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What is it like to be a technical support technician? I need tips!


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#1 azisel

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 07:03 PM

Example:

How would you ask a customer if they know how to open a system unit?

How to ask them in a good way if the system unit is plugged in?

Because they might take it the rude way even you're just trying to troubleshoot the 1st level of possible cause.

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#2 CKing123

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 07:22 PM


How to ask them in a good way if the system unit is plugged in? 

 

That I can answer. Trick them! Say something along the lines of "sometimes its best if you unplug it, wait for a few minutes, and plug it back in". That way, they will notice its not plugged in, plug it in, and say it worked

 

http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2004/03/03/83244.aspx

 

-CKing


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#3 Queen-Evie

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 08:17 PM

Simply ask "are you comfortable with the idea of opening the case?".

 

"Let's start with the basics. Make sure it's plugged in, please check."

 

You can ask anything if you THINK like a person who is NOT tech inclined.



#4 azisel

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 12:21 PM

Thanks guys!

 

I have another question, what if the problem is beyond my knowledge, let's say I'm a level 1 support and the problem is something too technical, how do I pass the case to a level 2 tech? how to tell the customer?



#5 Animal

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 02:31 PM

"The problem currently appears to be above the level of service I am authorized to provide. Please, allow me to direct you to a technician who can continue to provide assistance to resolve your issue."

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#6 Trikein

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 06:13 PM

I would suggest asking your boss. Most of this should be included in training before you hit the floor. While all of these suggestions are good advice, most managers are jerks when it comes to call ratings, caring more about semantics then you actually fixing the problem. Always CYA.


Edited by Trikein, 24 July 2016 - 06:15 PM.


#7 azisel

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 08:14 PM

I would suggest asking your boss. Most of this should be included in training before you hit the floor. While all of these suggestions are good advice, most managers are jerks when it comes to call ratings, caring more about semantics then you actually fixing the problem. Always CYA.

 

that's good if they train me first! i would really appreciate it! I haven't talked to the manager yet since I was interviewed, but will do ask him just to be on the same page. and as for the tips thank you guys! this will really help me a lot! if anyone else have more tips please do reply here. Thanks!



#8 mjd420nova

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 08:49 PM

Having been in the field service industry for 40 years, I've learned to be VERY observant when first entering a clients office or laboratory.  Some clients have warranty stickers on them to keep those unskilled fingers out of the works.  Others have a very defined list of equipment and options that are available and users are allowed to swap their own parts.  One sticking point I have is the provision for workers to change into suitable clothing for the environment.  Coat and tie is for business but if I'm climbing a roof to reposition an antenna dish, coveralls and appropriate footwear is required.  Nothing like going to your next call covered in shingle grit (it gets everywhere) or you smell like a pesticide plant.  Even a small operation of techs should have a dispatch person and this is most important that the call taker have some technical background to properly detail the fault as described by the user and that this gets passed to the tech making the call.  Over a period of time you will collect a large list of numbers for manufacturers help desks and even cultivate some inside contacts.  Difficulties closing a call should be alerted to the dispatcher for escalation to another tech with the skills and knowledge or contact an outside consultant.  Every company has their own way of doing things but you are the tip of the sword and will be the contact that user remembers, good or bad.  Good Luck



#9 Trikein

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Posted 25 July 2016 - 10:57 PM

Any place that doesn't offer some basic form of training; run far away from! If they aren't training you, they aren't training anyone, which means even if you become experienced, you will be cleaning up other people's mistakes. I worked in a NOC that supported Avaya phone systems, including 911 call centers, and they prided themselves by learning everything "trial by fire" which is a enthusiastic way of saying they were too cheap/lazy to provide support material and training for their staff. It's all fun and games until bad technical support kills someone because your boss thought you could just "google-fu" it.


Edited by Trikein, 25 July 2016 - 10:57 PM.


#10 mjd420nova

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 10:27 AM

Training, well, to get hired with me you'd need some good training.  Basic electronics and electrical safety atop HS diploma will get an interview.  Our office supports 6 techs, each with a specialty but all skilled to handle any job.  Their backgrounds range from an MS in computers to a tech school grad.  Interviews are conducted by each tech alone with the applicant.  Naturally the new hires get the crappy jobs to start, sometimes just running parts from the office to the field.  Training on individual devices is sometimes provided by the manufacturer and they will have a guideline to follow as to who gets the training.  Hands on in the office or the lab  helps but like any battle plan, it only lasts about thirty seconds after first contact.  Safety is paramount, both environmental and electrical.  Many times we are called to do service in some hazardous areas of a clients operation.  Down manholes, on a roof top, clients offices, labs, homes and autos, the list has become open ended with new entries daily.   TOOLS, don't forget the tools needed to get into your suspect device.  Special tools abound but are often just expansion of available tools only longer or have a bend or different angle.  Tool kits can be reduced in size once the scope of the work is established.  That equipment that requires special test equipment for troubleshooting is usually kept with the kit of parts for those units.  That way when the tech kits the door to service a special unit, they take the parts kit along with the needed test gear.  Many warranty calls have the mfgr ship the parts to the user and they call us for an appointment when parts arrive, neat setup if the user and mfgr tech support diagnosed the fault correctly. 



#11 Trikein

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 08:59 PM

FYI my replay was in response to azisel saying "that's good if they train me first!". There is a LOT of bad technical support out there and the first step in fixing that is not being one. You can only be as good as your tools, training and passion to learn. 



#12 azisel

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 11:44 PM

Thank you guys! I will do my best to resolve issues lol! right now I'm still in the process of learning the products that I need to support (motherboard, graphics card, laptop/notebook, desktop barebone) Sometimes during my shift I get worried that I might not pass the 90 days probation but I try to be positive as much as I can  :smash:



#13 Trikein

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 12:30 AM

What is the nature of your support role? Are you going to be a Tier 1 for a hardware manufacture? IE Dell? Will you be dealing with field technicians or customers? 

 

If you are looking for some reading material, check out "A+ for dummies". The name is a bit rude but it's a good starting point. 






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