Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

HP Dv6 Pavillion Laptop problems


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 adamjedgar

adamjedgar

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:46 AM

Posted 20 August 2016 - 06:39 PM

Hi guys,
I have a DV6 pavillion that has been in mothballs for almost 2 years because i thought the monitor or video card had stopped working (blank screen).
 
Got it out the other day and decided to put it back together and turn it on as i figured perhaps the problem may not be the screen but something else (such as a virus).
 
You can imagine my surprise when it booted up perfectly...I was then very suspicious that perhaps it may have a virus. Anyway, it was late at night so I turned it off with the idea that the next day I would tackle that problem.
 
The next day things did not go to plan...system refused to boot, although I could at that time access bios but nothing more (ie no boot from dvd drive)
 
I decided to remove the hdd and reformat it using a desktop pc and have completed that task then I removed battery, cmos battery, disconnected power too.
 
However, I am now having problems at the BIOS level...the system keeps saying the hdd self test needs to be completed (even though the drive is working fine in desktop pc.)
 
My feeling is that perhaps the virus has got into the bios...or at least the bios may be corrupted.

 

Anyway, I have inserted a dvd into the drive and am attempting to boot from it (i changed the boot order to dvd)I have tried to boot from Windows 8 cd, after what seems like ages a windows 8 logo comes up on the screen then the systems hangs at this logo.

 

​I am able to run the  Primary Hard Disk Self Test. Results displayed on screen after about 5 minutes are as follows;
 
Primary Hard Disk Self Test
Quick test
00%Complete
Hard Disk 1 Quick (303)
 
Full Test
00%Complete...
Hard disk 1 Full (305)
SMART Check
Hard Disk SMART Passed
 
Press <Esc>  to continue
 
When I hit <esc> the following is displayed
 
"Hard Disk Test" Failed
"Hard Disk Quick" (303)
"Hard Disk Full" (305)

 

Memory test pass

 

I'm not understanding why it is failing the hdd test when I can easily access the hdd when it is installed in my desktop pc!

 

Have I formatted the drive incorrectly in desktop pc? (desktop pc runs Windows 10 x64)

 

Do I have a virus in the bios?

 

UPDATE

I am now seeing a windows automatic repair screen when booting from the hirans cd (hirans cd doesn't have windows 8 automatic repair on it and the hdd has no OS on it because I formatted the drive). This has to be a corrupt bios.

Also, I have tried creating a hirans bootable USB...the computer wont boot from it. I will try creating a windows bootable usb and see what happens

 

UPDATE 2

I have created a bootable Windows 8.1 USB, set the BIOS to boot from USB key, however the laptop will not boot from it (just keeps coming up with a hanging screen showing same windows logo as before.

Is there a way to flash the bios without having to boot system?

Is there a way to clear the cmos? (ie where are the cmos jumpers on this laptop?)

 

kind regards

Adam


Edited by adamjedgar, 20 August 2016 - 09:56 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,127 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:04:46 PM

Posted 21 August 2016 - 08:19 AM

Your mention of a "virus" seems to have no substance, since you state that you have reformatted/reinstalled Windows.

 

Topic moved from AII to Internal Hardware where others may explore the functional status of the hard drive mentioned.

 

Louis



#3 adamjedgar

adamjedgar
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:46 AM

Posted 22 August 2016 - 01:08 AM

Hi Louis,

a couple of queries...

1. the machine wont boot to either hdd or USB. What would be the reason for this?

2. I have had an infection in the bios or cmos on another machine in the past. Could this be the problem on this machine as well considering the above point?



#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,127 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:04:46 PM

Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:13 PM

Using words and phrases like "could", "possibly" and "virus" in a topic...often sound to me like undeducated, desperate attempts by members to give a name to something which they do not understand.

 

I suppose...it could be a virus.

 

I suppose...it could be a hardware issue.

 

I suppose...it could be any number of random occurrences in this universe that we haven't even thought of.

 

One thing we do know...a failded HD diagnostic which is not misinterpreted...is, at the very best, a warning to the owner/user of said drive.  At the very worst, it's the HD equivalent of "Rest In Peace" as pronounced by the doctor or the priest.

 

To pretend otherwise...isn't going to change the functional status of the system...not as long as you are using that particular hard drive in it.

