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Seeking advice for building new computer


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#1 Cawickeng

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 01:43 AM

Hi I'm currently deciding on a desktop setup for casual browsing use (might do some gaming but nothing really intensive). My most intensive software will likely be MATLAB and other engineering-related simulation and calculation software. Also, I live in Australia.

I have some questions regarding an ideal build for me. Firstly, what functional difference is there between the Intel 1151 and Intel 1150 microprocessors? What capacity on the power supply should be sufficient for my needs/parts (without risking being insufficient as has happened to me in the past)? Does the manufacturer really matter that much? Is paying $20 more for Corsair as opposed to Kingston etc. really worth it?

 

Will the GTX950 be able to handle Skyrim using realENB mods? Or Fallout 4 and its mods?

Also, which component directly affects the capability of a computer to load HQ images. I'm talking 15000 x 15000, 20mb images. Using my current computer, my memory usage clocks out at 4gb (my total RAM) whenever I open such an image and takes up to 3 minutes to load (using Windows Photo Viewer). I also get 'not responding' warnings on my browsers a lot of the time, as well as white screens, which takes ages to load (1-2 minutes sometimes, if not more).

I don't have a set budget but it would ideally be under $1400 AUD (I plan to keep the peripherals/operating system for use when I replace this computer for later use so I think that would be a good value).

Some of the parts I'm thinking of getting is:

CPU - Intel S1151 Core i5 6400 2.7GHz Quad Core /Intel S1151 Core i5 6400 2.7GHz (prefer an i5 over i3 just so it doesn't get outdated too quickly

Motherboard - appropriate for the cpu is all I need. 

Memory -www.computeralliance.com.au/8gb-ddr4-kingston-kvr21n15s8/8-(1x8g)-2133mhz-ram-modulewww.computeralliance.com.au/8gb-ddr3-corsair-cmv8gx3m1a1600c11-(1x8g)-1600mhz-value-ram-module
Need 16GB ram for my simulations so I will be aiming for two 8GB RAM modules.

Video - Nvidia GTX950 (just don't want to get outdated as I said I may be doing some gaming, not sure what kind though)

PSU - thinking of a 500W PSU, not sure if sufficient for the build.

SSD - Samsumg 2.5' 750 EVO Series

 

Tbh, I don't mind using a 64GB version of the Samsung EVO if it were available. Mainly need it for my OS and programs.

HDD:

 

2TB WD 3.5" SATA 6Gb/s Purple SV HDD PN WD20PURX

 

Case: Unsure about this. I remember back in the day all the gamers ran Antec 900/2s and they were pretty affordable and looked nice. But I've also heard about MicroATXs and I like their compact design (if I could choose)

Cooler - Do I need an 'aftermarket' cooler or is the stock cooler sufficient for my needs? I do not intend to overclock.

Network adapter -

 

USB Wireless-N TP-Link WN821N 300Mbps Network Adapter

 

I have NBN at home and will be connecting wirelessly. Can anyone recommend the best and most efficient method of connecting wirelessly these days? I am aware that some use network cards etc.

 

Peripherals

Keyboard - Razer Blackwidow Tournament 2014
Want a good, cheap mechanical keyboard, nothing too fancy with backlit lights cos that gets old for me quickly.

 

Mouse -Logitech G602
Have been personally recommended this mouse and it seems to be pretty decent for its price.

Monitor -

 

21.5" LG 22M37D-B LED Monitor

Doesn't have to be large, have resolution higher than 1080p although I was recommended to use 2 monitors for convenience.

Software

OS - Windows 10 Home Edition

P.S.

Can anyone recommend a decent headset? I'm not an audiophile but I prefer noise cancellation and just an overall comfortable headset that can cover my ears completely and has decent sound quality.


Edited by Cawickeng, 03 August 2016 - 05:51 AM.


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 04:25 AM

- Does "engineering-related simulation and calculation software" include software that utilizes many cores? If yes, then I would replace CPU. Difference between LGA1150 and LGA1151 is DDR3 support vs DDR4 support. This may also affect on motherboard choice.

 

- GTX950 is not very good choice for future, AMD RX series is much better.

 

- 500W PSU is enough if high quality.

 

- For SSD, 120GB will become too small quickly, I recommend 240/250GB one. At Computeralliance, Crucial BX200 is quite cheap, too bad that's TLC too. kingston v300 is geenrally bad but at least it has MLC http://www.computeralliance.com.au/240gb-kingston-2.5-ssdnow-v300-low-profile-7mm-sata-6gb/s-ssd-drive-pn-sv300s37a/240g-save-$45

 

- Aftermarket cooler is recommended, no matter what CPU.

