Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

New Computer: Hard Drive and Cloud Storage


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Hal06

Hal06

  • Members
  • 917 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York, New York, USA
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 18 August 2016 - 04:10 PM

Hello.

 

I'm considering a new computer. My current laptop has 1T hard drive and I've used about 300 GB. One of the new computers I'm looking at is very affordable and seems to be a better machine than mine. However, I'm concerned about it's hard drive: it's only 256GB but it's SSD.

 

Is being SSD worth the loss of hard drive capacity?

 

If I purchase it a good portion of files currently on my hard drive would have to be shifted to an external drive or to cloud storage. That sounds annoying. How does the cloud storage work? What companies offer it? I suppose you don't have to back it up?

 

Any other thoughts?

 

Thanks.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 18 August 2016 - 04:16 PM

I'm assuming the machine you are looking at is another laptop.

Any reason why you would replace your current one? Depending on what kind you have you might always be able to add an additional hard drive to it (same with the one you are looking at getting).

 

As far as cloud storage, there a bunch of companies that offer plans. Google offers the most for a free account (15GB), but also have paid plans to get more space. Though honestly depending on what it is, I would just dump it on a external. Much cheaper in the long run to get a couple 1TB externals (backup purposes) then it is to pay for 1TB of cloud space.

 

Different cloud providers are DropBox, Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Box, and there is a bunch more.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#3 Hal06

Hal06
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 917 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York, New York, USA
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 18 August 2016 - 04:48 PM

Thanks.

 

Replacing the old one because it's time to do so. It's several years old.



#4 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 18 August 2016 - 05:35 PM

Hello.
 
I'm considering a new computer. My current laptop has 1T hard drive and I've used about 300 GB. One of the new computers I'm looking at is very affordable and seems to be a better machine than mine. However, I'm concerned about it's hard drive: it's only 256GB but it's SSD.
 
Is being SSD worth the loss of hard drive capacity?


That is a question that usually is only answered by the person using the computer.

SSDs will result in the computer loading programs and large data files faster, so it will seem like the computer is much faster than the same computer with a traditional hard drive. This will include boot times...i.e. the computer will boot faster than with an SSD.

Hard drives have the advantage of having a lot more storage space for the same price (i.e. you can get a 1 TB "laptop" 2.5" traditional hard drive for the price of a 256 GB 2.5" SATA SSD). So, it you need lots of storage, then you might be better served by a large hard drive. You can, of course, get larger sized SSDs, but they will cost more than the same size hard drive (Samsung does make a 4 TB 2.5" SATA SSD...it costs more than most laptops do, however...like $1500).

What is the model of the laptop you are considering? I ask because you might be able to order it customize with a larger SSD or they may already have a version with a larger SSD. And if not, then more than like you might be able to upgrade the SSD if the extra capacity is really important to you. Knowing the model of the laptop will allow use to determine if it can be ordered customized or found with a larger SSD, but also tell what kind of SSD it uses.
 

If I purchase it a good portion of files currently on my hard drive would have to be shifted to an external drive or to cloud storage. That sounds annoying. How does the cloud storage work?


Depends on the cloud storage option you pick. And what kind of files you want to "off load" to the cloud. Some cloud services are more generic in nature. Some are more specific such as for music or photos or for backing up files on your computer.

The most popular "generic" ones such as Dropbox, Box, Google Drive, and OneDrive are more intended to work as syncing type cloud storage rather as just as additional storage space. As a result, if used that way, whatever is stored on the cloud storage is also on your computer.

You can, however, modify this behavior to have any of these service NOT sync files to your computer and behave more like just additional storage space. You can do this by NOT installing their computer app and only accessing the service by way of the website...or you could still install their computer app but turn off syncing for most of the files and then access those files that aren't being synced just by the webpage (this would allow you to gain some of the syncing benefit for critical files, which is kind of like a backup of those files on your computer).

If you have a bunch of music files, then you could look at a music oriented cloud service such as Amazon Music (paid), Google Music (free), iTunes Match (paid). Such services will either "match" songs that they have on their service to songs in your library or actually allow you to upload songs to the cloud. You then can stream those songs to any streaming device (that supports that service).

There are also cloud photo services.

I will note that obvious potential issue with cloud services, which is if you don't have Internet access, then you don't have access to those files.

What companies offer it?