 

IMO...you also seem to be ruling out that the hard drive has fellow components which result in your situation.  Members often with that there is only one thing wrong with the systems they have...but there is no guarantee that you don't have multiple aspects of your system which need some examination.

 

This topic was moved here to explore that possibility...not to answer questions re "possible malware".  The Internal Hardware forum...deals with Internal Hardware.  Let's assume that all further posts in this topic...will flow along those lines and forget any concept of "malware/virus/demons, etc.".

 

If we can do that, someone here may be able to help you solve what appears to be a puzzle to you..

 

Louis



#5 adamjedgar

adamjedgar
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:46 AM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 02:24 AM

hi Louis,

thanks for your reply.

In order to avoid the "you haven't a clue lines" in the future perhaps it may be useful to outline my past and why I am "DIYing" this problem (I apologise if this seems long winded)

 

Whilst I don't do it every day, in 2003/4 I did spend about 6 months full time in formal study in basic computer hardware, networking, and then a further 2 years part time in database administration. Prior to that, from 93 until 98, I completed a university Education degree in Industrial Technology and Design (hence my "elementary interest" in computer hardware, graphics, CAD, CAM, and electronics amongst almost a whole host of other things) Since those times I have always assembled my own desktop pcs and a number for relatives from scratch. My current hobby/part time income (outside of regular business commitments in Home Renovations and in Earthmoving) is building websites and web hosting. I am a reseller for Synergy Wholesale Australia.

 

Having said the above, I do not have any experience with the internal workings of laptops...I have tended to give them a wide berth. 

 

So why did I get into the "guts" of one now? 

 

I have taken an interest in 3D printing and building and configuring Kobo E-Readers to use with XCSoar - a flight software gliders and paragliders use (I am a keen flier of paramotors and paragliders). I broke the screen on my kobo flight computer a couple of weeks ago and am in the process of installing a new one. This was the catalyst for pulling the HP DV6 Pavillion laptop out of almost 3 years of mothballs and have a crack at fixing it.

 

 

My reason for asking the forum is that, when problem solving, I have never had a computer system that will not boot from at least one of the following;

1. DVD/CDD-rom

2. USB

3. HDD

 

I have always managed to get at least one of the above working in order to sort any virus, hardware, or software issues out.

 

We can run around HDD all day and it may very well be the problem, however, why can I not at least boot from the DVD or USB with bootable software contain on them? Is this inability to boot from another device a normal thing to expect from a failed HDD?

 

kind regards,

Adam 


Edited by adamjedgar, 23 August 2016 - 02:25 AM.


#6 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,127 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:04:46 PM

Posted 23 August 2016 - 01:25 PM

Inability to boot from any device...would say to me a number of things.

 

  a.  I may have a PSU or motherboard problem.  I might even have a CMOS battery problem, if there is evidence of unusual BSODs attributed to hardware...system clock cannot keep correct time...BIOS settings are not stable/effective.

 

  b.  If aystem is laptop, I may have some other hardware problem which I don't have the expertise to troublehoot.

 

  c.  If system is not a desktop, I take it to a shop or resign myself to replacing the laptop.  They are dirt cheap these days and (IMO) are not intended to have an extended lifetime.

 

There are other more knowledgeable members in this forum...who may be able to suggest something to you...but I'm not one of them.

 

Louis



#7 adamjedgar

adamjedgar
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:46 AM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 04:53 AM

a little googling found the following...

 

what are the chances I have this issue? (considering, a few days ago machine was able to boot correctly, however progressively and relatively quickly it got to the point where now I cannot get my laptop to boot from HDD, USB, or DVD)

 

If it was a hardware failure, surely it would have been a yes or no issue...not one that got worse over a number of uses over a period of about 1 week?

 

Seems to me that I am going to have to problem solve this the old fashioned way. I will let you know how I go if and when I resolve this issue. If I find the solution it will be a learning experience for this forum as well as myself.

 

kind regards

Adam



#8 bludgard

bludgard

  • Members
  • 934 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No Clue Whatsoever, Western Hemishere
  • Local time:04:46 PM

Posted 24 August 2016 - 01:31 PM

Is this inability to boot from another device a normal thing to expect from a failed HDD?

Although rare in my experience, a failing/failed HDD absolutely can cause the system to not boot from other devices: Try disconnecting the HDD from your system and boot from FD, CD/DVD etc.

