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CV (Résumé) Tipss for getting into IT


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#1 Ziltoid

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 11:17 AM

Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening (whichever is most applicable),

 

I'm looking to get into IT and hoping for some tips for my CV.

 

I recently did a day with the IT department at my company, but they cannot take me on as they had originally planned as a few members of the team have left, and they require experienced people to take up the slack now from being short for some time. As a result, they don't have anyone to train me, and an excellent opportunity to stay with the company and do what I want to do long-term has been left dead in the water so it seems.

 

I have done an OU course for an Introduction to Cyber Security, CompTIA IT Fundamentals, and I am studying towards my CompTIA A+. I have a good troubleshooting ability, good knowledge of MS Office software, and plenty of repair experience outside of the work environment (including using Remote Access Tools). Unfortunately I don't have the time or finances to take up any kind of degree or other education outside of what  I can basically buy the material to study for and go sit exams.

 

Unfortunately apart from what is here I don't have so much to add in terms of covering my experience. It's frustrating as I'm stuck in that loop of not having enough experience/not able to get it. I've been toying with computers, upgrading, fixing etc for family and friends for years, but this doesn't seem like something I can make much use of as a selling point.

 

I've had one face-to-face interview, and one telephone interview. The feedback from the face-to-face was that they felt I was too good for the role and might be inclined to leave if I get bored, and the Telephone interview resulted in feedback basically saying I was too ambitious to work for them as they basically wanted people to come in and stay in that role, with no real room to progress.

 

The IT role at my company seemed ideal, but the bad news came after I had basically been told I had the job for a couple of months - I trained replacements for me in my department, and then was told last second by the IT Infrastructure manager that I couldn't go over. The result is that I'm now incredibly frustrated and need to find some way to spice up my CV so it's more relevant to the role I want. Currently, I get phone calls on average once a week for non-IT roles, which leads me to believe my CV is good, but definitely not ticking the boxes I'm looking for.

 

So basically, I'm looking for any pointers - anything I can use or should use to my advantage, and any other general tips. For what it's worth - long term I'm very interested in IT security, although I've always stressed this is just something on paper - I don't feel I can know for sure until I have a decent level of experience in other IT roles, and right now I'll be happy to just get started.

 

Any advice you can offer would be greatly appreciated!


Edited by JSullivan1990, 13 August 2016 - 11:19 AM.


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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 05:06 PM

Take a look at my posting in this thread.  That's what the top of my resume looks like.

 

It sounds like the two interviews you had were for entry level positions and your experience is better than that.



#3 Ziltoid

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 03:11 AM

Take a look at my posting in this thread.  That's what the top of my resume looks like.

 

It sounds like the two interviews you had were for entry level positions and your experience is better than that.

 

Thanks, I'm taking a look at the CV layout you have used for some ideas.

You say my experience is better than that? How so? As far as I can tell, I need to be trying for entry level as I don't have that on-the-job IT experience. Am I approaching it wrong?



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 09:22 AM

Something you are doing in the interviews is giving the impression that you want to gain experience and move on and that is scaring them off.  They don't want to invest in training you only to have you leave.  Then again this is about you, not them.  A company is not going to look out for your best interests.

 

I look at employment as a mutually beneficial arrangement.  My employer pays me for doing something they do not have the skills to do.  I am free to leave at any time, for any reason.  While I am there I will do the best job I can.  I am constantly evaluating my position and if I am starting to dread going to work it is time to start looking for some place else.  Long gone are the days where you work at one employer for your entire career.  I have worked at over a decade in some positions and less than a year in others.

 

I'd examine how you answer the questions in the interview regarding your future, that seems to be what is scaring them off.  I agree that the IT role at your company would probably have been best, that's how I got started.  Unfortunately it didn't work out for you.  Getting your A+ and possibly Network+ would be a good start.  Then your company might be interested in moving you into IT, if not, you will have something to offer another company.



#5 Ziltoid

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 09:28 AM

Something you are doing in the interviews is giving the impression that you want to gain experience and move on and that is scaring them off.  They don't want to invest in training you only to have you leave.  Then again this is about you, not them.  A company is not going to look out for your best interests.

 

I look at employment as a mutually beneficial arrangement.  My employer pays me for doing something they do not have the skills to do.  I am free to leave at any time, for any reason.  While I am there I will do the best job I can.  I am constantly evaluating my position and if I am starting to dread going to work it is time to start looking for some place else.  Long gone are the days where you work at one employer for your entire career.  I have worked at over a decade in some positions and less than a year in others.

 

I'd examine how you answer the questions in the interview regarding your future, that seems to be what is scaring them off.  I agree that the IT role at your company would probably have been best, that's how I got started.  Unfortunately it didn't work out for you.  Getting your A+ and possibly Network+ would be a good start.  Then your company might be interested in moving you into IT, if not, you will have something to offer another company.

 

Thanks again.

 

I'll rehash my CV and see if it lands me anywhere. If it does I'll try and play it being less ambitious - once I have the experience building over time I can start looking at options - I suppose I just need to take what will get me the relevant work experience, after which I can start being a bit pickier about who I want to work for and whether they will be offering me the kind of scope I want in my employment.

 

Some food for thought - much appreciated.



#6 Kilroy

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 11:06 AM

IT covers a very large area with many different aspects.  Once you're in IT you can see where you want to go and then start learning what you need to know to do the job you want.  Never take a job where you won't learn anything.

 

I don't know how the IT market is in the UK, but in the US most of the IT work is contract work.  The good thing about contract work is that you get to work with a lot of different software and hardware.  You can frequently turn a contract position into a full time position.  I don't bother with short term contracts, I look for six months or better.



#7 Ziltoid

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 11:51 AM

IT covers a very large area with many different aspects.  Once you're in IT you can see where you want to go and then start learning what you need to know to do the job you want.  Never take a job where you won't learn anything.

 

I don't know how the IT market is in the UK, but in the US most of the IT work is contract work.  The good thing about contract work is that you get to work with a lot of different software and hardware.  You can frequently turn a contract position into a full time position.  I don't bother with short term contracts, I look for six months or better.

 

Most of what I'm seeing in the UK is full-time employment on a permanent basis. Having said that, I'm mostly looking at the bottom-end of the market here. I think higher up there may be a lot more contract work. 






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