 

- Windows 10 should be retail version.



#3 Cawickeng

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 04:36 AM

- Does "engineering-related simulation and calculation software" include software that utilizes many cores? If yes, then I would replace CPU. Difference between LGA1150 and LGA1151 is DDR3 support vs DDR4 support. This may also affect on motherboard choice.

 

- GTX950 is not very good choice for future, AMD RX series is much better.

 

- 500W PSU is enough if high quality.

 

- For SSD, 120GB will become too small quickly, I recommend 240/250GB one. At Computeralliance, Crucial BX200 is quite cheap, too bad that's TLC too. kingston v300 is geenrally bad but at least it has MLC http://www.computeralliance.com.au/240gb-kingston-2.5-ssdnow-v300-low-profile-7mm-sata-6gb/s-ssd-drive-pn-sv300s37a/240g-save-$45

 

- Aftermarket cooler is recommended, no matter what CPU.

 

- Windows 10 should be retail version.

I am not sure. MATLAB and AutoCAD are probably the two most intensive softwares that I will use (maybe Microsoft Visual Studio).  How exactly do you check how many cores a certain software uses?

 

Which AMD GPU would you recommend?

 

How do you determine the quality?  Brands? If so, which brand? Thermaltake?

 

I'm only planning to use the SSD for OS and programs. I intend to keep all my files in the HDD. Also, can you define what those abbreviated terms mean?

 

I'm not planning to overclock though.  In any case, which aftermarket cooler is both reliable and relatively cheap?



#4 SEANIA

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 05:01 AM

Firstly, what functional difference is there between the Intel 1151 and Intel 1150 microprocessors? 

 

The 1151 processors use a newer manufacturing tech that allows them to run cooler and more electrically efficient. It also makes them a little more powerful, but not by much. Only about 10 to 15 percent.

They have more powerful integrated graphics, but that doesn't really matter if you're getting a dedicated graphics card anyways. 

Almost forgot, they use DDR4 RAM instead of DDR3 RAM. DDR4 is twice as fast and uses half the power of DDR3.

 

 

What capacity on the power supply should be sufficient for my needs/parts (without risking being insufficient as has happened to me in the past)? Does the manufacturer really matter that much? 

 

Anything over 400 watts that's of quality.

A lot of people will tell you that you need 1000 watt power supply or something else ridiculous like that, but those people obviously haven't looked at the real power draw of parts before. 

 

Manufacturer maters a lot when it comes to power supplies.

 

Cheap ones tend to-

  • Not meet their quoted power output
  • Have very low maximum safe temperature before part failure (they tend to catch fire a lot)
  • Lack internal circuit breakers (if it fails, it's taking everything connected to it with it)
  • No overload protection (same thing as that^)
  • Have huge voltage ripple (the voltage it supplies can be over to 300mv off what it's suppose to. Shortening the life of all parts connected to it). 
  • Have insufficient cooling for all but the best case scenario conditions. (Again, fire)
  • No warranty or customer support 
  • Low efficiency, and/or not meeting their quoted efficiency. (By just using it, your computer can draw over 10% more from the wall then it otherwise would be).  
  • Little to no power cleaning. (if the wall voltage isn't exactly perfect, that imperfection caries over to all internal components) 

Basically, they're time bombs waiting to kill whatever computer they're put in.

On the flip side, a high quality power supply does the exact opposite of all of that, and will often outperform its rated specs. Helping otherwise low quality parts perform longer then they may have been rated to. 

 

 

Also, which component directly affects the capability of a computer to load HQ images. I'm talking 15000 x 15000, 20mb images. Using my current computer, my memory usage clocks out at 4gb (my total RAM) whenever I open such an image and takes up to 3 minutes to load (using Windows Photo Viewer). I also get 'not responding' warnings on my browsers a lot of the time, as well as white screens, which takes ages to load (1-2 minutes sometimes, if not more).

 

For the pictures it's a combination of a lot of different things. The main two though being that Windows 10 has garbage media viewing software (well really windows 10 in general), and hard drive access time.

Using a SSD instead of a standard HardDiskDrive, and installing Windows 10 in UEFI mode, does a lot in speeding that up. 

