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New PC Build with Linux Mint 18! Ideas Apreciated


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 04:37 AM

I've been wanting to do this since 2013, though at the time the funding wasn't there, and had to settle on a not too shabby Dell XPS 8700 for $699.99 at Costco. After all, it shipped with a still today Top 5 Common CPU in the i7-4770, 12GB DDR3-1600 RAM, a 1GB GDDR5 GPU, and 460W PSU, with room for expansion. Oh, and Windows 8. No way could I had done an i7 build for that price, and that holds true today, the i7-4790K that will be used was almost half of that cost alone. 

 

The problem though, is that OEM computers has bottlenecks. Not that we can get rid of everyone, yet with a self build, many more than an OEM one. So here I am 3 years later & still have the burning desire to build, even though I have numerous computers at my disposal. First off, let me make one point, and will keep this part short & simple, it's going to dual boot Windows 8.1 & Linux Mint 18. The first OS is for information only, should I need assistance with 8.1, will post there. We're going to be discussing a Linux Mint 18 install on a new self built PC, my first ever from new components. :guitar:

 

So w/out further ado, lets look at what I've already purchased for the build. :)

 

Safety is the First part of the Job, and with that in mind, a $6.99 Rosewill Anti-Static cable is a must have for working inside any computer. While I have one, it's getting worn, and recently, my kitty get hold of it when I laid it down with her in here. :P

 

https://www.amazon.com/Rosewill-Anti-Static-Components-RTK-002-Yellow/dp/B004N8ZQKY

 

No self build PC designed for power will be worth the effort w/out a strong CPU, and have already broken this one in, though not at full potential. Because the XPS 8700's MB only has a single 4 pin power connector for a CPU. That's going to be fixed with this build, so here comes Devil's Canyon! :thumbsup:  

 

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-BX80646I74790K-i7-4790K-Processor-Cache/dp/B00KPRWAX8

 

A good build should start with a high quality case, and though this is labeled as a 'mid tower', so is the XPS 8700. However, it's half again as large, so Dell must had misrepresented, a micro or mini tower instead. This is a great case for $99 ($20 off) & an excellent first time builder's choice. Fractal Design is also a premier brand, beginning to push themselves up against Antec & others where there's many complaints in regards to missing or broken components, sharp edges & more. I chose this one because of the ratings, and spent more time on the case decision than any other component. :thumbup2:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Fractal-Design-Define-R5-Black/dp/B00Q2Z11QE

 

Of course, any decent PC should have a quality PSU, inferior models can take a lot with it, and has been known to start fires. Here's the one I purchased, and it's my 2nd, have the same model in my ASRock build am now on (unfortunately PSU specs doesn't show). 650W Gold, fully modular PSU with more cables than I'll ever use. EVGA also provides a 7 year warranty with their 'G2' series. The price has also jumped by $20 since the last one, though as I recall, was on promo. A whisper quiet PSU. :)

 

https://www.amazon.com/EVGA-SuperNOVA-Modular-Warranty-220-G2-0650-Y1/dp/B0106RDIN2

 

Lets move onto the heart & soul of the PC, the MB. While I could had spent $100 for a few more features, I didn't see the need. for my use. The ASUS Z97-PRO GAMER is a highly regarded motherboard for it's price & features. There was only one other brand that I considered, and went with the heart on this one. :heart:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Asus-Motherboard-Z97-PRO-GAMER-S1150/dp/B00PT5E32M

 

The other that I considered, details below as to why I chose the ASUS. It's probably a very good MB for the price, I just didn't want a repeat of the same issue covered near the end of this OP. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/ASRock-DDR3-Motherboards-Z97-EXTREME6/dp/B00K6JKRIA

 

Moving on, what good is having space for 32GB & not stuff it full? Purchased two 16GB sets of these GSkill Aegis modules, which I'm now running in the XPS 8700, have ran MemTest for 12 hours with zero errors. Another point I'd like to make, that way too many doesn't consider, there's no such thing as too much (or wasted) RAM. In other words, if one has a MB capable of running 64GB (especially DDR4), stuff it, the system will use the RAM & the more, the better multitasking. In fact, the PC I'm on will hold four 16GB modules for 64GB Total, yet it's a budget rebuild of a computer donated to me. Everything except the case & one HDD has been replaced, though some were extra components on hand, including the 12GB RAM removed from the XPS 8700 (see 2nd PC in my sig for details). 

