser1313

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 07:39 PM

Thanks, Roland.  I'll keep that in mind.

 

Any suggestions on what software to use to "burn test" my hard drives to make sure they're OK before setting them up. 

I'd hate to install, configure and port over all my date only to have them fail and read that hard drives usually fail within a very short period of time... or last for years.

 

Also is there anything I should do setting up the QNAP? 

Or should i just pop in the drives and start using it?



#4 RolandJS

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 10:55 PM

The only complete burn test I know of is to "non-Quick", full format each drive -- which will take a long long time for each one.  I have no idea what QNAP means, no idea on setting up a NAS; you'll have to wait til NAS gurus weigh in -- they can give you guidance.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

"I heard Spock finally got colander!"  "I believe the word is Kolinahr."  "Oh."


#5 Kilroy

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:01 AM

I agree with RolandJS that a full format will be a "burn in" for you.  If you have a copy of SpinRite you can also use that, but SpinRite will take much longer.  I'm waiting for the next version as it isn't time effective to use SpinRite on a large, 1TB or bigger, drive.

 

I don't know if the QNAP allows RAID.  How you configure the drives depends on how much space you want and how losing the data would affect you.  With two drives you would have three possible options.  RAID 0 is for speed and losing a drive will result in a total loss of data. RAID 1 is to protect against drive failure, you will only have the storage space of one drive, but if either drive dies all of your data is safe. Two separate drives where you have no protection against drive failure, but if one drive dies the data on the other drive is safe. 



#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 12:30 PM

Qnap does support raided drives.  No need to "burn in" drives anymore due to spare sectoring.  If the qnap supports SMART you should enable it.  The qnap will do the formatting and sharing with its own users/shares setup.  You don't use windows for this as it has its own OS usually a Linux flavor.  I always raid my drives for fault tolerance due to I hate losing data


Edited by Wand3r3r, 22 August 2016 - 12:31 PM.


#7 Trikein

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 01:03 PM

Were you looking for advice/info on the networking aspect of the NAS? For example, do you need to access the NAS off network? Will you be using QNAP's proprietary IoT standard? 


Edited by Trikein, 22 August 2016 - 01:03 PM.





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