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Hardware Comparison


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#1 jkesselr

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 02:21 PM

Mod Edit:  Merged dupe topics - Hamluis.

 

Hey Guys:

 

I am buying a new laptop and the folks at Dell spec'd out a Latitude E7470 that contains an i7-6600U processor, 16 GB RAM (max they can install), 256GB Class 20 SSD, and a host of other things. I started playing with the Precision 5000 line and it seems like it might be the better way to go. The processor is an i7-6820HQ, RAM is upgradable to 32 GB, the drive is a Class 40 SSD, and it is all for about the same price.

 

The setting is heavy office use and I need the system to be robust and dependability is a must. I do not plan on upgrading to a newer machine for many years.

 

With that framework, I am curious, would you stay with the Latitude that seems maxed out, or go with the Precision that offers some room to grow? If I go with the Precision, do you think it is worth it to upgrade to the Xeon E3-1505M v5 processor for $70 more? The upgrade to a High Performance Class 50 SSD for another $50? Go from 16GB to 32GB of RAM for $170?

 

Finally, I am a fan of traditional docking stations, which I would lose the ability to use by going to the Precision. Any thoughts on USB docks?

 

Thanks for setting me straight guys!


Edited by hamluis, 04 August 2016 - 05:37 PM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Buying New - Hamluis.


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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 06:16 PM

I like the unit that is expandable in the future, without the need to max things out now, wait for later.  Docking stations are needed by those that don't have enough  hard drive space but like the option of a larger monitor and other peripherals not easily portable.



#3 jonuk76

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 06:26 PM

The "U" processors are ultra low power and tend to be used in smaller, lighter laptops than the "HQ" type which are much more powerful, but use more power, and will tend to be used in desktop replacement type laptops.  Clearly the i7-6820HQ is a much faster processor than the i7-6600U, as it has twice the number of cores, as well as a higher clock speed.  The difference between the i7-6820HQ and the Xeon is very modest though.  I guess it comes down to whether you want more power (the Precision) or portability.

 

FYI, Comparison on Intel Ark - http://ark.intel.com/compare/88192,88970,89608

Passmark CPU comparison - http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp%5B%5D=2659&cmp%5B%5D=2637&cmp%5B%5D=2608

 

16 Gb is already generous for most uses.  I sometimes have tens of browser tabs, and five or six major applications open at the same time, and really am not near maxing out the 16 Gb on my PC.  Personally I wouldn't bother with upgrading to 32 Gb at this time (presumably it can be done at a later date if necessary).  Perhaps with specific uses, like running several large virtual machines at the same time, more of a case can be made.


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#4 jkesselr

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 07:48 PM

Update guys: So my Dell rep got back to me and, while the prices of the systems online are very close, the price of the systems after all rebates are applied is nearly $1,000 after buying a new USB dock (since my existing dock will not work). I now question the value of going with the Precision at this time, as the difference in price is 1/3 or more of the cost of a new machine in the future. As for the speed of the processor, will someone utilizing this machine in an office setting notice the speed difference between the U and HQ processors? Most work is done with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (incorporating video playback into the PowerPoint slideshows. 



#5 jkesselr

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 07:48 PM

Update guys: So my Dell rep got back to me and, while the prices of the systems online are very close, the price of the systems after all rebates are applied is nearly $1,000 after buying a new USB dock (since my existing dock will not work). I now question the value of going with the Precision at this time, as the difference in price is 1/3 or more of the cost of a new machine in the future. As for the speed of the processor, will someone utilizing this machine in an office setting notice the speed difference between the U and HQ processors? Most work is done with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (incorporating video playback into the PowerPoint slideshows.



#6 SEANIA

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 09:46 PM

 As for the speed of the processor, will someone utilizing this machine in an office setting notice the speed difference between the U and HQ processors? Most work is done with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint (incorporating video playback into the PowerPoint slideshows.

 

The HQ one is literally twice the CPU the U one is, but with what you've described doing it won't make a difference in the slightest which you use. So go with the cheaper option. 

 

 

 If I go with the Precision, do you think it is worth it to upgrade to the Xeon E3-1505M v5 processor for $70 more?

The upgrade to a High Performance Class 50 SSD for another $50?

Go from 16GB to 32GB of RAM for $170?

It's not worth it, for what you do, to get the Xeon over the i7 U.

 

Nothing you'd do would benefit from the faster SSD. Dell someitmes uses different SSD brands across classes. So it might actually end up that the lower class SSD is a more reliable, better brand, anyways. 

 

That's a pretty insane price jump for RAM, but that aside 32GB of RAM is way overkill for what you described. 16GB is more then enough (even that's quite a bit overkill). 

 

The setting is heavy office use and I need the system to be robust and dependability is a must. 

 

Perscion laptops are made to be mobile workstations. They're made for tasks that heavily stress the hardware to their limit, having tons of different professional devices plugged into it at once leveraging it for communication with software, and are essentially portable powerful desktops just short of severs. They're used for things like professional 4k and 8k video editing, CAD work in engineering or other 3D modeling, scientific simulation workloads, ETC. They are heavier machines built to take anything thrown at them with ease.

 

Latitude laptops are made for in office use like you described. They're made for showing off and setting up presentations. Are made to look visualizing pleasing so clients aren't put off by this big hulk of a device you brought in (though Dell seems to be trying to add that to the Perscion line to). They are made to have good battery life so you can work on things in coffee shops, parks, on a car or plane ride. They are also very light for constant and easy transport. 

 

 

The Latitude is for you. It won't be as physically durable as the Perscion, but it doesn't need to be. 


Edited by SEANIA, 03 August 2016 - 09:47 PM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#7 jonuk76

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 12:04 PM

I'm sure the 6600U will handle those tasks just fine - they are not particularly taxing.  If the work is more towards content creation (e.g. video editing rather than just playing video) then I'd think the faster processor would be well worth it.


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