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Windows 10 reports HD failure on known good hard drive?


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#1 PRocque225

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 12:54 PM

Hi All, interesting situation I've never encountered before... upgraded an older HP G71-340US from Windows 7 to Windows 10. Shortly afterwards, Windows 10 began reporting an imminent hard disk failure, and at start up it reported "SMART hard disk check has detected an imminent failure. Hard Disk 1 (301)." Before the upgrade there were no issues at all with the hard disk.

 

I removed the hard drive and attached it to main computer (also running Win10) using a USB-SATA adapter, where it showed up connected to the computer as drive letter F. I ran Check Disk both through the GUI and an admin command prompt ( chkdsk F:/f ) and Check Ddisk reported back that no errors were found on the drive. I ran Seatools and it also reported no issues. Once I returned it to the HP, at start up it again reported "SMART detected imminent failure... Hard Disk 1 (301)" and at the desktop the Windows imminent hard drive failure prompts resumed.

 

I'm about to run a "sfc /scannow" admin command from the HP to see if maybe that addresses the issue. I'd rather not permanently disable the error messages as a fix, if possible. Any ideas what could be causing this and how to fix it?



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#2 CKing123

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 01:22 PM

SMART failure basically means that your drive is beginning to fail. However, many of the attributes are vendor-specific which means there is no fixed standard on SMART data values being reported. But, just to be on the safe side, I would BACKUP all the data. After you have done that, lets see the exact SMART values using GSmartControl:
 
S8ANNnz.pngGSmartControl
Follow the instructions below to test your hard drive health with GSmartControl:

  • Download GSmartControl and save it on your Desktop;
  • Extract the content of the GSmartControl .zip archive and execute gsmartcontrol.exe;
  • Identify your drive in the list, and double-click on it to bring up it's window (usually you'll find your drive by it's size or it's brand name);
  • Go in the Perform Tests tab, then select Extended Self-test in the Test type drop-down list and click on Execute (this test can take a few hours to complete);
  • Once the test is over, the results will be displayed at the bottom of the window. Please copy and paste these results in your next reply;
  • Also, go in the Attributes tab and if you have any entries highlighted in red or pink, copy and paste their name in your next reply (or take a screenshot of the GSmartControl window and attach it in your next reply);

info_failing.png

-CKing


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#3 PRocque225

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 02:14 PM

Thanks for your help!

 

After running Gsmartcontrol, I believe that the hard drive is in fact failing. Luckily I have no important data on that drive and can just replace it, then do a clean install on Windows 10 on the new drive.

 

For the record, the results are attached. Quick summary:

-The extended self-test took under a minute and failed at less than 10% with an error message of "Completed with Unknown Failure."

-In the Attributes Tab, under the type column all results were either listed as "pre-failure" or "old age."

-The red entry was for Reallocated Sector Count; failed: now, type: pre-failure.

-Pink entries were for Reallocation Event Count: type: old age; Current Pending Sector Count type: old age.

-The Error Log tab reported an ATA Error Count of 26144

 

Looks like the drive wasn't in great shape, and the intense OS update to Windows 10 was the final straw that broke it!



#4 CKing123

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 02:39 PM

The thing is, many of the thresholds are vendor-specific and that SeaTools did not find any corrupt sectors means that it could be a false positive, but a rule of thumb is that if GSmart reports multiple errors, and the HD is being used for a few years, it is most likely corrupt.

 

-CKing


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#5 usasma

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 04:52 AM

I agree w/CKing123.

 

Just my 2¢:

 

CHKDSK is a check of the file system on the hard drive, not of the hard drive itself.

It's possible to pass CHKDSK and still have a failing HDD.

 

SMART is a predictive technology - not a diagnostic.

The threshold values are indicative of a failure - but do not specifically state that there is/will be a failure.

 

Also, it depends on which Seatools tests that you ran.

The quick/short test isn't very accurate.  While the long/extended is more accurate - no hard drive diagnostic is 100% accurate either.

 

The only certain test is to replace the hard drive (or leave it out of the mix for now).
If you replace it and the error still appears, then it bears looking into further.


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#6 PRocque225

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Posted 08 August 2016 - 10:47 AM

Just an update for everyone reading this topic, for future reference...

 

I went ahead and replaced the hard drive this past weekend, updated system to Windows 10 with a clean install, and no errors have occurred on that notebook since replacing the hard drive.

 

I put the old hard drive back on the USB-SATA caddy, connected it, and ran a few more tests. Interestingly the hard drive kept reporting it's capacity at lower and lower amounts; it was a 320GB drive, but showed up as 240GB, then 180GB, 90GB, then finally settled at 32GB. It also showed a partition of unknown size with a label that was a string of nonsense characters. So again, I'm now convinced that the old hard drive was in fact failing.






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