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How do I get a FX-6300 CPU to run at 4.1GHz Turbo on Linux Mint 18?


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 03:27 AM

Topic header shows fairly much what I want to accomplish. :)

 

There's a difference in how Turbo works in Intel & AMD CPU's, while the cpufreq app (get it by 'sudo apt-get install cpufreq' & log out & back on) works fine on both Intel & AMD CPU's, there's one difference. With Intel i core series CPU's that's Turbo capable, there's a Turbo option shown at the top, with AMD CPU's (don't know about APU's), there's no such option. :(

 

Anyone know of a command that unlocks the AMD Turbo feature at the OS level? :)

 

Here's my present output of inxi -Fx

 

cat@cat-ASRockPro3 ~ $  inxi -Fx

System:    Host: cat-ASRockPro3 Kernel: 4.4.0-28-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 5.3.1)
           Desktop: MATE 1.14.1 (Gtk 3.18.9-1ubuntu3.1)
           Distro: Linux Mint 18 Sarah
Machine:   Mobo: ASRock model: 970M Pro3
           Bios: American Megatrends v: P1.50 date: 01/11/2016
CPU:       Hexa core AMD FX-6300 Six-Core (-MCP-) cache: 12288 KB
           flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm) bmips: 41909
           clock speeds: max: 3500 MHz 1: 3500 MHz 2: 3500 MHz 3: 3500 MHz
           4: 3500 MHz 5: 3500 MHz 6: 3500 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Cape Verde XT [Radeon HD 7770/8760 / R7 250X]
           bus-ID: 01:00.0
           Display Server: X.Org 1.18.3 driver: radeon
           Resolution: 1920x1080@60.00hz
           GLX Renderer: Gallium 0.4 on AMD CAPE VERDE (DRM 2.43.0, LLVM 3.8.0)
           GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 11.2.0 Direct Rendering: Yes
Audio:     Card-1 Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:14.2
           Card-2 Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Cape Verde/Pitcairn HDMI Audio [Radeon HD 7700/7800 Series]
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-28-generic
Network:   Card: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller
           driver: r8169 v: 2.3LK-NAPI port: d000 bus-ID: 05:00.0
           IF: enp5s0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full
           mac: d0:50:99:99:30:a4
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 1748.4GB (2.7% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: M4 size: 128.0GB
           ID-2: /dev/sdb model: Samsung_SSD_850 size: 120.0GB
           ID-3: /dev/sdc model: WDC_WD10EARS size: 1000.2GB
           ID-4: /dev/sdd model: WDC_WD5003ABYX size: 500.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 40G used: 8.3G (23%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-2: /home size: 99G used: 34G (37%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdd1
           ID-3: swap-1 size: 1.07GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sdd2
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 29.5C mobo: N/A gpu: 42.0
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 253 Uptime: 2:05 Memory: 3422.6/11988.5MB
           Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 5.4.0
           Client: Shell (bash 4.3.421) inxi: 2.2.35 
 
As can be seen, am running in Performance Mode, all six cores hammering at 3500MHz or 3.5GHz, it's getting to the 4.1GHz that's elusive, and would be a decent performance boost, about that of many of the Intel 3rd & 4th gen series CPU's that runs at 3.4 to 3.5Ghz native & with Turbo, will hit about 3.9GHz, as well as many of the unlocked (K series) w/out overclocking. Only Devil's Canyon of the 4th gen series will run at 4.5GHz or over with manual overclock, out of the box, it's 4.0GHz with 4.4GHz Turbo (i7-4790K), cream of the crop for the series & where one of my other Mint installs runs on. Having had only one modern AMD CPU in years, am no longer familiar with how to bring the beast out of these. :P
 
Would be sweet to pull the same off with Linux Mint 18, or Ubuntu 16.04 users with the chip, though any tips should also work on Linux Mint 13/Ubuntu 12.04 & above, work with much of the 'FX' line & will benefit many other than myself. At the current time, Linux Mint 17.3 & Ubuntu 14.04 are still popular, in large part due to the AMD GPU situation, though my MSI Radeon HD 7770 OC edition is running on the OS fine, just no manual controls, maybe I'm one of the lucky ones, was running fine before the patch was issued for these cards & didn't gain any visual difference. The OS was installed as a Preview before links were placed here & before any GPU solution was posted. 
 
Any advice on getting the AMD FX-6300 series to run in Turbo mode would be greatly appreciated, and hopefully the Topic won't be moved elsewhere where fellow Linux users won't see the fix. Many of us Linux users desires our performance just as much as those running other OS's! :thumbsup:
 
I'll take a Terminal command to use at every boot if it's all I can get! :)
 
Cat

 

 


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 07:31 AM

You could try this.

https://community.linuxmint.com/software/view/indicator-cpufreq

 

I have it on Ubuntu and its set to on demand.


