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No win7 boot after system clone to new ssd


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#1 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 02:00 AM

I purchased a new 500 GB Samsung ssd to replace my old 120 GB Samsung. I use system images to quickly "refresh" my windows installation, so I just restored a system image on my new (MBR initialized) SSD. Problem: it gives a quick blue scree at startup and then instantly reboots. Startup repair from a bootable windows 7 install stick said that the installation was not fixable.

 

Any suggestions here? I don't like to do a clean install since I have a nice and clean system image with all stuff that I need.



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 05:32 AM

You refer to having done two different things:  cloning and creating a system image.  Backing up (system image) is not the same as cloning (duplication of partition/drive contents).

 

Please tell us just what you did and what software used to do it.

 

Louis



#3 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 05:38 AM

What steps did you take to restore the image to the new drive? Where is the backup image stored? Did you disconnect the old hard drive?



#4 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 05:41 AM

You refer to having done two different things:  cloning and creating a system image.  Backing up (system image) is not the same as cloning (duplication of partition/drive contents).

 

Please tell us just what you did and what software used to do it.

 

Louis

 

I used True Image to create an image of my old installation and restored that to the new 500gb ssd. The image is stored on a third, 4 TB hdd. I didn't directly clone from one partition to the other, but instead created an image file and restored only the partition (not the MBR) to the new ssd.



#5 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 05:44 AM

What steps did you take to restore the image to the new drive? Where is the backup image stored? Did you disconnect the old hard drive?

 

I disconnected the old hard drive. The backup image is stored on a third disk and was restored directly to the new drive via a bootable usb. In the boot menu of my bios, I manually choose the new hard drive each time the system boots because boot order is not proper yet, but this shouldn't matter. I have done this many times before and never had issues.

 

Just to be sure: is the content of boot.ini dependent on which SATA port is used to connect the drive to the motherboard? If I would take a working system and just plug in the SATA cable in a different port, will it still boot if you choose the correct disk in the bios to boot from?



#6 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 06:34 AM

With true image you can backup the system reserved partition it's critical to include this small 100mb partition in your backups. It has bcd boot loader information stored there. With that intact you should not have any issues cloning the image to a new drive. The system reserved is the only partition on the drive that should be set as active. If that isn't included in the backup then that has made things more complicated. Yes, changing drives around to different sata ports can cause boot problems. Changing bios settings around can cause it to not boot like IDE to AHCI or vice versa. What does it do when it boots does it get a Windows splash screen at all?



#7 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 06:54 AM

With true image you can backup the system reserved partition it's critical to include this small 100mb partition in your backups. It has bcd boot loader information stored there. With that intact you should not have any issues cloning the image to a new drive. The system reserved is the only partition on the drive that should be set as active. If that isn't included in the backup then that has made things more complicated. Yes, changing drives around to different sata ports can cause boot problems. Changing bios settings around can cause it to not boot like IDE to AHCI or vice versa. What does it do when it boots does it get a Windows splash screen at all?

 

I don't like to have so many partitions. When I installed windows in the past, I initialized the disk using GParted and a linux boot stick to completely fill my drive with one primary partiiton. I then formatted this partition during windows install and managed to install windows and all system files on one partition and skip the 100mb system partition: it's MBR, not GPT.

 

Yes, I do get the splash screen for a second or so. Then the system reboots without error messages (or mayb a quick flash of a BSOD that is there for 10 miliseconds)



#8 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:12 AM

Do you have a system repair disk? You need to run that get to the command prompt and verify that the c drive is active. Using command diskpart. Are you familiar with diskpart?



#9 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:15 AM

Be sure the old drive is removed if you're trying to boot into the new drive.



#10 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:31 AM

Do you have a system repair disk? You need to run that get to the command prompt and verify that the c drive is active. Using command diskpart. Are you familiar with diskpart?

 

I am familiar with diskpart. I removed the old drive and used some tools in a WinPE environment to attempt fixing it. Strangely, my new drive was assigned G: and not C: in a WinPE, even with the old drive removed. I don't know how to change that.



#11 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:36 AM

That's ok as long as you can do a dir command and verify the Windows directory and files are there. WinPE does that it changes the drive lettering. You want to do commands for disk part and check that it's active...

 

---check if it's active---

 

diskpart

list disk

select disk 0

detail disk

 

-----make it active----

 

select partition 1

active

exit



#12 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:37 AM

That's ok as long as you can do a dir command and verify the Windows directory and files are there. WinPE does that it changes the drive lettering. You want to do commands for disk part and check that it's active...

 

---check if it's active---

 

diskpart

list disk

select disk 0

detail disk

 

-----make it active----

 

select partition 1

active

exit

 

but it's disk 6 or so (I think)...



#13 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:38 AM

make it bootable...

 

BCDBOOT G:\windows /s G:


 

That's ok as long as you can do a dir command and verify the Windows directory and files are there. WinPE does that it changes the drive lettering. You want to do commands for disk part and check that it's active...

 

---check if it's active---

 

diskpart

list disk

select disk 0

detail disk

 

-----make it active----

 

select partition 1

active

exit

 

but it's disk 6 or so (I think)...

 

ok then you have more hard drives in the system then just one then?



#14 technonymous

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:39 AM

do you see a disk in there after running command list disk that says boot?

 

 

Edit: I meant after select disk 0 and then command list volume.


Edited by technonymous, 12 August 2016 - 08:43 AM.


#15 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:43 AM

make it bootable...

 

BCDBOOT G:\windows /s G:


 

That's ok as long as you can do a dir command and verify the Windows directory and files are there. WinPE does that it changes the drive lettering. You want to do commands for disk part and check that it's active...

 

---check if it's active---

 

diskpart

list disk

select disk 0

detail disk

 

-----make it active----

 

select partition 1

active

exit

 

but it's disk 6 or so (I think)...

 

ok then you have more hard drives in the system then just one then?

 

Yes, an additional 8 or so.






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