 

As for the browser. A combination of Windows 10 being terrible, and a slow internet connection. Would make sure the browser you are using is up to date. As page incompatibility can cause that to happen as well. Oh yeah and you should be using Chrome to avoid the incompatibility thing. 

 

 Is paying $20 more for Corsair as opposed to Kingston etc. really worth it?

 

RAM manufacturer doesn't really matter. RAM speed doesn't matter much either, outside of scenarios that need to constantly dump and fill it. RAM is just sorta RAM.

Most come with a lifetime warranty, because that's how trivial its stability is now. 

 

Will the GTX950 be able to handle Skyrim using realENB mods? Or Fallout 4 and its mods?

 

Yeah that's fine. Should be able to grab one for pretty cheap since the newer stuff just came out. 

 

MATLAB and other engineering-related simulation and calculation software

Some of the parts I'm thinking of getting is:

 

I'm not going to copy the whole list of parts. Will shorten the response as much as I can. None of the webpage links work properly. Might just be because I'm in the US.

 

CPU: You're running engineering simulations, and mass calculations. It'd do you a lot of good to up to a i7 (the i7-6700 for example, not the K variant), or one of the Xeon CPUs that are i7's with the integrated graphics removed (they can cost 100$ less then a i7) like the Intel Xeon E3-1230 v5. That Xeon would even be a better option then a i7 for stability reasons. As they're made for professional use. 

 

Motherboard: Any cheap socket 1151 motherboard will do. Preferably from MSI, AsRock, or ASUS. Again the shop links you posted wont work, so I cant link you a related board from that site. 

 

Memory: Only the first option is usable. The 1151 socket uses DDR4 RAM and the 2nd option you listed is DDR3. (there are rare 1151 boards that can use DDR3, but your use would benefit from the DDR4)

 

PSU: Like I said, any decent 400 watt or higher PSU will do. EVGA and Corsair are both good brands for that. The system should only draw around 350 watts at max load. 

 

Video Card: The card you picked is a good choice for what you described. Your engineering software might even be able to leverage it for more compute power.

 

SSD/HDD: You listed the same one under HDD as SSD, was that a mistake? Would up to a 240GB Samsung drive. 

 

Case: Antec still makes nice quality cases. Getting one of theirs again certainly wouldn't be a bad move. 

 

Cooler: Like I said the new 1151 socket processors run cool. Unlike older models (that make people think this line is the same), the stock cooler that comes with them should be fine. 

 

Network Adapter: TP-Link makes good networking cards. However I would opt for a internal PCIe wireless card from them instead. Better then having something hanging off and using one of your USB ports that you might bump into.

 

Keyboard: I know you may have a preference for ten-keyless keyboards, but a lot of professional software requires the use of a keypad for full functionality. Would check your software to see if it is or isn't a requirement. 

 

That keyboard uses mechanical switches meant for playing games, and thus have very little tactile feedback. Programmers, writers, and people who professionally rely on their keyboard tend to use keyboards with CherryMX Brown switches or CherryMX Blue switches. As those two provide lots of feedback and reassurance that the key they pressed is actually pressed. whatever tech site you're using should have some way to filter for those two switch types. 

 

That said, keyboards are entirely a personal preference. I'd recommend, if possible, finding a computer store that'd let you try out different types of keyboards in the store. As no amount of us describing them to you could compare to trying them for yourself to see what you like. You could buy the highest quality keyboard ever made, but if you don't like how it feels and it's a pain to use...then what good is it?

 

Mouse: That is a good high quality mouse. I 2nd the choice. Mouses (mice?) are also like keyboards in the way that they're very much a personal preference thing. Again, that's a very high quality mouse, but if you hate how it feels then how are you suppose to use it? Any good computer store should carry that mouse. If you can, go into one and ask to try it before deciding on purchasing it. 

 

MonitorThat's a good option, and yes having two would be very beneficial. Once you have two you'll never want to go back to using one again. Considering what you're doing, even three might be a advantage (that's something you should personally decided later down the road after using two though). 


Edited by SEANIA, 03 August 2016 - 05:03 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#5 Cawickeng

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 05:49 AM

@SEANIA

 

Sorry I didn't realise that my links were dead.  

Okay I will decide to get a motherboard with DDR4 compatibility (I just heard they don't have any real benefit).  

 

What PSU brand would you recommend? Thermaltake?  

 

Which components require a good brand and which don't?

 

When I talk about the image issue, it's with my current computer, which is running Windows 7 with 4GB ram, i5 650 cpu and integrated graphics (no SSD).