Edited by NickAu, 09 August 2016 - 07:34 AM.

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#3 cat1092

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 05:16 AM

Yes, that's the one that I have, only mine's often set at performance so that it's ready for when a VM is fired up. :)

 

Have used that neat indicator for years, since at least 2010-11, when I first heard of it. Today, it doubles as a battery saver, when I first started using cpufreq-indicator, more wanted performance. Nowadays more wants max battery life & a cool running computer (mainly notebook users), guess the times has changed. 

 

Yet there will always be many of us whom wants the most from our hardware, especially desktop (typically mid or full tower) computers. cpufreq-indicator is an excellent tool for this, though Intel users gets the most benefit. 

 

I guess it's looking like I'll have to resort to the options in the UEFI to have a stable 4.0GHz chip (leaving 0.1GHz for safety). Am a novice with AMD CPU's built in this decade, while I've installed a few, haven't bothered with much any settings, though will benchmark the CPU to see how it performs & help to further spread the thermal paste by running hard. 

 

My other experience with AMD chips has been limited to dual cores w/out Turbo, and more recently, a quad core Athlon II x4 630 (2.8GHz) & true quad, no HT or virtual cores. Had that been the 3.0GHz chip, may had stuck with it & had I had more forethought, would had went with a MB beginning in the 'FM' series. I was looking for SATA-3 & USB 3.0, didn't dawn on me that I should had went with an APU. On the other hand, those whom purchases the enthusiast editions of the Intel i7 series (six & eight cores), there's no onboard graphics, leaving the CPU for what it was intended to be, processing performance. To this day, I feel that should be an OEM (if branded computer) feature of the motherboard, same for those whom builds their own, just as there's onboard audio to this day. Both AMD & Intel have 'dumbed down' their CPU's (or APU's) by the inclusion of graphics, the resources devoted to this can be used to produce a more powerful CPU. 

 

Looks like it's time to read into the ASRock 970M Pro3 manual deep, to figure out how to slowly bump up the frequency, maybe 0.1GHz per shot until goal is met, would only require 5 bumps upwards. That will also be the safe way to upgrade. If I'm not mistaken, there's a smart feature of the OC panel to help prevent damage. 

 

If I have to upgrade the cooler, no big deal for $25-30. I'd rather run at 4.0GHz & maintain current temps (or lower) than bump up & it gets hotter. Should it idle at 35C or higher, will make the small investment, will add years of life to the CPU & possibly MB, which has to absorb some of the excessive heat. As it stands, it'll sometimes idle in the upper teens, so 35C would nearly double that value. While some may see that temp as 'safe', not me, want it as close to the OOTB temps as possible, can accept maybe a total 5C increase (after cooler install & GHz goal achieved). 

 

Will post back results as these comes in, though won't go to 4.0GHz w/out a 3rd party CPU cooler, the stock one is loud when under load. Maybe a safe 3.7Ghz or so until then, need the experience of a non-stock cooler install, for my soon upcoming Devil's Canyon build from scratch. :)

 

Cat


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 02:51 AM

You could try this.

https://community.linuxmint.com/software/view/indicator-cpufreq

 

I have it on Ubuntu and its set to on demand.

 

This is a safe option for many, regardless of whether we want max performance or max battery life/better cooling. 

 

However for those with Intel CPU's, at least beginning with the 3rd gen ones, one must make a few simple changes that's easy, provided you're comfortable with working with the Terminal. I didn't have to do this until Linux Mint 17.2 or .3, forget which. 

 

http://www.webupd8.org/2014/04/prevent-your-laptop-from-overheating.html

 

Now, after amending that line (as seen below), slowly arrow key down to just above the bottom text, where there's options & then press Ctrl + x, then Y to confirm & Enter. Not doing so is a huge mistake. 

 

 

 

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash intel_pstate=enable"

 

Before it showed that, it ended with "quiet splash". All one is doing is moving the major key (") out of the way, then copy/paste intel_pstate=enable"

 

Now after making this change, including Ctrl + x & then Y & enter, that's when to make sure that Grub is updated, as shown in the article. 

 

 

 

sudo update-grub

 

Then 'sudo reboot' w/out the quotes. 

 

As long as cpufreq is installed, one can now change frequencies. If not installed, here's how to do it, there's likely links in Nick's post as well. 

