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Computer keeps shutting down. Even when idling!! Very serious issue.


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#1 nkim5252

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 07:28 PM

Hi guys, I originally started this post on Tom's Hardware, which can be viewed here: http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-3137886/computer-shutting-idling-issue.html

 

I've decided to bring this topic to Bleeping Computer in hopes for more opinions and answers. Any help is of course, much appreciated :)

 

CPU and GPU temps stay around 30C to 40C when idling. CMOS has been reset numerous times. All the cables are securely in place. It's undergone a fresh installation of Windows 10 not so long ago. I've opted to get a new graphics card because integrated graphics would refuse to work after I sold my 660 to a friend. Every time start my computer, it would immediately shut down and start up again in a loop. Even when the graphics card is removed.

However, my main issue computer shuts down at the most unexpected times. It's almost impossible to use demanding applications and even a simple web browse. Could anyone please help me?

Specs:
Intel Core i7 4770K
Asus STRIX GTX 970
Asrock Z87 Pro 3
G.SKILL Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3 1866
Corsair CX600 Power Supply
Corsair H110
Seagate 1TB HDD ST1000DM003
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260
Corsair Carbide 500R
Samsung Super‑WriteMaster SH‑224DB

 

Also, I should mention that none of the hardware was overclocked.


Edited by nkim5252, 29 July 2016 - 07:50 PM.


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#2 smax013

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 07:54 PM

Has it always done this? Or did this start happening?

If the latter, what (if anything) changed between the time it was working fine and started having problems?

Without any further information, my leading suspects would be either motherboard or the power supply.

#3 nkim5252

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 08:58 PM

Hey smax013!

 

Thanks for your contribution.

 

My desktop was built around December, 2013. It was working fine prior to switching out the GTX 660. I ended up selling it to a friend back in January. I purchased my GTX 970 in June. Between this time, I had issues trying to use onboard graphics. Every time I tried to run an application the utilizes this, it would freeze my entire session, forcing me to reboot my computer. Once I received my 970, which came from a working unit, I did a fresh install of Windows 10. It was then I started having issues with my computer unexpectedly shutting off. But even with the 970 out of the case, my computer would try to boot up, shuts off, and restart. Sometimes in a loop. It could take up to minutes to even get to the motherboard bootsplash.

 

I agree, my main two culprits would be either the power supply or the motherboard. Is there any way to check which piece of hardware caused the issue within Windows or the BIOS? (Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, I'm not this experienced with computers )


Edited by nkim5252, 29 July 2016 - 08:59 PM.


#4 smax013

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 10:02 PM

Hey smax013!
 
Thanks for your contribution.
 
My desktop was built around December, 2013. It was working fine prior to switching out the GTX 660. I ended up selling it to a friend back in January. I purchased my GTX 970 in June. Between this time, I had issues trying to use onboard graphics. Every time I tried to run an application the utilizes this, it would freeze my entire session, forcing me to reboot my computer. Once I received my 970, which came from a working unit, I did a fresh install of Windows 10. It was then I started having issues with my computer unexpectedly shutting off. But even with the 970 out of the case, my computer would try to boot up, shuts off, and restart. Sometimes in a loop. It could take up to minutes to even get to the motherboard bootsplash.


The fact that you has some issues with the onboard graphics might be independent of the issues you are having now. If the computer unexpectedly shutting off happened after the Windows 10 fresh install, then it is possible that the Windows install went bad. Have you tried re-installing it again? While my gut still says an issue with the motherboard or PSU, it is possible that maybe the Windows install (or the installation of the motherboard drivers during the fresh install) had some problem. And it would not hurt to try re-installing other than take up some of your time, which may or may not "hurt" depending on your time availability.
 

I agree, my main two culprits would be either the power supply or the motherboard. Is there any way to check which piece of hardware caused the issue within Windows or the BIOS? (Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question, I'm not this experienced with computers )


Not that I am aware of. Usually the best way to diagnose hardware issues is to isolate that piece of hardware. That either means taking the piece of hardware and trying it on another (preferably know working) computer OR get some known working or new hardware to try in the place of the questionable hardware. So, likely the easiest first option is to get a new PSU to try, whether you actually buy a new one or see if you borrow one from a friend (or another of your computers if you are a TOTAL computer nerd and have multiple computers) would be up to you. I suppose the other option is to test some of the electrical outputs from the various connectors of the PSU, but that is outside my area or expertise (I know enough that sticking my fingers after licking them in an electrical plug is not exactly a good idea :grinner:), so you will need someone else to help with that if you want to try to go that route. The advantage of starting with the PSU is that 1) having a backup PSU is not a bad thing to have; and 2) you can generally get a good PSU for less than a mobo many times.

I will add that if the issues you had with the onboard graphics IS related to the now shutting off issue, then that might point a little more to the motherboard. But, it is not clear (at least to me) if those two things are actually related.

#5 nkim5252

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 12:50 AM

Thanks for the input! As I mentioned before, I had issues where I couldn't even get passed my motherboard splashscreen because the computer would continuously power off and back on whenever I pressed the power buttons. However, if I were to test this, would a dual boot or a live CD take on the same effect as trying reinstalling Windows? I'm not quite sure if I'm willing to wipe my current installation.

 

I did a little research on power supply testing, as I'm not sure if I can obtain another unit, and came across this handy device: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005UZHB6G/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=1944687462&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B005CTCD6S&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=VWQPF81MWWHHARF17QHJ

 

Seems easier than using a multi-meter (which also happens to be an area outside my expertise too). I may perhaps look in to purchasing one. If it is indeed the power supply, I would be ecstatic as I am still backed by Corsair's 3 year warranty on CX models.

 

I'll keep you posted on this. In the meantime, do you suspect it could be another piece of hardware of peripheral that is causing this issue?



#6 smax013

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 01:40 AM

Would not hurt to try that PSU tester and see what it says.

I do not currently suspect any of the other hardware, but you could do some testing.

For example, pull one of the RAM DIMMs and see if anything changes. Then pull the other and put the first one pulled back in and see if anything changes. Try the RAM in the different DIMM slots.

Try removing the WiFi card and see if anything changes. Keep in mind that if it does change, then it could be the WiFi card or the PCI slot in the motherboard.

I really doubt the hard drive or the optical drive would cause this, but you could try disconnecting the optical drive to see if anything changes. Similarly, if disconnecting the optical drive, it could be the drive, the PSU, or maybe even the SATA port on the mobo.

I doubt a peripheral would do it, but then you did not list any of the peripherals (mouse, keyboard, printer, etc) that you have connected. To test them, you either borrow that type of peripheral from a friend or test your on another computer.




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