 


Edited by bludgard, 24 August 2016 - 01:32 PM.


#9 adamjedgar

adamjedgar
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:46 AM

Posted 16 September 2016 - 06:55 AM

Hi guys,

I just thought that i would come back to you all with the solution to the above problem with HP DV6 Pavillion laptop.

 

The short version (For those who don't like reading)

 

The original virus had caused/contributed too surface damage to a number of sectors on the mechanical HDD...so even though i had gotten rid of the virus, the bad sectors on the HDD remained further confusing the issue and prompting the suggestion that the drive was "RS" and should be replaced.

 

I performed a Diskpart repair on the drive (which writes 0's and 1's to the drive and repairs bad sectors). I then formated to the type suitable for Windows and my Laptop BIOS capabilities UEFI (I used GPT format type). It now has absolutely "0" bad sectors on it (I ran the surface test on the drive 2 times on both the desktop pc and again on the laptop using its BIOS utilities...it passed with flying colours on each occasion)

 

The moral of the story (aside from don't get a virus in the first place by downloading suspect software and/or files)...Before throwing away good hardware, ensure that all reasonable methods of checking/assessing serviceability are completed correctly before throwing said hardware away. This one piece of vital information (zero out using Diskpart utility) would have sorted my problem out within just a few hours.

 

 

The longer version (my favorite)

 

Essentially what happened was as follows:

1. The computer got a virus some time back and i never really ever got rid of the file that caused it in the first place (i simply created a new user profile and archived the old one and all its documents and settings).

In not deleting all of the old profile files (because they were files i needed at the time), i always ran the risk of inadvertently accessing the corrupt one at some point in the future...and since i wasnt really sure exactly which file the suspect one was (although i had a fair idea), there was a likelihood that things could go south again (which is what happened).

2. I figured that the problem was a stuffed video card or screen (because the only symptom was a sudden blank screen) and so began to pull the laptop apart...very quickly losing interest and into the dottom drawer of my desk it went for 2 years.

3. I broke a screen on my Kobo mini and fixing the kobo inspired me to pull the laptop out and have a go at fixing it too. I couldnt remember exactly what was wrong so i simply put it back together (as stated earlier) and was surprised to see it work for a time.

4. My suspicions of a virus issue were quickly aroused when i saw a rapid spiral downhill into a non working laptop again.

5. Surface testing of the HDD showed a significant number of damaged sectors (enough for BIOS utilities to determine it was a "bad drive")

6. I zeroed out the drive using a different computer (inserted the drive into a desktop pc). I used the built in command line Diskpart method in Windows 10 as outlined by microsoft technet

 

How to use Diskpart in Windows to Zero Out Your Hard Drive

One easy way to zero out your hard drive, i.e., writing zeros to your hard drive to wipe out any data is to use Diskpart.exe, a utility that is shipped on every Microsoft Windows Installation CD.

Here are the step-by-step instructions on how to use Diskpart:
a. Insert your Windows CD into the optical drive and boot into a command prompt.
b. Type diskpart to load the utility.
c. Type list disk. Diskpart will list all the hard drive(s) on your computer.
d. Type select disk x (where x=the number of the disk you want to zero out). Diskpart will return "Disk x is now the selected disk."
e. Type clean all and Diskpart will completely zero out the entire disk.

 

7. Reformatted drive GPT, and then surface tested it on the second pc

8. Once satisfied surface testing was good, i then reinstalled the hdd into the HP Laptop (I DID NOT START LAPTOP UP AT THIS POINT)

9.  Laptop BIOS was reset - i had to remove laptop battery, and disconnect power, then hold down the power button for 15 seconds to drain all residue power from the memory, reconnected battery and power, started up laptop (went immediately into BIOS manually again resetting it to HP defaults and checking clock was correct)

11. Installed a fresh copy of Windows 8.1 (x64 Full version) ...note i did not choose the upgrade option when installing

12. System is now running perfectly again.

 

I am now going to buy a new HDD anyway, not because this one isnt any good, but because the computer has an I7-720QM CPU @ 1.6 gHz (which isnt particularly fast by today's standards). I hope to improve its speed noticeably by exchanging the existing mechanical drive with either a hybrid or an SSD.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users