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No listing under MSConfig Boot tab / not sure what to do


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#1 mcomp72

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 09:04 PM

Yesterday I upgraded my SSD from a 500 GB drive to a 1 TB drive. I cloned the drive with Acronis True Image 2016. It seemed to work, but then it wouldn't boot up. I followed some instructions I found on another forum about how to repair the bcd (by booting up using the Windows 10 USB stick and going into the command prompt and running several commands), and that worked. The computer now boots up. However, I have now noticed that there is no listing under the MSConfig boot tab. Also, I don't know if System Restore is working - under C:, it says Missing.  I am not sure what to do now. I need to boot into Safe Mode, but I can't select Safe Mode in MSConfig because there is nothing listed under the Boot tab. It seems likely that whatever I did at the command prompt has messed things up. Anyone have any idea how I would fix this?

 

Here are 4 different screen shots I took to show you what some of the issues are:

 

This shows what I have under the MSConfig Boot tab:

ice_screenshot_20160807_141343.png

 

This shows what it says for System Restore:

ice_screenshot_20160807_141759.png

 

This shows the drives under Computer Management.  I noticed that none of them are marked as Active.  Whenever I right-click on any partition, the option to set it to active is greyed out.

ice_screenshot_20160807_144317.png

 

This is the boot options in my BIOS.  Yesterday I only had 4 Windows Boot Manager listings, and now I have 5.  I think it is because of what I did last night from the Command Prompt.  I know I am supposed to only have one listing for Windows Boot Manager, so obviously something is very wrong.

IMG_3820.jpg

 

I am at a loss as to what to do now.  I am out of my depth when it comes to this kind of problem.  Would anyone be able to give me step-by-step instructions as to how to fix everything?  I really don't want to have to do a fresh install of Windows 10.  I did this just a few months ago, and it's a huge pain to have to reinstall all the software.



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 11:36 PM

Hello mcomp72,

 

I am guessing that when you made the backup clone of the drive that not all the system reserved partitions was included. Lets look at your bcd...Go to search and type cmd and run as admin. type bcdedit > c:\bcd.txt Copy that into your next post.



#3 mcomp72

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 01:30 AM

Here is what was inside the TXT file:

 

The boot configuration data store could not be opened.
The requested system device cannot be found.
 
 
Also... I'm not sure if this is relevant, but in case it is:
- My BIOS is UEFI
- My new SSD is formatted using GPT
- I don't know if my old SSD was formatted using GPT or MBR

Edited by mcomp72, 08 August 2016 - 05:00 AM.


#4 technonymous

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:26 AM

For Windows 10 typically you will have a..

 

System Reserved 100MB (System,Active,Primary  Partition)

Windows 10 partition C: (boot,page file,crash dump, primary partition)

450MB (recovery partition)

 

For a UEFI/GPT SSD drive you will have another partition between system reserved and C: called the MSR Microsoft Reserved.

 

By the sound of it you made a clone of a drive, but didn't include the other partitions. Then you cloned that to your new drive. The system doesn't know how to boot the system as the UEFI boot record is all messed up and the partitions are all messed up. You will have to reinstall windows 10 fresh so that those partitions are properly built.



#5 mcomp72

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:51 AM

Yikes, that is quite a bummer.  Is there really no other way to repair the damage other than a fresh install?

 

What if I did the following:

 

1. create a backup of my current SSD (the new one) using Acronis True Image 2016 or the app included in Windows 10.  Only include the Windows 10 partition, not the System Reserved partition.  (Acronis will allow me to do this; I don't know about Windows since I have not used it before.)

 

2. format the SSD, and install a fresh copy of Windows 10.

 

3. restore the backup I made in step 1.

 

In theory, it sounds like it might create properly built partitions, and then give me back my existing drive.  Do you think it would work out like that?