 

 

 

sudo apt-get install indicator-cpufreq

 

Run that, then either log out or reboot (I prefer reboot) & now you have choices. :)

 

Yet that leaves two questions unanswered on Linux. How to push the turbo to the max available frequency on Linux, example 4.4GHz on an Intel i7-4790K, or 4.1GHz on an AMD FX-6300. With both, only the max stock speeds are shown, as listed here, have tried all of the Turbo settings to no avail. No difference from choosing 'Performance' mode. 

 

 

cat@cat-ASUSZ97PROGamer ~ $ inxi -Fxz

System:    Host: cat-ASUSZ97PROGamer Kernel: 4.4.0-38-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 5.4.0)
           Desktop: MATE 1.14.1 (Gtk 3.18.9-1ubuntu3.1)
           Distro: Linux Mint 18 Sarah
Machine:   System: ASUS product: All Series
           Mobo: ASUSTeK model: Z97-PRO GAMER v: Rev X.0x
           Bios: American Megatrends v: 2203 date: 02/26/2016
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i7-4790K (-HT-MCP-) cache: 8192 KB
           flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 31983
           clock speeds: max: 4001 MHz 1: 4001 MHz 2: 4001 MHz 3: 4001 MHz
           4: 4001 MHz 5: 4001 MHz 6: 4001 MHz 7: 4001 MHz 8: 4001 MHz
Graphics:  Card: NVIDIA Device 1b81 bus-ID: 01:00.0
           Display Server: X.Org 1.18.3 drivers: nvidia (unloaded: fbdev,vesa,nouveau)
           Resolution: 1920x1080@60.00hz
           GLX Renderer: GeForce GTX 1070/PCIe/SSE2
           GLX Version: 4.5.0 NVIDIA 370.28 Direct Rendering: Yes
Audio:     Card-1 NVIDIA Device 10f0 driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1
           Card-2 Intel 9 Series Family HD Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-38-generic
Network:   Card: Intel Ethernet Connection (2) I218-V
           driver: e1000e v: 3.2.6-k port: f040 bus-ID: 00:19.0
           IF: eno1 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 1000.2GB (1.1% used)
           ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 model: N/A size: 512.1GB
           ID-2: /dev/sda model: ST1000DM003 size: 1000.2GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 40G used: 9.1G (25%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/nvme0n1p6
           ID-2: /home size: 296G used: 777M (1%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda2
           ID-3: swap-1 size: 0.27GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/nvme0n1p5
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 29.8C mobo: 27.8C gpu: 0.0:41C
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: 0
Info:      Processes: 252 Uptime: 1:42 Memory: 2724.4/32117.0MB
           Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 5.4.0
           Client: Shell (bash 4.3.421) inxi: 2.2.35 
cat@cat-ASUSZ97PROGamer ~ $ 
 

 

So where's the 4.4GHz at? The same would apply to my FX-6300, in Turbo or Performance mode, still shows 3501 MHz. Going to 4.1Ghz with the AMD is not overclocking, it's within the CPU specs, just as 4.4GHz is with the i7-4790K. Note that I've not had success on Windows either with the AMD FX-6300, though have reached 4.3GHz with the Intel i7-4790K, using their benchmark tool. AMD doesn't provide this, and while I tried with the Intel one, it was a no go, it detects for an Intel CPU before benching. 

 

It would seem that some rules (maybe extra lines) would have to be added to the CPU scale to move things up, where at, I don't know at this time. :)

 

While we may have to go through the UEFI firmware settings (or classic BIOS), this is misleading advertising on AMD's end to advertise a feature similar to Intel's Turbo Boost, no one should have to adjust settings within there to get to the 4.1GHz max, while those with retail PC's doesn't have this option at all. It's not like the largest segment of the market has choices of BIOS or UEFI firmware to pick from & reflash to their liking, and if purchasing a new MB to accommodate the CPU, the OEM's wiring of the power switch will be a major obstacle to overcome. 

 

In other words, we're speaking of a new PC build to activate a feature that was advertised from the go. So for this reason, I cannot recommend AMD CPU upgrades unless truly necessary, and avoid Newegg like scalding water to bathe in, they have a long history of misrepresenting products. Plus one never knows that what's received is new or open box & returned. With CPU's, it's not like HDD/SSD's, there's no way to measure how long it's been in use, with a good cleanup, can be made just like new. 

 

Yet it would be great of them (& other retailers) to include documentation of how to get up to 4.1GHz, rather than promote it's like Turbo Boost. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113286

 

Note how Newegg keeps the 4.4Ghz in small print with the i7-4790K. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117369&cm_re=i7-4790K-_-19-117-369-_-Product

 

Misleading advertising that costs consumers untold amounts of cash every year. :angry:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 01 October 2016 - 02:53 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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