 

So here's the 32GB RAM purchased, in two sets. :thumbsup:

 

https://www.amazon.com/G-SKILL-F3-1600C11D-16GIS-240-Pin-1600MHz-Desktop/dp/B00GK9RR2Y

 

Wireless & BT are popular than ever these days, and though purchased for this build, am installing in the new instead. Far better than a USB stick, and uses a PCI slot, plus a USB header for BT power, which may be optional for some, although BT now has many uses. The ASUS AC dual band PCIe card also includes Intel Wireless Display (better know as Intel Wi-Di). :)

 

https://www.amazon.com/802-11ac-Wireless-AC1200-Bluetooth-Adapter-PCE-AC55BT/dp/B01FL6SY5A

 

Next comes HDD/SSD security on the hardware level. Software security of drives can be more easily cracked or even buggy (example Bitlocker). Everything is dependent on that 100MiB system partition with W7, 350MiB on 8.1 & 500MiB on W10. Forget securing with partitions, as long as nothing fries the TPM, one's on business. Good backup software can auto unlock encrypted drives for recovery when needed for that purpose only. Linux Mint & other Ubuntu OS's can use a Trusted Platform Module or TPM. Again, it's an ASUS brand, and one has to stick with the same brand as the MB. It's much higher rated on Amazon in 2nd link. 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Asus-Accessory-TPM-FW3-19-BitLocker/dp/B0085E4WQQ

 

Now comes some optional accessories. Though seldom used, it's still good to have an optical drive, also by chance an ASUS brand (NO LOGO). I have two of the same that's been around for 6+ years in 2nd link, other than that the specs are the same. Due to Forum Rules, I cannot provide links to the Newegg site for these, as both has promo codes. Though here's the same one on Amazon that's going in the new build (if I don't like it, will swap for another I have). 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Asus-DVD-Writer-DRW-24F1ST-BLK-GEN/dp/B00GXAQ3DE

 

Here's the one I've purchased twice in the past, except for the label, is the same (44x Winner Customer Choice Award on Newegg for Optical drives).

 

https://www.amazon.com/Asus-Serial-ATA-Internal-Optical-DRW-24B1ST/dp/B0033Z2BAQ

 

PWM Fan Splitter cable commonly used by many, I ordered two.

 

https://www.amazon.com/SilverStone-Technology-Sleeved-Splitter-CPF01/dp/B00B46XKKQ

 

And some extra case fans, a 4 pack for $7.49 after rebate isn't bad for 120mm Cooler Master fans that's well reviewed. :)

 

https://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Bearing-Computer-Radiators/dp/B000O8I474

 

Now, for the time being, will be using one of my SSD's for the install, may be the 180GiB Intel 330 or 256GiB Crucial M550 SSD, as well as a MSI branded nVidia GTX 960 will be in the PC. Very soon, these two upscale components will be installed, and the 512GiB Samsung 950 Pro M.2 blows SATA-3 SSD in a dust cloud. :thumbsup:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-950-PRO-Internal-MZ-V5P512BW/dp/B01639694M

 

This component by Addonics will allow me to install in a x4 slot. The native M.2 slot won't be as fast. Also, this is why I had to make a tough decision with the MB, ASRock has one (I believe Extreme6) with a M.2 slot that is nearly as fast w/out using a x4 slot, though still it's coming from somewhere. My problem with ASRock is the SATA ports on the MB I'm on, there's a fragile feel to them, moves easily. I don't know if that's by design or if they didn't use enough epoxy to secure these better. What I didn't want was a repeat of the same. Plus I have a gut feeling for the price ($104.99 after rebate), the item in the link above is 'too good to be true' in the long haul, that's a lot to offer for the price. Heat of a M.2 SSD installed on the MB is also an issue, just like with mSATA, and x4 is really pushing it. 