 

And sorry I did not realise that I linked the wrong HDD. It's meant to be just a standard 7200 rpm WD 2TB HDD. I intend to put all of my files in there and all of my programs and OS in the SSD.  Is that a good plan?  I know gamers frequently maneuver their steam files back and forth between the two depending on which games they are currently playing.  But I think 128GB is sufficient for any programs that I may run.

 

My internet connection is decent 100 Mbps.  It's not lagging, it's already loaded. It's just that whenever I run a lot of programs, certain (or all) browser tabs freeze and turn white, followed closely by a 'not responding' warning.

 

 

CPU: I see. So what exactly is the difference between an i5 and an i7? Just higher clock speeds and more cores?

 

Motherboard: Would this one be sufficient?

 

ASUS S1151 MicroATX H110M-K DDR4 Motherboard

PSU: How are Antec/Coolermaster/Thermaltake as brands?

 

GPU: Okay, some people have recommended to me the AMD RX 420.  

 

HDD: Yeah it's meant to be a 2TB WD 7200rpm one.

 

Case: Okay. I heard that I should match the motherboard type (micro-atx etc) to the case.

 

Cooler: What 1151 cpus do you define as 'new'?

 

Network Adapter: Will do, I've been recommended that option too. So does the 'wifi interface' pop up on the bottom-right of the screen like it does for laptops? Or do I have to install certain drivers?

 

Keyboard: I have found Cherry MX keyboards and they are branded Rapoo and Cougar? Are they good brands?



#6 SEANIA

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 06:36 AM

Okay I will decide to get a motherboard with DDR4 compatibility (I just heard they don't have any real benefit).  

 

Your very specific use might benefit from it. That said, even though there are some (very very very few) socket 1151 boards that can use DDR3. The socket 1151 CPUs in general have problems trying to use it, and were built to be used with DDR4. Why Intel even made DDR3 an option for it, I don't know. (you can't use standard DDR3 either. Have to get hard to find low voltage DDR3 for it). 

 

 

What PSU brand would you recommend? Thermaltake?  

 

PSU: How are Antec/Coolermaster/Thermaltake as brands?

 

Antec is good, CoolerMaster is hit or miss, and Thermaltake is also hit or miss. I'd recommend EVGA, Antec, and Corsair. 

 

 

Which components require a good brand and which don't?

 

Graphics card, power supply, wireless card, and motherboard all need ot be of quality.

Case, fans, cooler, RAM, and the optical disc drive can all be cheap. 

SSDs are.... are a weird mix. In that there are good cheap brands like ADATA, but there are lots of no-name brands and they should all be avoided. If you're serious about your drive never failing though then Samsung is the way to go. 

HDD. There are only... four? Main HDD manufactures. Think it's Toshiba, Seagate, Western Digital (WD), and HGST. They all make good and bad models of drives. So read the reviews of a drive you buy form any of them. 

 

When I talk about the image issue, it's with my current computer, which is running Windows 7 with 4GB ram, i5 650 cpu and integrated graphics (no SSD).

My internet connection is decent 100 Mbps.  It's not lagging, it's already loaded. It's just that whenever I run a lot of programs, certain (or all) browser tabs freeze and turn white, followed closely by a 'not responding' warning.

 

Ohhhhh ok. In that case the integrated GPU is at fault for it. Intel didn't get serious about their integrated graphics till awhile after that CPU was out.

 It's the problem for both the pictures and browser.

 

But I think 128GB is sufficient for any programs that I may run.

 

You can make it work, but it'll be a hassle. Just make sure to be on top of your data management if you go with the 120GB. 

 

CPU: I see. So what exactly is the difference between an i5 and an i7? Just higher clock speeds and more cores?

 

In the desktop classification of the i5 and i7. (laptops classify them differently) Both the i5 and i7 (on the 1151 socket) use the same quad core CPU (4 core).

The difference between them is that the i7 has something called "hyper-threading" enabled. It, in a basic sense, allows for each core to be used twice each CPU cycle. In a way, artificially doubling the amount of "cores" on the CPU that the computer sees to 8. 

According to Intel the latest version hyper-threading on the 1151 socket series has up to a 50% performance boost over not using it. Real world results are less then that though. 

The top end i7 is also clocked higher then the top end i5. 

 

 

Back to the hardware. 

 

Motherboard: Yes.

