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Migrating from Windows 7 to Ubuntu


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#1 DSTY

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:19 PM

I am planning to move to Ubuntu 16.04 and there are some few things which is confusing. Is it okay to instant flash BIOS in Windows 7 before installing Ubuntu? Does Linux automatically detects hardware drivers and install it on its own without needing to download from the manufacturer's website? Is Linux better to stress test hardware? Do I have to do some specific things in Windows 7 before moving to Ubuntu excluding data backup?

 

ASRock B85M Pro4. 280x. PX-128M3. WD10EZEX


Edited by DSTY, 18 August 2016 - 09:22 PM.


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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:47 PM

Hello,
You should have no problems with linux even if you flash the bios beforehand. However, what is the reason for flashing the BIOS? If it goes wrong your computer may be bricked. (Aka boat anchor syndrome)
Linux should automatically configure drivers. If something is wrong, try installing drivers from the manufacturer.

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#3 DSTY

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:51 PM

Hello,
You should have no problems with linux even if you flash the bios beforehand. However, what is the reason for flashing the BIOS? If it goes wrong your computer may be bricked. (Aka boat anchor syndrome)
Linux should automatically configure drivers. If something is wrong, try installing drivers from the manufacturer.

 

I've recently had BSOD and there were some recommendation to update it. Also is it ok to flash BIOS in Ubuntu?



#4 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:58 PM

Usually you don't flash the BIOS within linux. I used my motherboard's easy flash. But still, see if linux won't crash and if it does carefully flash the bios then.

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#5 Condobloke

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:47 PM

I would leave flashing bios alone....you are looking for trouble and will probably find it.

 

Just install Ubuntu and take it from there

 

Keep the process simple


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#6 DSTY

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:58 PM

Are there some software in Ubuntu to check for faulty hardware or should I just test it in current OS?



#7 Gary R

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 12:20 AM

If your computer will boot, then your BIOS (or UEFI on more modern machines) is OK and should not be flashed.

 

Strictly speaking BIOS/UEFI is firmware not hardware, and is a set of instructions to set the basic parameters of your computer at boot time prior to loading your OS. Once your OS has loaded, your BIOS/UEFI is to all intents and purposes redundant until you shutdown (since all its functions are now supplanted by your OS).

 

So, if you're able to boot, then you should leave it alone.

 

The vast majority of BSOD events are caused by flaky drivers, and since the drivers you will be using in Ubuntu will for the most part not be the same as you would be using if you were booting Windows, then there's a very strong possibility that any BSOD problems that you might have had with Windows will not be present in Ubuntu.

 

Have you tried running Ubuntu from a USB drive yet (before you attempt to install it on your computer) to see whether it is compatible with your hardware. If not, then I strongly recommend that you do so, as this will make no material changes to your machine, and will enable you to see whether you still have the same problems as you had before (or not as the case might be).


Edited by Gary R, 19 August 2016 - 12:20 AM.


#8 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 07:58 AM

Indeed, Ubuntu should work but if there are deeper issues well linux does have good ways to let you know that


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#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:10 AM

If your computer will boot, then your BIOS (or UEFI on more modern machines) is OK and should not be flashed.

 

....

 

So, if you're able to boot, then you should leave it alone.

 

Totally agree.

 

Like Gary mentioned as well, more than likely your crashing is going on due to driver issues. So installing Ubuntu and getting rid of Windows will help solve those issues. I would just back everything up and go on and install Ubuntu!


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#10 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:12 AM

Just keep in mind there is a learning curve in using Ubuntu but once you get used to it Ubuntu is dead on simple


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#11 DSTY

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:13 AM

If your computer will boot, then your BIOS (or UEFI on more modern machines) is OK and should not be flashed.

 

Strictly speaking BIOS/UEFI is firmware not hardware, and is a set of instructions to set the basic parameters of your computer at boot time prior to loading your OS. Once your OS has loaded, your BIOS/UEFI is to all intents and purposes redundant until you shutdown (since all its functions are now supplanted by your OS).

 

So, if you're able to boot, then you should leave it alone.

 

The vast majority of BSOD events are caused by flaky drivers, and since the drivers you will be using in Ubuntu will for the most part not be the same as you would be using if you were booting Windows, then there's a very strong possibility that any BSOD problems that you might have had with Windows will not be present in Ubuntu.

 

Have you tried running Ubuntu from a USB drive yet (before you attempt to install it on your computer) to see whether it is compatible with your hardware. If not, then I strongly recommend that you do so, as this will make no material changes to your machine, and will enable you to see whether you still have the same problems as you had before (or not as the case might be).

I have not installed nor ran Ubuntu yet. It says the latest version recommends 25 GB+ and the OS itself is about 4.5 GB so is this enough to browse the web and stream videos from NAS? Also I need to install a 10 GB Windows XP running in VirtualBox for Ubuntu. Not sure if this question relates to Linux, I am thinking of installing Windows 10 instead of Ubuntu for dual boot and there's a thread I wrote in Windows 10 forum. However as my SSD has only 128 GB, it would run out of space soon after I install some major games. Although I have 1 TB hard drive, I prefer gaming on SSD


Edited by DSTY, 19 August 2016 - 09:15 AM.


#12 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:15 AM

Well is your computer a laptop or desktop?


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#13 DSTY

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:36 AM

Well is your computer a laptop or desktop?

It's a desktop with i5-4690 running. Rest of the specs are in my first post



#14 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 10:15 AM

Well then you can use both the SSD and the regular drive.

But if you game you may wish to dual boot.


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#15 Gary R

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 12:25 PM

 

I have not installed nor ran Ubuntu yet. It says the latest version recommends 25 GB+ and the OS itself is about 4.5 GB so is this enough to browse the web and stream videos from NAS? Also I need to install a 10 GB Windows XP running in VirtualBox for Ubuntu. Not sure if this question relates to Linux, I am thinking of installing Windows 10 instead of Ubuntu for dual boot and there's a thread I wrote in Windows 10 forum. However as my SSD has only 128 GB, it would run out of space soon after I install some major games. Although I have 1 TB hard drive, I prefer gaming on SSD

 

There are others that can help you more than I can with details on how to best configure your hard drive(s), and will no doubt do so, so I'll leave them to discuss the best layout strategy with you.

 

The only thing I'll say, is that with any Linux install it's usually best to keep "system" files and "personal" files on separate partitions and/or drives.

 

 






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