 

Anyway, here's the x4 bracket, of which there's a x4 slot of the MB to hold it.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Addonics-ADM2PX4-Pcie-4-lane-Adapter/dp/B00KDM75XK

 

And finally, last, but not least, this beast of a graphics card. :guitar:

 

https://www.amazon.com/EVGA-GeForce-Adjustable-Graphics-08G-P4-6276-KR/dp/B01I60OGUK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1469148618&sr=8-2&keywords=08G-P4-6276-KR

 

Some of these links had to be changed due to Newegg codes showing, though most of us all knew what 'FTW' meant long ago (For the Win)  :P, and EVGA is proving it with their version of the GeForce 1070, 8GB GDDR5 VRAM, overclocked out of the box with room for more, will blow the doors way on many cards less than a year old that cost $400 more, and 3x the performance of the GTX 970, using less power to get there. I verified the the P/N was the same, and the linked card is as on Amazon

 

No wonder why one author called these cards (the 1080 & 1070) 'irresponsible performance'. Like the RAM, there's no such thing as 'too much'. :P

 

Well, I believe everything is covered on my end, what do you all think? :)

 

All suggestions are welcome! :thumbup2:

 

EDIT: Some Links had to be changed to comply with Bleeping Computer site rules in regards to Discount Codes! So I changed them all to Amazon ones to avoid future issues. Look to the right, there are multiple sellers on Amazon, some still offers free shipping on items. Read reviews from 3rd party sellers before purchasing. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 October 2016 - 01:26 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 04:45 AM

With that much ram you do not need swap, and setting swappiness to 10 or even 0 might be a good idea



#3 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 04:53 AM

I agree, am running at 1 on both my XPS 8700 & this PC. :thumbup2:

 

It was a tip on one of those 'first things to do' after Linux Mint/Ubuntu install sites, if there was an SSD installed, go with 1 to save wear & tear. I've had no problems with that setting to date. 

 

Oh and about Swap itself, I believe you're right on that, just makes the RAM lazy. Why shift Swap from the fastest storage I have (RAM) to a storage drive? Makes no sense. I also don't understand why VMware wants 4GB Swap, when I've checked & it uses none. Maybe I should disable the showing of those errors & run w/out Swap. Nothing to lose. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 15 August 2016 - 04:59 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 05:18 AM

Happens that I forgot to post some proof of what I've purchased above, sorry about that! Credibility is a must. :)

 

uam4mm8.jpg

 

t45Lgfz.jpg

 

cWgAaL7.jpg

 

UgUMjCa.jpg

 

TjZMODg.jpg

 

Tdj9M82.jpg

 

I have to remove the CPU from the XPS 8700 it's in, though here's a pic of the Intel Core i7-4790K box with the Dell i7-4770 & heatsink stored in safely. :)

 

TBVGU9w.jpg

 

Have left everything in the boxes until at least more item gets here, the TPM linked above. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 NickAu

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 06:02 AM

Re SSD
 

 

Depending on the SSD product, some are already over-provisioned by the manufacturer and users cannot access and control
it.

http://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/downloads/document/Samsung_SSD_845DC_04_Over-provisioning.pdf

 

Before doing any over-provisioning check to make sure its not been done by the factory.

 

If you are dual booting with Win 8 or 10 Install Linux beside Windows with secure boot on, Its easy and all you have to do is change boot order using efibootmgr in live mode.


Edited by NickAu, 15 August 2016 - 06:05 AM.


#6 DeimosChaos

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 01:36 PM

Man that i7 makes my i5 feel so old and outdated... (mine came out in Q1 of '11). I want a new CPU/MB but don't feel that it is necessary at the moment.

Nice looking build Cat, I doubt you will have much issues with it. Should be able to do just about anything you want. Maybe a game or two to flex the GPU? Run 4 or so VM's... just because you can? Sounds like a good time. :)

 

Also... why couldn't you post the link to newegg for the GPU? I'm not aware of that rule...


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 01:39 PM

 

Before doing any over-provisioning check to make sure its not been done by the factory.

 

 

That, I'll have to check on, because premium brands does tend to have 'inaccessible' storage built in, usually at least 10% more. 