 

GPU: I think you mean RX480. For games it'd be better, but professional use software favors Nvidia cards, and the RX480 is a AMD card. So if your engineering software can use video cards as a processor aid, it most likely only supports Nvidia cards like the GTX 950. 

 

HDD: That's a perfectly fine HDD. 

 

Case: Yes. You can fit a micro ATX board in a full-sized ATX case though, as well as micro ATX cases. 

 

Cooler: All 1151 CPUs. Intel has put out a new socket with every new CPU generation release for the past while. The "old" CPUs I was referring to would be those on the 1150 socket. 

 

Network Adapter: Yes, it just pops up like it would on a laptop. You do have to install drivers for it to work (it should come with a disc), but there isn't any add-on software with a alternate interface if that's what you're asking. 

 

Keyboard: CherryMX is a key-switch manufacturer (for the most part they don't make keyboards themselves). They sell said switches to companies like Ducky, DAS keyboards, Corsair, Cougar, ETC to use in keyboards they make. I wouldn't recommend Rapoo or Cougar, but as long as they're using the CherryMX branded switches you should be fine. 


Edited by SEANIA, 03 August 2016 - 07:10 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#7 Cawickeng

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 02:03 AM

@SEANIA

 

Okay I think I will stick with an i5 since i7s are a lot more expensive ($200 more).  

 

You say that the integrated GPU is responsible for my computer taking so long to load the high-quality pictures. So what GPU can load a 30000 x 30000 image easily? Can the GTX950 that I've initially selected load it with ease?

 

CPU: Which i5 CPU would you recommend?

 

Motherboard: I was told that the ASUS S1151 MicroATX H110M-K DDR4 Motherboard does not have HD audio. Does this mean that I need to have a set of speakers? Or do I just need a soundcard?

 

GPU: As I said earlier, will the GTX950 be able to handle loading images of that size easily?  Also, can it handle Fallout 4/Skyrim ENB mods?

 

HDD: Okay I will select that.

 

Case: Once I have properly confirmed the motherboard type, I will pick the appropriate case. 

 

Network Adapter: 

PCI Wireless-N TP-Link WN851ND 300Mbps Network Card TL-WN851ND

Is the above network card a good one?

 

Keyboard:  Hm I can't find any brands for CherryMX other than those two in my retailer store.

 

So what other components will I need?  Sound card?  

 

You said that the new 1151 socket CPUs have sufficient cooling if I'm not gaming intensively?



#8 SEANIA

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 06:04 AM

You say that the integrated GPU is responsible for my computer taking so long to load the high-quality pictures. So what GPU can load a 30000 x 30000 image easily? Can the GTX950 that I've initially selected load it with ease?

 Literally anything made recently. The integrated graphics on the i5-6400 are overkill for it. 

It's not that loading the image requires a strong GPU, it doesn't at all. Even a new modern cheap-O 250$ laptop could do that. It's just that the integrated graphics in your current laptop are really, really, bad.

 

Motherboard: I was told that the ASUS S1151 MicroATX H110M-K DDR4 Motherboard does not have HD audio. Does this mean that I need to have a set of speakers? Or do I just need a soundcard?

Unlike laptops, desktops do not have built in speakers (there are rare exceptions). Sound cards do not have built in speakers either. 

You have to use your own speakers, or headphones, for it. Anything that plugs into a standard 1/8th inch (3.5mm) jack (the headphone jack on a smart phone) will work. 

 

Network Adapter: 

PCI Wireless-N TP-Link WN851ND 300Mbps Network Card TL-WN851ND

Is the above network card a good one?

That is a PCI wireless card. The motherboard would need a PCIe (sometimes spelled out as "PCI express")network card.  Such as the TP-LINK TL-WN881ND

 

CPU: Which i5 CPU would you recommend?

The i5-6400, i5-6500, and i5-6600 are all good choices and would all be fine.

Avoid the i5-6600k, or any i5 with letters after the name, like "T" or  "P" for instance. 

 

You said that the new 1151 socket CPUs have sufficient cooling if I'm not gaming intensively?

You miss-interpreted me then. You could game extremely heavily and it be perfectly fine. You could run a program ,designed purely to make the CPU make as much heat as possible, for 12 hours straight, and it would still be fine on the stock cooler. 

There is nothing you could do to make it over heat short of blocking all the computers air vents, but that would make any cooling system fail. 

 

 

So what other components will I need?  Sound card?  

