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Running a lot of duplicate processes


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#1 Joekenda

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 06:11 PM

I am having an issue with svchost.exe having 13 sessions open and chrome.exe running double that. I windows 10 pro.

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#2 usasma

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 08:24 PM

That's normal for svchost.exe

The number for Chrome should be around the number of tabs that are open (plus a few for unknown reasons - I don't use Chrome).


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:25 AM

Just confirming that what the original poster observed, and John confirmed, is absolutely normal (and for Chrome, at least, not just under Windows 10 - I use it on a routine basis and have never figured out what their architecture is such that it runs as many processes as it does).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#4 CKing123

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 11:15 PM


I use it on a routine basis and have never figured out what their architecture is such that it runs as many processes as it does).

This is due to sandboxing (which is a great security feature)! If an attacker uses a vulnerability or an exploit, they can't do much at all. For example, they can't access any files, can't make any network requests (since that is handled by a different process), and so on. These are enforced by the Windows kernel, which is why Chrome has fared much better against Adobe Flash exploits where the exploit can't put the malware on the system. Each of the tabs, plugins, and extensions are in their own sandboxed processes, and a few other internal things about the browser (like the GPU process which allows hardware acceleration) :)

 

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#5 JW0914

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 12:41 PM

If one wishes to manage the processes for chrome, chrome comes with a built-in task manager which will allow you to match the process to it's tab/extension, as well as see it's memory consumption, multiple viewable statistics for each process, and the ability to end chrome processes

 

Menu -> More Tools -> Task Manager or simply press Shift+Esc


Edited by JW0914, 20 August 2016 - 12:44 PM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 04:08 PM

Thanks CKing123 and JW0914.  I never knew either of these things and it's great to have the additional depth of information.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#7 Guest_Bobo47_*

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 02:51 PM

I also have multiple chrome processes when running Google Chrome,I have 8 processes.Which is also normal but in such situations note that multple processes of the same program is not a good sigh as it is an indication that the program process has been hijacked and injected with malicious software.



#8 JW0914

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 02:56 PM

@Bobo47 I don't believe that's possible with Chrome, as every extension and tab is sandboxed.  The amount of processes one has in Task Manager is directly related to how many tabs are open and active extensions enabled.

 

As I mentioned in my previous reply, while Windows Task Manager will only show "chrome.exe", the Chrome Task Manager will display exactly what each process is (i.e. what tab and what extension)

  • To access the Chrome Task Manager:
    • Menu -> More Tools -> Task Manager
    • OR
    • Simply press Shift+Esc

Edited by JW0914, 29 August 2016 - 03:02 PM.


#9 britechguy

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 03:03 PM

It is well known that Chrome runs multiple processes as part of its normal way of running, though I had not known why until this thread.  There is nothing suggestive of corruption or hijacking in this at all.

 

I have 40 tabs open as I'm typing and at least that many Chrome background processes running.  There look to be a few more as I use things like the Common Hangouts add-on which can trigger Chrome process instances of its own.

 

I just opened the Chrome Task Manager and there's one "master" chrome process, one process for each tab, and a number of additional ones for the various extensions I use.


Edited by britechguy, 29 August 2016 - 03:07 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#10 JW0914

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 03:17 PM

@britechguy  I use to have well over 40 running until I realized each extension creates it's own separate process, so I narrowed down the list of my most used extensions to ~12 and disabled all others.  While it was never enough to affect RAM since I have 32GB, it did provide a subtle boost in processor performance.  I then re-enable extensions as needed, disabling them again once I've utilized them.

  • For example, I have four different "clean print" types of extensions (each has pros and cons the others don't have), however I only leave one main one enabled and when I need to de-clutter a webpage printout, I'll re-enable the other 3, figure out which one lays out the content the best, print, then re-disable the three.

I'm not sure if you've ever heard of the OneTab extension, but it's one of the best extensions for users with a lot of webpages open.  I recommend it to everyone I can, as it's extremely handy since I'll save and lock certain groups of tabs on the OneTab start page.  

  • The only feature it's missing is the ability to sync to your google account, however this can be overcome by copying it's folder from the user's google userdata [within appdata] folder and copying it into the same folder on another device, or save it as a backup. 

Edited by JW0914, 29 August 2016 - 03:22 PM.





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