 

 

If you are dual booting with Win 8 or 10 Install Linux beside Windows with secure boot on, Its easy and all you have to do is change boot order using efibootmgr in live mode.

 

 

That'll be new to me, have never installed any Linux in UEFI mode, plus there's the issue of the NVMe driver that this SSD uses. Hopefully there's a Linux version of this driver. Samsung provides it for Windows 8.1 & 10, Microsoft provides it by email request, a hotfix to slipstream into the Windows 7 install media, and still requires a lot of work to pull off. Will have to find out about a Linux Mint/Ubuntu equivalent. At any rate, that driver has to be installed, otherwise it won't boot, just as with W7. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 01:41 PM

Man that i7 makes my i5 feel so old and outdated... (mine came out in Q1 of '11). I want a new CPU/MB but don't feel that it is necessary at the moment.

Nice looking build Cat, I doubt you will have much issues with it. Should be able to do just about anything you want. Maybe a game or two to flex the GPU? Run 4 or so VM's... just because you can? Sounds like a good time. :)

 

Also... why couldn't you post the link to newegg for the GPU? I'm not aware of that rule...

 

DC, the rule about not posting Newegg promo codes is on this page. :)

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forum-rules/

 

 

 

Advertisements, of any sort, are not permitted. This includes member names and links to commercial sites in Signatures, or in posts. You also may not solicit sales for Newegg through the use of promotion or coupon codes. If you would like to advertise on our site, contact us here.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 cat1092

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 02:57 PM

Does anyone have any idea of what the SATA Express (10Gb/sec) is about? 

 

I mean, I've seen this feature on many MB's in the last couple of years, beginning with Z97 models, yet haven't seen a drive produced to take advantage of these. Or is it just an implementation of USB 3.1 for backups? ASUS has the card for this & that's what it appears to be. 

 

http://www.asus.com/microsite/mb/best_usb31_solutions/

 

Seemed it would had been better to make the internal USB ports 3.1 from the beginning instead of wasting lanes by adding a card, as the solution above was provided on the ASUS page for the MB. Scroll down the page to where it says this (there's also a link near the top of the article in small print).

 

 

Instantly upgrade to ultimate-speed 10Gb/s with USB 3.1 Card

 

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/Z97PRO_GAMER/

 

And then just above that, there's an indicator of future SSD's using the ports. 

 

 

 

Evolve your storage speed with SATA Express

SATA Express provides up to 10Gbit/s data-transfer speeds from two PCI Express 2.0 lanes, so you're all set for the next generation of super-fast SSDs. Existing SSDs consume up to 550MB/s of bandwidth, which is close to the saturation point for SATA 6Gbit/s connections — but Z97-PRO GAMER's SATA Express interface smashes this through this speed barrier. Backwardly compatible with up to two SATA drives, SATA Express is the next-generation connectivity standard that ensures you and your game won't get left behind.

 

After some research, have found the solution, one has to click onto the pictures to see the cable & accessories to use with SATA-Express. Too expensive for me! :P

 

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-1-2TB-PCI-Express-Internal-SSDPE2MW012T4X1/dp/B018HKSTB6

 

While the SSD is out of my budget, still it would seem the ASUS PCIe card alone should provide faster than ever backups, even with USB 3.0 enclosures, maybe then it's limit can be pushed to the max. :)

 

My only issue with this, is that I'll already have a GPU, a x4 controller for the M.2 SSD, the PCIe network card, adding more takes lanes away, which aren't unlimited. BTW, here's an outstanding review about the ASUS Z97-Pro Gamer, which I had read before purchase. Testing was performed using the same CPU that I have. 