You don't need to buy a sound card. The motherboard has one built in. There are a lot of people who are stuck in the 90's that think all computers need aftermarket sound cards, but they are misinformed. The sound card that's built in can play sounds at up to 192,000 hz. I doubt you've even ever seen, or heard of, a pair of headphones that could go up to that. Even most studio quality recordings only go up to 48,000 hz. 

Sorry.... people saying they need to buy a aftermarket sound card is a pet peeve of mine. 

 

But yes there is one thing you might want to get. A cheap SATA DVD drive, or a SATA Blu-ray drive if you'd want to watch blu-rays. Most people don't care for them and do everything digitally now, but you'd be surprised how often they come in handy. 

 

Keyboard:  Hm I can't find any brands for CherryMX other than those two in my retailer store.

Weird that those are the only brands they have with CherryMX switches. Well if you can, I'd still try them out in a physical store, and every other keyboard they may have on display. The important thing is to find one that you like. 

 

GPU: As I said earlier, will the GTX950 be able to handle loading images of that size easily?  Also, can it handle Fallout 4/Skyrim ENB mods?

I already covered the picture thing. It'd handle both the games extremely well (would run Skyrim on max settings with tons of mods smoothly). 


Edited by SEANIA, 04 August 2016 - 06:07 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#9 Cawickeng

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 08:08 PM

@SEANIA

 

Okay I see. I thought that using that particular motherboard, the speakers cannot output HD audio.  So what headsets do you recommend?  I'm not an audiophile, just looking for a headset that has pads covering up my full ear (if that's possible) and overall comfortable.

 

Computer Alliance doesn't have that particular model. It has 

PCIe Wireless-N TP-Link TL-WN781N 150Mbps Network Card

Is that sufficient?

 

DVD-writer

DVD Writer LiteOn 24x SATA Black 

Case: I'm finding a lot of cases that have an inbuilt PSU (say 500W).  Are these reliable or is it better to buy a separate PSU?  

 

The total cost of the setup (including peripherals and OS) seems huge.  Even excluding them, it's nearly 1300 AUD.



#10 SEANIA

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 10:15 PM

Okay I see. I thought that using that particular motherboard, the speakers cannot output HD audio.  So what headsets do you recommend?  I'm not an audiophile, just looking for a headset that has pads covering up my full ear (if that's possible) and overall comfortable.

Wait. Headphones or a headset? A headset has a built in mic. Where headphones are just speakers. 

PCIe Wireless-N TP-Link TL-WN781N 150Mbps Network Card

That'd work. 

Case: I'm finding a lot of cases that have an inbuilt PSU (say 500W).  Are these reliable or is it better to buy a separate PSU?  

I'm sure the cases them selves are fine, but don't use the PSU they come with. They are garbage quality and will do all the bad things I said. A lot of cheap case manufactures bulk buy the cheap garbage ones (cost then all of 15 AUD a piece I imagine), and then try to bundle it in with their case to make them seem like more of a value. Yes buy a separate one if possible. 

The total cost of the setup (including peripherals and OS) seems huge.  Even excluding them, it's nearly 1300 AUD. 

That's Australia for you. Electronics are extremely marked up over there (the importing and shipping fees are astronomical from what I hear).  So are games. A GPU that'd cost 200$ USD in the US would cost a little over 400 AUD in Australia.

 

If price is a concern I'd look into the 2nd hand market for your area. You could probably get a used 1080p monitor for half the price of a new one. Infact I bet you could pickup all but the CPU and motherboard by doing so for a much cheaper price. 

The Australian site for doing that would be-

 http://www.gumtree.com.au/

 

Go ahead and look for a GTX 950 on there. I guarantee you could get it for a chunk less the you would new in store. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#11 Cawickeng

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 02:24 AM

@SEANIA

 

Currently, I'm undecided between headsets and headphones. Main concern is the comfort (my current cheap headset is really uncomfortable and hurts my ears after extended use).

 

My friend actually recommended me to get a laptop instead and I'm still undecided on the matter. The only that I'm looking into has an inbuilt steelseries keyboard but I am unsure of its sensitivity. I've used laptop keyboards and I don't like the feel of them (feel like taps and the feedback is poor).  It also offers a decent MSI gaming mouse).  Either way, I would need to buy a monitor.

 

One question that I have is: how do monitors work? Say I have a 21' monitor and a 23' monitor at 1920 x 1080 resolution. Does the 23' monitor show MORE of a page (say word document) or is the screen ENLARGED (text is larger etc.)?

