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blast from the past


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#1 hifijohn

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 06:03 PM

bought a pack-mate (packard bell 386)at a garage sale for $5. 3.3m of ram and 40 m of harddrive,the processor runs at 16 megs!! the date codes on the chips say 1990. at first I thought the OS was win 3.0 but it has no audio inputs or outputs,but it does have a mouse port, so im guessing its win2.0???? it might be DOS but would a DOS computer have any use for mouse?? I cant boot it up it keeps giving me a configuration error so it never gets to the desktop. any ideas.



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 07:00 PM

Windows 3.1 or DOS is about it for this antique. See if changing your CMOS battery if not soldered to the MB fixes the configuration error or try setting your BIOS settings to default.

 

http://www.pcmuseum.ca/details.asp?id=261

 

If you see page 88 of infoworld a packard bell 20Mhz 386 with 1mb of RAM and a floppy drive without the hard drive had a retail price of $4999 in 1987 dollars which is equivalent to over $10000 in today's dollars. Oh yeah, the keyboard was included.


Edited by JohnC_21, 14 August 2016 - 07:11 PM.


#3 Platypus

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 07:30 PM

would a DOS computer have any use for mouse?


Yes, in a graphics mode application, and even the occasional text mode program could accept mouse input.

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#4 hifijohn

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 09:01 PM

Windows 3.1 or DOS is about it for this antique. See if changing your CMOS battery if not soldered to the MB fixes the configuration error or try setting your BIOS settings to default.

 

http://www.pcmuseum.ca/details.asp?id=261

 

If you see page 88 of infoworld a packard bell 20Mhz 386 with 1mb of RAM and a floppy drive without the hard drive had a retail price of $4999 in 1987 dollars which is equivalent to over $10000 in today's dollars. Oh yeah, the keyboard was included.

and now they are worth $5 at a garage sale



#5 Thomas_JK

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 02:09 PM


Windows 3.1 or DOS is about it for this antique. See if changing your CMOS battery if not soldered to the MB fixes the configuration error or try setting your BIOS settings to default.
 
http://www.pcmuseum.ca/details.asp?id=261
 
If you see page 88 of infoworld a packard bell 20Mhz 386 with 1mb of RAM and a floppy drive without the hard drive had a retail price of $4999 in 1987 dollars which is equivalent to over $10000 in today's dollars. Oh yeah, the keyboard was included.

and now they are worth $5 at a garage sale

...which is nice, because it makes vintage computers very affordable hobby. I have got comps for a price like that, and for free.

Have you made any progress with your Packard Bell? Empty CMOS battery is a likely cause for configuration error. Anyway it would be good to check and change the battery, and if its soldered to the motherboard, get it off (carefully)because if an old battery leaks on the Mobo, it can damage it.

Computers of that era often needed a special set up diskette to enter BIOS for setting the configuration. But making a hardware change might force it to enter BIOS at next boot up.
Some time ago I had difficulties getting in to BIOS of an Olivetti 386 comp. I didn't have the set up diskette. I took one RAM stick out, it entered the BIOS and I was able to enter HD size, floppy drive size, etc.




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