 

http://www.overclockers.com/asus-z97-pro-gamer-motherboard-review/

 

I feel that for the purchase price, it was an unbeatable choice for an Intel 1150 MB that should last for a long time to come. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 October 2016 - 01:29 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 cat1092

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 03:31 AM

Good News, the 512GB Samsung 950 Pro M.2 should be ordered tomorrow! :)

 

That is, as long as the check I had been expecting has cleared. It's supposed to. The remaining of the balance, I'll have to wait on a bit longer, as the awards were capped at $599.99 until a W-9 was filled out (per IRS tax rules). Once I get that, which will be more, hopefully the same version of the GeForce 1070 FTW will be available. It's the 1080/1060 models selling like hotcakes, and the stock of nVidia on the exchange has doubled since early this year. It may be that an even better 1070 FTW version will be available, though I believe that's an EVGA exclusive. No one else that taken that decades old common term (as far as I know) & marketed it as EVGA has, a bold & successful move. 

 

Is there any wonder why nVidia stock has doubled? :P

 

This GPU (for me at this price) will have to be not a 'good', rather a great one, don't want a 'budget' model, and the 1060 at $249 has just that written all over it, after all, is only $50 more than I paid for the GTX 960 about 16 months back & though a lot more powerful for the money, 'bang for the buck' isn't what I want. I only want the bang :P! The GeForce 1070 won't fail me, has the ability to run up to 7680 x 4320 resolution, HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4 (there's yet to be rolled out DP 1.3 models on a mass scale, if at all, this card will be out of warranty & outdated before we see 1.4). Yet one of the benefits of the latest DP ports, are that one can use an active DP conversion cable with HDMI at the other end to enjoy the benefits. DP is actually a higher standard than HDMI, minus the Ethernet feature, and the current DP 1.2 displays that runs at up to 144Hz are outright stunning when compared to a HDMI 1.3/1.4 display. Keeping in mind that the majority runs at 60Hz, the most immediate visual difference will be obvious, the sheer brightness, it may be hard for some with DP 1.1/HDMI 1.3 monitors to view content in the same distance (example, a new(er) 24" DP 1.2 gaming widescreen just a little over an arm length away), some may have to use a lesser spec cable to adjust, or dim the monitor. Just imagine what a step up in a DP 1.3 monitor running at more than 144Hz would look like. :thumbsup:

 

Other features are 1920 CUDA cores, Base clock: 1607 MHz, Boost Clock: 1797 MHz, 256 bit memory width (the 1060 has only 192 bit on this spec), Memory Clock of 8000 MHz, Memory Bandwidth of 256.3GB/sec (no typo, GB/sec, not Gb/sec) & DX 12, though Vulcan will likely overshadow DX in the future. Plus an entire suite of nVidia software, to include GPU Boost 3.0 & plenty 'VR ready'. 

 

I guess the immediate plans will be getting the 512GiB Samsung 950 Pro M.2 ordered, hopefully to arrive by Friday or Saturday tops. While that will be most certainly overkill for my real world needs, and I could get by & double the speed with the 256GiB version, that's not what I want. What I want is to leave 2.5" SATA SSD's in a cloud of dust! :P

 

While a lot of folks, including myself, has loosely used the term 'bang for the buck' to the point it has little meaning, I want the bang only & don't give a rat's tail about the buck! :thumbsup:

 

Plus the 512GiB Samsung 950 Pro M.2 at a much lower price, outperforms the Intel SATA Express offerings when it comes to speed, at less than half the capacity (link with details below). Looks like a common SATA-3 SSD, though if pictures are clicked on, one can see all of the components, including the needed cable to convert SATA Express, are there. Am hoping for a Linux solution for the Samsumg NVMe driver, otherwise would have to install Linux Mint 18 on a 3.5" SSD, of which much will be wasted, /home will be on a HDD (have nearly 300GiB of VM's to transfer), and at the suggestion of my colleague Nick above, there'll be no Swap unless needed, can set VMware to not show nags for this. :)

 

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-400GB-Solid-2-5-Inch-SSDPE2MW400G4R5/dp/B00VPK0LN0

 

As far as the hardware goes, some of us Linux users likes power also! There are Linux only PC shops that custom builds PC's for their customers, which is why there's an 'OEM' distro of Linux Mint. This allows the builder to provide the same new out of the box experience (OOBE) as one would get at a retailer with an Chromebook, MacBook or PC, or Windows computers of all types. It also provides the OEM a way to setup Linux Mint w/out installing proprietary drivers or software that may violate any copyright laws, and can also create a recovery partition with the image to make the computer the same way again for when needed. I'm not sure if Ubuntu provides OEM media within the normal download links, although my guess is that it's highly probable these are available, given that Ubuntu is sold on a lot of pre-built computers for resale (or custom builds). As with Linux Mint, these OEM's have to abide by trade laws. Many of us, including myself, checks through these notices shown, to obtain the needed software for DVD playback & other uses. 