And how does that apply to a dual monitor? Say I have two identical 23' monitors at 1920 x 1080 resolution and I use the 'extended display' setting. Does that mean that the screen is split into two and the combined screens shows MORE of a page or is the combined screens ENLARGED (each having half of the same screen that one monitor would show but twice the width, horizontally or laterally)? 


 


 


Edited by Cawickeng, 06 August 2016 - 02:25 AM.


#12 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 07:59 AM

If you have a 21" screen at the same resolution as the 23" screen on the 23" screen everything would look bigger. The advantage of having 2 monitors is considered by most to be that you can do multiple things at a time. Combined screens and how they work depends on the program. The easiest way to figure it out is try it yourself.

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#13 SEANIA

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 10:29 AM

One question that I have is: how do monitors work? Say I have a 21' monitor and a 23' monitor at 1920 x 1080 resolution. Does the 23' monitor show MORE of a page (say word document) or is the screen ENLARGED (text is larger etc.)?

Having a physically larger monitor makes the things look physically bigger. It takes the same exact picture and stretches it out more to cover more space.  

Having a higher resolution gives you more of a page to work with. That gives you more "working" space for you to have multiple things on screen at once. 

 

And how does that apply to a dual monitor? Say I have two identical 23' monitors at 1920 x 1080 resolution and I use the 'extended display' setting. Does that mean that the screen is split into two and the combined screens shows MORE of a page or is the combined screens ENLARGED (each having half of the same screen that one monitor would show but twice the width, horizontally or laterally)? 

Adding a 2nd screen adds a entirely separate 2nd screen for that "working space". 

 

I have some pictures somewhere....

 

DesktopMatchingFull_zpsc71d943f.png

 

That is when I had three monitors hooked up, all of the same resolution.  With a single display, you'd only get that center space to work with where the taskbar is. However by adding two additional screens to the left and right. I then get two more of those spaces to display things in. Each additional space being where a monitor is, and anything put into that space is what is displayed on the 2nd (or in my case was a 3rd) screen. It's just that when you take a screenshot it all looks like I was using one continues screen. When in reality it was 3 separate screens.

I could have a game running on one monitor, a movie running on the 2nd, and chat windows open on the 3rd. 

 

Does that make any sense? 

My friend actually recommended me to get a laptop instead and I'm still undecided on the matter. 

If you think desktops are expensive, then you haven't seen laptops. Laptops are things you only buy where using one is required....or you have money to burn. As getting similar performance out of a laptop as a desktop, is going to literally cost twice as much. Laptop components are, by a very generalized definition, severely under-clocked desktop parts running at half speed. Unless you're required to move around a lot with your computer (IE- bring it to classes), then don't get one. 

Currently, I'm undecided between headsets and headphones. Main concern is the comfort (my current cheap headset is really uncomfortable and hurts my ears after extended use).

Would you have use for a microphone? That's the only difference between the two. Neither have inherently good or bad comfort-ability. That's entirely brand/model based. 

That said, headsets traditionally have bad sound quality, but if you're fine with the sound quality of cheap corner store headphones/earbuds then it won't matter to you. 

 

Would you want "over ear" or "on ear" ones?

With "on ear" the pads physically rest on your ears (hence the naming). Their downside is that some people find this uncomfortable over long periods of time. 

"Over ear" has the pads rest around your ear. Ideally having nothing ever touching your ear. The downside to them that your ears can get sweaty with prolonged use, and they are usually kind of bulky. 


Edited by SEANIA, 06 August 2016 - 10:31 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 


#14 Cawickeng

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 10:15 PM

@SEANIA

 

Okay I understand now.  Actually I've checked out some monitors and I've decided on a particular monitor as pcpartpicker has given it a decent review and it is at a good price and size.  

 

It is the BENQ 24" GL2460HM LED Monitor.  

 

I was planning on getting an IPS monitor but they seem to be too expensive to get a decent one.

 

As for the laptops, they're not that much more expensive ($150) and they have the advantage of portability and being operational during outages.  I did not notice that they're underclocked though.