As kind of mentioned by DeimosChaos, there are lots of options. He mentioned the more popular "generic" ones. Most offer some free storage (varies from service to service), but none that is large enough for your apparent excess files. So, you likely would be looking at paying for the capacity you needed. In that vein, I will note that if you pay for an Office 365 subscription, then you get 1 TB of OneDrive storage.

I suppose you don't have to back it up?


Yes and no.

Technically, any files stored on a cloud service should be backed up as part of that cloud service's backup process. So, in theory they are being backed up by them and one could argue that you don't need to do it.

BUT, you are completely reliant on them. If the files get corrupted on their service, they are not necessarily obligated to restore those files from a back up unless it specifically says so in their terms and conditions...and even then enforcing that might be a real pain.

And there is the issue of if the company goes out of business all of a sudden with little to no notice. If so, your files are gone if you don't have a backup. While that not likely to happen with one of the large, well know providers listed above, it has happened with smaller cloud/online services.

Then this is the notion that more backups you have the better off you are. So, even if you count their backing up their servers as a backup, it is still a good idea to do your own backups of those files stored on a cloud service (which happens automatically if you use the sync approach that services such as DropBox intend you to do).

So, I would back up.
 

Any other thoughts?
 
Thanks.


Personally, like DeimosChaos, I would tend to recommend using an external drive (or maybe a second internal drive if the laptop supports that as some do). This will keep at least one copy of those files in your physical possession. You could also then back them up to the cloud (there are cloud services that specialize in just backing up to the cloud) or upload them to a typical cloud service like Dropbox, etc.

#5 Hal06

Hal06
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 917 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York, New York, USA
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 18 August 2016 - 07:17 PM

Acer 15.6" Aspire E5-575-521W Notebook

#6 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 19 August 2016 - 12:25 AM

Acer 15.6" Aspire E5-575-521W Notebook


I could not find any way to order it customized and I did not find any similar model with a larger SSD included. Thus, it seems like your only option would be to upgrade the drive after purchase.

From what I could find, that model appears to use a typical 2.5" laptop drive. Thus, if you wanted, you could always buy a bigger 2.5" SSD to put in the computer after you purchased it if you decided you want more storage. You can get a nominally 500 GB (might be 480 GB or 500 GB depending on brand) SSD for about $120 on the low end up to over $200 if you wanted something like a Samsung 850 Pro. Add in another $20 to $50 to buy a USB external enclosure to put the 256 GB drive in to use as an external drive...if you want.

#7 Hal06

Hal06
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 917 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York, New York, USA
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 17 October 2016 - 11:31 AM

This one is more than I had hoped to pay but it appears to have a small solid state drive with a 1T internal hard drive as well. That's interesting. I could put my operating software on the solid state drive and documents, etc on the hard drive. That way I would not have to carry an external drive when I traveled.

 

https://www.google.com/shopping/product/144807307750335376/specs?biw=1366&bih=631&q=laptop+1TB+hard+drive+250gb+Solid+state+drive&bav=on.2,or.&bvm=bv.135974163,d.cWw&tch=1&ech=1&psi=xPMEWNLnOYW3-AGX2oigDg.1476719557143.9&prds=paur:ClkAsKraXzQq_YWfHyVI4-ObOLbcakPxALFwy5yi06l-2pCOTyq0K9Je-gJeJ8Aa_sotKq28fqwBvntHVOO_ymmk964HsCs5n7ThlQD5_aKfLUpwPVfV8aALwxIZAFPVH73DqqPDOGTLk6rZS9DZwmx6CTRNQw&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiFl-_-muLPAhVsxoMKHTLKAnMQ6iQIrQE

 

Any cheaper versions of this? Does this laptop have anything on it that I don't really need?

 

Thanks.



#8 Hal06

Hal06
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 917 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York, New York, USA
  • Local time:06:32 AM

Posted 27 October 2016 - 10:57 AM

how does this one compare to the one above? this one is available locally.

 

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1265332-REG/msi_gl62_6qf_1278_15_6_gl62_series_notebook.html



#9 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:05:32 AM

Posted 28 October 2016 - 08:02 PM

how does this one compare to the one above? this one is available locally.
 
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1265332-REG/msi_gl62_6qf_1278_15_6_gl62_series_notebook.html


The one linked to here will have more RAM and better graphics and appears to be more expensive (not account for possible shipping charges for the previously linked Samsung). The previously linked Samsung will have a slightly better processor for most situations and be slimmer and lighter and will be slightly cheaper unless shipping is expensive (at least based upon the price listed with your link).




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users