 

Any further ideas are welcome from all members. :)   Not about the hardware alone, OS settings & the like. Maybe some of you know some things that I don't, and know for a fact from posts that some Linux users here are very capable users of the Linux Mint/Ubuntu OS's & more. Usually, what applies to Ubuntu, also does for Mint & others. While Ubuntu & Linux Mint (in that order) are the most popular Linux distros in the World, there are also many other distros (probably close to or over a thousand) based on the back of Ubuntu, that some of you may be running & can offer tips/suggestions. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 08 October 2016 - 01:31 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 cat1092

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 01:34 PM

512GiB Samsung 950 Pro Ordered! :guitar:

 

Should be here Friday! :bounce:

 

In the meantime, have been searching & you know what? Ubuntu/Linux Mint has been supporting NVMe since Kernel version 3.3 released in 2012 (think Ubuntu 12.04/Linux Mint 13 :))! :thumbup2:

 

Here's an article with the proof, while it covers Windows 7 in the first half, it goes on to cover Linux Mint Cinnamon further down the page, will surely bookmark it. 

 

https://delightlylinux.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/the-samsung-950-pro-256g-and-linux-does-it-work/

 

While the creation of partitions doesn't work with GParted, it does with Disks, shown in article & fdisk. GParted simply doesn't recognize the device. Since this is the 512GiB version, performance should be better than what's shown, the only thing that I ordered different was the PCIe x4 adapter. Should I encounter issues with the Addonics model (shouldn't), will order the Lycom DT-120 of the same. However, I read before purchase, and the model purchased works with these drives. Many are leaving negative reviews because they don't know what they're doing with the SSD and/or adapter. 

 

One noteworthy thing in the article, this SSD was installed on a Z87 motherboard, so should be even better on the Z97, 

 

There are also links just below 'Linux MInt Cinnamon' that shows Xubuntu 16.04 & Ubuntu 16.04 works fine with the drive, and a more recent link in regards to Linux Mint 18, which is expected, as the latter was a later distro release.

 

Update (April 21, 2016): Xubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 16.04 also recognize the Samaung 950 Pro and install just fine.

 

Update (July 16, 2016): Linux Mint 18 also recognizes, installs, and boots with the Samsung 950 Pro. 

 

And may not have to bother with a UEFI/GPT install at all, though will have to figure out how to create a 3rd partition on a HDD for my VM's (maybe one of the options in the drop down list of installer). Though am concerned (until I read otherwise) that I may be missing out on features or performance by not setting the system up as UEFI/GPT. Will have to keep on researching the issue, am also a member of the Samsung Hardware forum, because I own one of their shabby ultrabooks that were one of the few 'busts' produced by the corporation. Maybe they'll have some information to pass on to me in regards to the 950 Pro. :)

 

Any support by the membership here will be welcomed, good or bad. We can even 'chit-chat' a bit as long as it pertains to the build, so bring it on! :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 16 August 2016 - 01:39 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 cat1092

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 04:55 PM

More New components have came in today! :thumbup2:

 

First, the ASUS DVD-CD RW optical drive that's the same as the two I have, only there's no ASUS brand on front of drive (NO NAME). However, the carefully wrapped package shows it's indeed an ASUS. :)

 

P3XQffO.jpg

 

Second a pair of SilverStone PWM fan splitter cables, to add at least a couple of the Cooler Master 4 pack fans purchased, if not all. Proper Airflow is not optional in a loaded PC. :thumbup2:

 

EDFvWEf.jpg

 

Third, and most important of the day, arrived minutes ago, the ASUS Trusted Platform Module (TPM) to lock down drives at the Hardware level! :thumbsup:

 

xypqFUV.jpg

 