#6 technonymous

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:01 PM

I have Acronis as well and I've always included all the partitions because this very reason that you're having issues with. It might be possible to do that if you make a backup telling Acronis not to include partition table information and just make a backup of windows itself. Then install windows fresh and then restore windows again over the fresh installed one. That way you don't lose your data. In theory it sounds good, but I haven't tried it.



#7 technonymous

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 09:06 PM

You may have to rebuild the bcd again. Except this time around you will actually have the proper partitions. Before the fresh install be certain that your bios is set to AHCI and not IDE. Format as GPT etc.



#8 usasma

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 07:07 AM

I use Acronis 2016 and find it very easy to not include all of the partitions (I recently cloned my W10 install to an SSD and remember having to select the entire HDD - as it wasn't selected by default).

3 options here:

- put the old HDD back in and then re-clone (ensuring that you select ALL partitions this time).

- attempt to rebuild the disk partitions and then copy over the cloned partitions (I can't help with this as I don't know enough about the partitions and/or BCD)

- do a fresh install of Windows, then extract your data files from the clone that you made and copy them to the new user profile.


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#9 mcomp72

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 09:39 AM

I tried my idea of backing up just the Windows partition, reinstalling Windows 10, and restoring the Windows partition.  It seemed to fix some problems, but not all.  I now have an entry in the MSConfig Boot tab.  Also, it appears my "Disk 0" now has the correct partitions -- but you tell me, since this is a bit above my head.

 

However, there are still multiple listing of Windows Boot Manager in my BIOS.  Someone mentioned running EasyBCD, so I did, but I did not attempt to make any changes with it yet.  I'm a bit nervous because I don't really understand what exactly I need to do.  Any ideas about how to solve the multiple Windows Boot Manager entries?   I assume I'm only supposed to have one?

 

Here is a link to some screen shots so you can see everything I talked about above.

http://postimg.org/gallery/338963pz0/


Edited by mcomp72, 09 August 2016 - 09:40 AM.


#10 mcomp72

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:33 AM

You may have to rebuild the bcd again. Except this time around you will actually have the proper partitions. Before the fresh install be certain that your bios is set to AHCI and not IDE. Format as GPT etc.

Before I did the fresh install of Windows 10, I forgot to look at my BIOS.  I did just now, and it is set to IDE and not AHCI.  If I change it, will I need to do the fresh install again?  Or is it possible to change it now and everything still be okay?

 

I don't know if it matters, but I have two internal drives inside my computer -- the C drive, which is an SSD, and the D drive, which is a HDD.  Will Windows still be able to access the D drive if I switch away from IDE?


Edited by mcomp72, 09 August 2016 - 04:23 PM.


#11 technonymous

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 09:43 PM

I tried my idea of backing up just the Windows partition, reinstalling Windows 10, and restoring the Windows partition.  It seemed to fix some problems, but not all.  I now have an entry in the MSConfig Boot tab.  Also, it appears my "Disk 0" now has the correct partitions -- but you tell me, since this is a bit above my head.

 

However, there are still multiple listing of Windows Boot Manager in my BIOS.  Someone mentioned running EasyBCD, so I did, but I did not attempt to make any changes with it yet.  I'm a bit nervous because I don't really understand what exactly I need to do.  Any ideas about how to solve the multiple Windows Boot Manager entries?   I assume I'm only supposed to have one?

 

Here is a link to some screen shots so you can see everything I talked about above.

http://postimg.org/gallery/338963pz0/

 

ok to took a look at your bcd under boot manager and you get multiple listings because that's what the bcd is showing. We can try to clean that up, but before you do anything with the bcd you need to back it up. To do that you start cmd as administrator type: bcdedit /export c:\bcd_backup If something goes wrong you can recover it by using the command: bcdedit /import c:\bcd_backup You can use the easybcd to edit it. Here is a example of how it should look you're are welcome to try it, but I cannot guarantee that it will work. I am only working with the information you provided. You're welcome to try this...

