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How can I bypass the Windows login on my computer to get onto the desktop?


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#1 3peasinapod

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 12:20 PM

Hi all - I'm brand new to this forum and I'm wondering whether anyone could please help me.

 

My son was using his computer (Alienware Alpha) last night and decided to download a Windows 10 update.  He then tried to login this morning but when he went to input his Windows password, it told him it was incorrect.  We created a new password using a different computer and, although it tells me that password change was successful, when my son tries to login to his PC, it won't accept it.

 

He's totally stuck because he can't get past the Windows login screen.  I tried F8 on startup but I couldn't see anything that would help.  What we need to do is bypass the Windows login and go straight onto the desktop.  Does anyone know whether that is possible and, if so, how I go about doing it?  

 

My son has a physical disability so his computer is his lifeline and he's totally devastated.  Please, let me know if you can help.

 

Thanks guys x


Edited by Queen-Evie, 20 August 2016 - 12:25 PM.
moved from Windows 10 Discussion to Windows 10 Support


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#2 dhjohns

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 02:53 PM

First make sure caps lock is not on. Is this a Microsoft Account, or a local account? If it is a Microsoft Account, you can change password on another computer. Sounds like you did. Make sure you are using email address of Microsoft Account for name, and the correct password. Also try using the number keys at the top of the keyboard, or if they don't work the number keys on the side of the keyboard. You can also try switching keyboards, or if it is a laptop, plugging in a different one.

Edited by dhjohns, 20 August 2016 - 02:57 PM.


#3 britechguy

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 04:05 PM

Just to add on to dhjohns' post, it would be helpful to know if the prior version of Windows was 8/8.1 and, if so, whether he logged in using a local account or a Microsoft account.

 

On Windows 7 upgrades I have yet to have any issues with the local accounts that already existed or with their passwords being changed.

 

Also, be aware that even if you are using a Microsoft Account to log in, and it sounds like you are, that the password on the Microsoft Account at the Microsoft website and the password on the local machine do NOT sync by default.  My password on this Windows 10 machine remains precisely what it's always been even though I have reset my Microsoft Account password on the Microsoft site.  Definitely try doing a restart (not a shutdown, but a restart to make the OS load from scratch) and try the password he'd always been using first to see if it might take it.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 3peasinapod

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 10:20 AM

Thanks guys for your help.  Brian, my son has an Alienware Alpha PC which was preinstalled with Windows 10 when we bought it 4 months ago.  Because we set up Windows login for him, he's locked out of the computer because it won't recognise the passwords.  I restarted it and pressed F12 and ran a system check and everything is okay with the PC, it hasn't been compromised.  The only problem is with Windows login.  I tried to make contact with an online company via the Microsoft website and they started saying that there was nothing wrong with Windows and that the computer mustn't be running correctly and that they could fix the problem for me but it would cost me £90.  I just can't help feeling that there must be a way to bypass the login so I can access the computer.  



#5 Queen-Evie

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 10:41 AM

For those more knowledgeable than I am, would booting into safe mode and trying a system restore be worth trying?
Would a sign in be required for safe mode if one has to sign in with normal mode?

#6 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 11:17 AM

Queen-Evie,

 

           Using a system repair disc, booting from it, and trying a system restore, either from a full backup, if available, or to a restore point prior to the update is an excellent idea.  It may or may not work in terms of the final result, but it is something worth trying.  There are lots of articles out there on booting into Safe Mode under Windows 10 depending on what your circumstances of access happen to be.  I generally find it much easier to boot from alternate media as that tends to give you administrator access from the get-go.

 

            As it so happens, someone posted what might be a potentially helpful last ditch hack if one loses all other access methods on a Windows box, up to and including Windows 10.  I do not believe pointing this out violates any BleepingComputer rules since this can be used for legitimate purposes.  If it does, please feel free to edit this post to remove this paragraph.  I just wanted others to be aware of an option that had been entirely unknown to me (and, for complete clarity, I have not tried it, either, as I have never had the need).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 Queen-Evie

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 12:52 PM

You do have to jump through hoops to boot Windows 10 in safe mode.

http://www.digitalcitizen.life/4-ways-boot-safe-mode-windows-10 shows you how.

What I suggest is for you to try Option 2 first. It is a process but should get you into safe mode.

Safe mode looks different in Windows 10.

If successful you will see Safe Mode and the Windows build version at the top of your desktop.
FTefeEO.png

After you get in to Safe Mode, you can then try System Restore.

Getting to it in Windows 10 is also a jump through hoops process.

So to make it easy:

RIGHT click in an empty space of the bottom toolbar.

Choose TASK MANAGER.

After Task Manager opens, click FILE/Run new task.

Enter rstrui in the box, click OK.

System Restore will open.

Choose your restore point to a time just before the issue started. You may have to check Show more restore points.

You can choose to see what will be affected by using a particular restore point. Please do this-the update he did will be listed under Programs and drivers that will deleted. This will (we hope) be the one he installed. This is the restore point you choose to use.

Follow the prompts.

When finished, you can re-start. Hopefully it will work.
If it does, when he gets to his desktop there a message will say if it was or was not.

Note: this only works if there are restore points to choose from.

If unsure of the update name, go to Start/Settings/Update & Security/Windows Update/Update history to see if it is listed there along with the date is was installed.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 21 August 2016 - 01:03 PM.


#8 dhjohns

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:20 PM

She can't get into safe mode without a password.

#9 Queen-Evie

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:42 PM

Thank you for that information, dhjohns.

That's why I said I don't know if one is needed for safe mode. Makes sense that it would be if using the same account to access safe mode.






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