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Custom 'Testing' Network


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8 replies to this topic

#1 xxoorr

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:40 PM

Hello,
I am fixing printers and stuff like that...
I want to set up a network on my laptop, and the purpose would be whenever I am at client location to troubleshoot their printer I want to connect the machine to my laptop with my own network, because sometimes the copiers/printers has issues where the machine itself is fine, but the problem stays in the client internal network whether if it's a router issue for example or workstation connection problems, which is out of my scoop. 
So very often I am going to 'fix' issues and it turned up that the client actually experiencing problem with their network, or their PC, or driver.. well my idea is just to test the copiers on my own environment, so I can make sure where exactly the problem stays - if its for real in the copier, or it is somewhere on their internal network end.
How can I approach this? From what I can think of - I should get some mobile internet, 3G or whatever, so I can be connected not to the client network but to my own. Then I should reconfigure the printer settings temporary and connect it to my laptop network. After I make sure the machines is fine, I am getting the printer settings back to the client configuration.
Is there any point of such an actions?



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#2 ScathEnfys

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:52 PM

Yes, I can see how such a setup would be useful. However, a test network doesn't need to be able to connect to the internet. All you need is a router. However, there is the problem that your laptop may not have the drivers for your client's printer.
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#3 Trikein

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 11:00 PM

Don't most printers still have USB functionality? If so, wouldn't that isolate a printer problem from a network issue?  



#4 xxoorr

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 02:56 PM

Yes, I can see how such a setup would be useful. However, a test network doesn't need to be able to connect to the internet. All you need is a router. However, there is the problem that your laptop may not have the drivers for your client's printer.

 

Hi ScathEnfys can you please explain how the router will help me if I don't need to have internet connection, 

As for the drivers, I know the model number of the printers beforehand, so before I go somewhere, I am prepared and I have the specific driver installed on my laptop already.



#5 Kilroy

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 04:11 PM

Having been responsible for supporting network printers in a corporate environment I wouldn't bother.  Most places will set up the printers with static IP addresses.  The smart ones will use DHCP reservations.

 

You should be able to determine if the problem is with the printer or network with the proper questions or tests from their machine.

 

1.  Has it ever worked? (Always the first question to ask)

2.  Can anyone print to the printer?

3.  Can you ping the printer?

4.  Does the printer NIC have indicators lit?

 

You should be able to connect your machine to their LAN and print to the printer's IP if necessary, or they can provide you with a machine to do this.

 

The very few times having this hardware available wouldn't make it worth the purchase and carrying it around.



#6 ScathEnfys

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 11:16 PM

Hi ScathEnfys can you please explain how the router will help me if I don't need to have internet connection, 
As for the drivers, I know the model number of the printers beforehand, so before I go somewhere, I am prepared and I have the specific driver installed on my laptop already.

A router would act as a testbench allowing you to test various IP assignments for a network printer.
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#7 xxoorr

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 08:43 PM

Thank you guys for the help,

I don't think Kilroy got my concerns, I am trying to isolate the machine from their network, since I am trying to determine if the issues is into their network or in the machine itself whether is it driver related, wrong configuration or busted drum. So I think the greatest approach would be if I unplug the printer from the network and connect it to my PC via ethernet, now I can test in my 'own' network and if the machine is fine then I know where the problem stands. If I am not able to get it work on to my PC, then most likely the printer is busted. 

In this type of approach what setting should I apply on my PC after connect to the printer? I guess I shouldn't change anything on the printer but simply have to match my PC NIC IP and Subnet with the one set up on the printer to get on the same network?


Edited by xxoorr, 31 July 2016 - 08:43 PM.


#8 ScathEnfys

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 12:27 AM

I've not done too much with ad-hoc (routerless) networks... there's just too much to configure. If you have a cheap, non-wifi router and 2 internet cables, you can just hook everything up and let DHCP do its magic. That is considering the printer is configured to use DHCP, of course.
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#9 Kilroy

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 08:39 AM

xxoorr I understand your concerns, but they are unfounded.  I have supported network printers and very rarely is the network the issue.  You should be able to tell, based upon the reported issue where the problem lies.

 

A driver issue presents as a garbage print, usually many pages.  A drum issue presents as a repetitive print issue. A network issue presents as either someone or no one can print.  If no one can print you print a configuration page from the printer to verify functionality.

 

There should be no need to connect your computer to the printer.  If you did a cross over network cable would allow you to connect, but the time required wouldn't be worth your while as you would have to assign the computer and the printer IP addresses on the same network.






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