Awaiting one more item, a CPU cooler & the assembly will begin, with plenty of real time photos along the way! Not OEM snapshots as posted on Newegg or Amazon & other online sites. In fact, all of the photos uploaded were taken in my PC room, shared by me & my cats, as can be seen below, there should be a scratching post to the right. :)

 

Speaking of which, a final pic of the day, the stack of goodies keeps piling up! :bananas:

 

UC8J44S.jpg

 

It's coming Build Time soon, the SSD can be installed last! :guitar:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 12:41 AM

That's going to be an impressive machine Cat. You must be super exicited to get it all put together, and fired up. I would love to have that much RAM!



#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 01:00 AM

Should be here Friday! :bounce:

 
Great ... now I am going to be thinking all day Friday, until it is your Friday, what effect that jumping up and down will have on your back.

 
:thumbup2:
 
:wizardball: Wiz

Edited by NickAu, 18 August 2016 - 05:57 AM.
Removed inappropriate comment


#15 cat1092

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 02:55 AM

While conventional wisdom would say to purchase the GeForce GTX 1070 before the SSD, and while many may feel that I should had, I went with the heart on this purchase. :heart:

 

May live to regret it temporarily, as I could had purchased not only the card, also w/out spending another red cent, transferred the existing 512GiB Samsung 850 Pro w/10 year warranty in this PC to the new one. Yet the allure of the purchase of the 512GiB Samsung 950 Pro, an item I had been drooling over before the GeForce GTX 10 series made headlines & the main reason why I wanted a Z97 PC build, coupled by the fact that the available Z97 MB's were falling in numbers & low RAM pricing that could double any day, felt compelled to 'pull the trigger'. Pricing for the GeForce GTX 1070's, if anything, unless AMD goes belly up in a short time, will continue to fall, and the model of card I desire will still be plentiful, or maybe a better choice will come along, who knows? 

 

Not to worry about the 1070, the price keeps dropping, and hopefully will drop to the original suggested pricing ($399.99) by the time I get the rest, though I realize that the OC, SC & FTW editions will cost a bit more. Oh, the bouncing, that was just the only way that I could express myself over the deal (9% or over $31 saved), and the sheer speed of the 512GiB Samsung 950 Pro. The lesser 256GiB version, while would had been plenty enough, didn't meet the crave for speed that's been burning in my belly for the last two years, only 2x faster than the Samsung 850 Pro or EVO. The 950 Pro is nearly 4x faster with reads, and close to 3x faster with writes (average 3.5x faster). In summary, it's a consumer drive with enterprise grade components & quality. Some articles may imply there's no support, well I have the Microsoft NVMe driver for Windows 7 downloaded from the Windows Update servers for slipstreaming into install media for that OS, and a Samsung driver download bundle for Windows 8.1 & 10. 

 

While I've read reports & articles that the Samsung 950 Pro SSD is overkill for a home user, and w/out saying they're wrong, why does it now seem like the days of when going to a doctor's office or other place of business, we seldom hear 'the computers are slow' anymore? Because these machines has similar drives installed, may not be the same exact model, there are workstations where one person is doing the work of four from just 5-6 years back (I suppose the end of the XP days for many businesses). These workstations has to be running high powered, lightning fast SSD's (along with other hardware) to do the work that they do & stay caught up. I want that same type of dependability & speed in a Home PC, running a Pro OS. 

 

For many, this is a once in a lifetime chance to do what we want, and rather than blow the cash on something that won't be around, or only for a few days (such as a vacation), I chose to do something that I've wanted to do since 2010, build my own PC from new components. 6 years, I've waited for this day, and when the deal is done, hopefully it'll meet my needs for years to come. :)

 