 

WITHOUT Peripherals

 

This is the i5 desktop setup that I am looking at:

 

CPU

 

Intel S1151 Core i5 6400 2.7 GHZ Quad Core - $245

 

MotherboardASUS S1151 MicroATX H110M-K DDR4 Motherboard - $88

 

Memory: 8GB DDR4 Crucial CT8G4DFS8213 (1x8G) 2133MHz RAM Module (x 2) - $45 x 2 = $90

 

GPU: Gigabyte GTX960 2GB Mini-ITX PCIe Video Card PN GV-N960IXOC-2GD - $239

 

PSU - 600 Watt Antec VP600P Power Supply - $85

SSD - 120GB Samsung 850 EVO M.2 (2280) SATA SSD PN MZ-N5E120BW - $89

 

HDD: 1TB WD 3.5" 7200rpm SATA 6Gb/s Blue HDD PN WD10EZEX - $68

 

Case: Antec MicroATX NSK3100 Case Black (No PSU) - $69


Network adapter - PCIe Wireless-N TP-Link TL-WN781N 150Mbps Network Card $19 Operating System – Microsoft Windows 10 Home 32/64bit Retail USB Flash Drive PN KW9-00017 - $159 Question about the OS.  There are OEM versions available but I presume I can’t use them since my system is not OEM, right? Total Cost - $1294 AUD This is the i7 setup (same components except for CPU) Intel S1151 Core i7 6700 3.4GHz Quad Core CPU PN BX80662I76700 - $429 Total Cost - $1499 AUD   This is the laptop that I’ve been looking at MSI GP62 6QF-681AU 15.6" Core i7 Leopard Pro Gaming Notebook with 16G Ram

GP62 6QE Leopard Pro

·         Windows 10 Home / Windows 10 Pro

·         CPU: Intel Skylake Core i7 6700HQ 2.6GHz (6M Cache, up to 3.50 GHz) Quad Core CPU

·         GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce GTX 950M graphics with higher performance

·         Monitor: 15.6" GAME HUNTER

·         SSD: NVMe M.2 SSD by PCIe Gen3 X4 up to 2200MB/s speed(optional) – 128GB

·         HDD: 1TB 7200RPM

·         Keyboard: Steelseries

·         Mouse: MSI Wired Interceptor DS-B1 USB Gaming Mouse (BONUS!)

 

Total Cost for Laptop: $1645 AUD

Peripherals

Keyboard – Razer Wired BlackWidow Tournament 2014 Edition Mechanical USB Gaming Keyboard - $109

 

Mouse – Logitech G602 Wireless Gaming Mouse PN 910-003930 - $65


Monitor – 24" Benq GL2460 LED Monitor - $199

 

With a laptop, I am unsure if I will buy a separate keyboard and am unsure if I will like the mouse.  I will definitely buy the monitor though.  The main reason that I am considering a laptop is because I may need to bring it to work in the future.  I know a lot of people in the field who have to do this and without a laptop, I am limited to bringing my files on USB sticks and relying on the resources provided at work.

 

Total cost of Desktop with Peripherals: $1869 (with one monitor)

Total cost of Laptop with Peripherals: $1844 (with one monitor)



#15 SEANIA

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 01:11 AM

GPU: Gigabyte GTX960 2GB

GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce GTX 950M 

 

That^ is the main and big difference between the two. 

Best case scenario for the laptop, the laptop GTX 950M has a little under half the performance of the desktop grade GTX 960. You can't change out the GPU later with the laptop in case you were wondering. 

 There are OEM versions available but I presume I can’t use them since my system is not OEM, right?

You certainly can use those copies. 100% legal to do, case you were thinking it might've been questionable to do so. 

 

The difference between a OEM/system-builder copies and retail copies is small. That being that when you use a OEM copy, you give away all rights to technical support from Microsoft. The idea being that a OEM builder would be the one supplying the support and not Microsoft. Microsoft has terrible technical support though, and has been for awhile now. So there's not really any benefit to buying a retail copy, except if you want to own the physical DVD/box for it. 

 I did not notice that they're underclocked though.

·         CPU: Intel Skylake Core i7 6700HQ 2.6GHz (6M Cache, up to 3.50 GHz) Quad Core CPU

The desktop version of it runs at 3.4 Ghz and boosts to 4.0 Ghz. In case you were wondering how much they get under-clocked. 

Total cost of Desktop with Peripherals: $1869 (with one monitor)

Total cost of Laptop with Peripherals: $1844 (with one monitor)

I went over the math and something about it doesn't seem right, but they are pretty close. 

This is the i7 setup (same components except for CPU)

What do you mean?

The main reason that I am considering a laptop is because I may need to bring it to work in the future.  I know a lot of people in the field who have to do this and without a laptop, I am limited to bringing my files on USB sticks and relying on the resources provided at work.

That^ is a very good reason to have a laptop. You should get it for that reason alone. 


99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 





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