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perplexed: Unsupported Video Configuration Detected


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#1 MrArtIntell

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 12:11 AM

Please explain how is it possible for this problem to occur. While the monitor has always been plugged into the integrated vid connector (working fine for years until now), nor has any add-on graphic card ever been installed.

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#2 Platypus

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 02:23 AM

Well, in the absence of any information about your system and exactly what is occurring, I'll take a flying guess and suspect you might perhaps have a Dell and are seeing an on-screen notification at boot-up? If that's so, my next guesses would be possibly either your CMOS backup battery is going flat and the system settings are screwed up, or assuming the monitor connection is VGA, maybe a pin on the plug has tarnished and the ID signal isn't being received to detect the monitor.

If my guess is anything like right, first steps if not already tried would be to unplug, replug and jiggle the VGA connections at PC and monitor, try another VGA cable and/or monitor, and check video settings in BIOS setup if it can be accessed or try a new CMOS backup battery.

If I've guessed wrong, describe the system to us with model details etc and complete fault symptoms, and we'll try again.

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#3 MrArtIntell

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 05:45 AM

Thanks for the quick reply & sorry for forgetting the specs. Your flying guesssuspicion is on point, its a Dell & onscreen notice. I'll check the VGA pins on my return home in an hour'ish. In the meantime, I'll 'pick your brain'(forgive me for not 1st asking your permission haha)... How would U go about attaining a CMOS replacement?

#4 Platypus

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 06:22 AM

The majority of desktop systems use a 3V Lithium CR2032 cell as a CMOS backup battery. They last a number of years but eventually do need replacement, a simple enough process if you're happy to open up the case and swap the battery out of its holder, replacing it with a nice fresh one.

 

cmos.jpg


Edited by Platypus, 26 July 2016 - 06:24 AM.

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#5 MrArtIntell

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 06:46 AM

Thanks. If another monitor doesnt work, I'll replace the CMOS. What source would you recommend purchasing it from?

#6 Platypus

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 07:17 AM

Multiple store types should have them available, I see them in supermarkets, hardware chains, electronics shops. Probably best to get from somewhere that would have a high turnover so as not to get old stock. Most expensive would probably be somewhere specialist like a camera shop.


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#7 MrArtIntell

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 11:44 AM

Thanks for the detailed answer! By the way, I tried another monitor but same scenario. I'm sure you figured that would be the case. I even used the cmos from the another monitors'pc to no avail. Hopefully, a new cmos will work. I say that cause my bad luck with electronics. haha

#8 MrArtIntell

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 02:47 PM

"While you have the battery out, and the machine unplugged from the wall, clear the CMOS per the directions in your mobo manual. That way any mess left by the dying battery will be cleaned out."
Would that be the reason the other pc's cmos did not work?

Edited by MrArtIntell, 26 July 2016 - 02:47 PM.


#9 Platypus

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 09:39 PM

Yes, possibly. Some boards will hold their settings for several minutes, so the battery can be changed without losing them. If the settings are wrong, it might be necessary to use the CMOS CLR jumper. That was going to be my next suggestion if you met with no success. After that I'm out of ideas! (Other than being able to try a video card and see if the system will recognize that correctly.)

Edited by Platypus, 26 July 2016 - 09:41 PM.

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#10 MrArtIntell

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 07:45 AM

I'll get to work on the jumper in an hour or two, then I'll update you. Curiousity, besides age of the cmos, would extreme *heat* cause it to malfunction?

Edited by MrArtIntell, 27 July 2016 - 07:49 AM.


#11 Platypus

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 07:53 AM

Heat is not good for batteries, it would probably shorten its life. I doubt if it would create an actual malfunction of the battery, unless perhaps something like the computer being left in a hot car in the sun for days. But there are other heat sensitive components as well in a computer.

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#12 MrArtIntell

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 05:43 PM

Damn! I may have (yea, I sure did) inadvertently similuated the 'car in the sun' scenario, by leaving the windows shut in the small room, during the recent heatwave, while I was away for a few days.

#13 Platypus

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 08:07 PM

Temperatures inside a house will not be as extreme as in a car left in the sun. After some hours, cars in direct sun typically double the ambient external air temperature, houses don't do anything like that. If a battery is nearing the end of its life, heat or cold is likely to show it up, so if you hadn't had the heat wave and the battery was going to go anyway, it would probably have quietly done the same thing in another couple of months.

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#14 MrArtIntell

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 06:02 AM

I'm impressed with the thorough explanations, especially by a platypus. xD
I'll buy a new cmos. I should select factory reset in bios prior to adding new cmos?

#15 Platypus

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 07:26 AM

If you're referring to an option in the BIOS setup screen, then no, that sounds like the option to reset the computer back to how it was when it left the factory, by re-installing the original Windows and factory programs from a recovery partition on the hard drive.

I'd suggest checking on the mainboard in the computer to be sure it does have a CR2032 backup battery - 99.9% do but very rarely you'll find one that uses something different. Assuming you find that is the correct one, pop the old one out of its holder using a small screwdriver or similar, and then once you have the new battery, fit it in its place. The time without a battery should ensure the CMOS loses all voltage and resets to default BIOS settings without you having to find a jumper on the board to clear the CMOS. If you already had the CR2032 and did an immediate swap, it would probably be best to also find the CLR_CMOS or CLR_CLK jumper and move it to the clear position for 5 seconds or so then back where it came from. Then power up the computer and see if the error is gone. After doing this either way, you should need to access the BIOS setup screen to set the clock, and sometimes to specify the order of boot devices, although the standard order is usually good enough, at least for a start.

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