 

Windows Boot Manager
-----------------------------------------
identifier                      {bootmgr}
device                         partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
path                            \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description                  Windows Boot Manager
locale                          en-US
inherit                         {globalsettings}
default                        {current}
resumeobject             {9ed33c13-5e39-11e6-a279-d7ea83be7681}
displayorder               {current}
toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}
timeout                       5

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------------------------
identifier                               {current}
device                                  partition=C:
path                                     \WINDOWS\system32\winload.exe
description                           Windows 10
locale                                   en-US
inherit                                  {bootloadersettings}
isolatedcontext                    Yes
allowedinmemorysettings    0x15000075
osdevice                             partition=C:
systemroot                          /WINDOWS
resumeobject                     {9ed33c13-5e39-11e6-a279-d7ea83be7681}
nx                                       OptIn
bootmenupolicy                  Standard



#12 technonymous

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 09:53 PM

 

You may have to rebuild the bcd again. Except this time around you will actually have the proper partitions. Before the fresh install be certain that your bios is set to AHCI and not IDE. Format as GPT etc.

Before I did the fresh install of Windows 10, I forgot to look at my BIOS.  I did just now, and it is set to IDE and not AHCI.  If I change it, will I need to do the fresh install again?  Or is it possible to change it now and everything still be okay?

 

I don't know if it matters, but I have two internal drives inside my computer -- the C drive, which is an SSD, and the D drive, which is a HDD.  Will Windows still be able to access the D drive if I switch away from IDE?

 

You shouldn't have any issues with the way it is now. However, you may have got better performance using the ssd in AHCI mode. Yes your drives will function under AHCI mode as both drivers are installed. There is a messed up flaw in windows that if you don't set those setting prior then windows doesn't load them. If you go back and change them windows will not boot. However, there is a way to change it without reinstall. You go to msconfig and choose to boot into safeboot and select yes to restart. Before safeboot starts you press the delete key to go into the bios and change the drives to both AHCI. Then save the bios settings and continue to boot into safeboot. Once in safeboot you simply go back to msconfig and uncheck safeboot and restart the system normal mode.


Edited by technonymous, 09 August 2016 - 10:02 PM.


#13 mcomp72

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 12:04 AM

Wow – I have just had one of the strangest computer troubleshooting experiences I have ever had.

 

I attempted to repair the BCD with EasyBCD.  Afterward, I rebooted.  The computer would not boot up – in fact, it wouldn’t even get past the initial motherboard screen.  If I pressed DEL, it would not even boot into the UEFI BIOS.  I was sure I had screwed it up beyond all repair.

 

I looked on a forum, and someone recommended unplugging all drives, both internal and external, and trying to boot up.  I did that, and this time I was able to get into the BIOS.  I then plugged in one drive at a time, shutting down the computer between each one.  Every time it booted up fine.

 

What’s even more strange: all of the additional Windows Boot Manager listings were no longer showing up in my BIOS.  I have no idea if it was what I did in EasyBCD, or just the act of turning off the power to the computer somehow cleared out the BIOS.

 

In any event, it appears ALL of the issues I was having when I started this thread are now resolved.  Thanks to technonymous and usasma for all the help!


Edited by mcomp72, 10 August 2016 - 12:13 AM.


#14 technonymous

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 12:28 AM

Well I was going to suggest that, but didn't want to leave you with a non booting system. Looking at your previous posts of the boot screen it's hard to tell exactly what I am looking at. I was suggesting changing the BCD to reflect the way you have the hardware setup physically. Now that you changed the C drive with the proper reserved partitions etc your moving the drives around changed it back to the way it was supposed to be..lol Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't it's all really trial and error. Glad you got it working! Make a backup with True image now including all the partitions on the drive. The next time around the clone to new drive will be WAY much less painful as long as the new drive is the same or larger size than the C drive that fails. It really is important to keep that reserve partition information intact. Good luck!



#15 mcomp72

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 12:41 AM

Oh yes... thanks for the reminder about creating a new backup with True Image w/all partitions.  Will do that right now.  And thanks again for all the help!






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