In the meantime, will keep on stashing extra cash as I have been, come 3 generations of GPU's down the road (about 3-5 years), will be reaching much deeper than ever into the ultra performance cards, because the rest of the build will be there. In fact, there's a chance once my XPS 8700 goes out of warranty, will purchase a low cost Z97 MB for it, to tap into the full potential of the i7-4770, and add a similar (if not the same) SSD to it, by then, pricing will further drop, or a newer version will be released. BTW, Samsung still recommends a $399 price tag on the 512GiB 950 Pro. There is one ASRock MB that I was hesitant to purchase for the new build that I wouldn't (at $125) wouldn't blink an eye over purchasing as a replacement for the Dell supplied one, and was one of only four Z97 MB's that has a native x4 M.2 port built into the MB. Of course, cooling is more of an issue there, though there are copper heatsink chips that can help, still it's convenient when there's only 4 expansion slots at the rear of the PC. :thumbsup:

 

Now on with the build, Step #1 has been performed, the swap of the Dell supplied i7-4770 is now back into the XPS 8700, as shown in my Speccy link below, and rather than place the Dell cooler back in, used the one supplied with the i7-4790K, which has a center copper core. As a result, the i7-4770 runs cooler than it did when shipped to me under load, though has never returned to the 28-32C temps as when the PC was purchased. Maybe because it's now pushing more. this GTX 960 that'll be going into the new build for a short time, plus 20GB more RAM. 

 

I need an opinion, ordered another like it, because the locking tabs had to be snipped off & used the long screws that holds an optical drive in place for the install in the Dell. Should I use the Intel thermal paste that's pre-applied, or clean & use the Arctic MX-4 thermal paste that I've been using for years (& MX-2 prior to MX-4 availability). It's not a bad fan, nor is it as loud as many claims in reviews, or at least that's been the case in my Dell, it's an Intel cooler, produced by Foxconn (I presume that's the fan). Have seen many computers with Foxconn fans & has ran good for years. Same with OEM heatsinks, for the most part, while there are higher quality ones, many are of the universal type, designed for both AMD & Intel CPU's of many different types, with lots of adapters. While the spare parts may be seen as having good by some (such as system builders), I'd rather have a cooler that fits the exact socket & that one only, suppliers knows what sells & will have the correct ones. Makes it a lot easier to install, more precision fit, and takes a lot of guesswork out of the picture. And I'd not blink an eye over the $10 extra in cost for having exactly what I need & no more nor less. :)

 

Does anyone know if the Intel thermal solution is any good? Am posting a pic of the actual item purchased so that the community can see what I have, or the link to it. Click onto the pics to enlarge. :)

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Intel-Core-I7-LGA1150-4790K-Heatsink-With-Fan/262550878699?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D37577%26meid%3D29f4f0c594b44acebb04eb5be7ea3b66%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D282005943641

 

Here's another just like it, though it was $5 more, the one above arrived yesterday, just 3 days after ordering. Am posting this one also, some may find it to be a better view. Just mouse over the images & the three strips of thermal paste on the copper core can be seen. :thumbup2:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Intel-Core-i7-4790K-HeatSink-Cooling-Fan-JLE276-/282005943641?hash=item41a8dd3559:g:1boAAOSwYmZXEO~k

 

Anyone who knows about Intel pre-applied paste, please speak up, good and bad reviews. I don't think that Intel would had included the fan/heatsink if it were no good, because the CPU has a 3 year warranty, and I purchased early so that I wouldn't have to come up with $400 for it. It's the actual CPU's of the 3rd & 4th gen that concerns me the most, don't know if it was fixed in the 6th gen or not. Underneath the cap of the CPU, rather than fluxless solder, Intel cheaped out & used common thermal paste instead. Which will eventually dry out & no matter what, temps will skyrocket, and us owners will have no choice but to 'delid' the CPU & apply a small amount of liquid metal in the center, there's several YouTube videos that covers this. 

 

Fortunately, when the day comes, as long as my friend is still running a shop, he'll do this for me, in exchange for some work that I can do for him to help catch up. Such as RAM, SSD, CPU, GPU & PSU upgrades, as well as OS reinstalls & everything that includes. What I don't get into is Malware removal, since I keep my data off of the OS partition, will if on a single drive, copy all of the Data folders to an external & then reinstall using the Recovery partition. As for me, I simply no longer trust a Malware infested system, because these issues can get deep into the registry.

 

Most of these things are what keeps the doors of many PC shops open. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 August 2016 - 01:55 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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