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Most Common Motherboard Issues and Fixes


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#1 azisel

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 10:23 PM

What are the most common motherboard issues/problems? and how to fix it? Thank you so much guys! I would really appreciate your help.



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#2 ScathEnfys

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 10:41 PM

In most cases, issues with the motherboard are not correctable. A new motherboard is the best way to fix a motherboard issue.
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#3 azisel

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 10:59 PM

In most cases, issues with the motherboard are not correctable. A new motherboard is the best way to fix a motherboard issue.

 

What about the time when you perform a clear cmos, when do you perform this?



#4 ScathEnfys

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 11:03 PM

That's what you perform if you believe you misconfigured BIOS settings.
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#5 ranchhand_

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 08:28 AM

ScathEnfys pretty much said it. Motherboards are strictly hardware. Aside from the drivers for the components, the board is created totally solid and all components are either directly integrated into the plastic or riveted on. There is nothing to replace. Sometimes the BIOS chip can be replaced by places that specialize in this, or if the capacitors go bad they can be re-soldered in, but that is about it. After the service charges it will amount to 50% (or even more!) of what a new board will cost .


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#6 ScathEnfys

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 06:14 PM

Yup. I didn't mention cap replacement because such a process requires specialized tools not found outside very specialized motherboard refurbishing centers.
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#7 azisel

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 06:47 PM

for the components like videocard, ram, hdd etc. How do you guys start the troubleshooting? And where to start?

Edited by azisel, 23 July 2016 - 06:50 PM.


#8 ScathEnfys

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 07:27 PM

With not having any clues? I would start by removing everything except the CPU, PSU, and motherboard. Then connect a case speaker and power button to the motherboard and turn it on. If all three components are working properly, there should be a long obnoxious beep from the motherboard - it's way of complaining about not having any RAM. If you don't hear the beep, it's a CPU/Mobo/PSU issue most likely. Then place one DIMM of RAM into the motherboard's preferred slot (or any slot if you don't know the preferred slot). If nothing changes or it changes for the worse, try a different slot. If all slots produce the same issue, then repeat the process with a different DIMM and recycle the first DIMM as it is toast. When you manage to get a POST without beeps, then add the videocard and other devices back one at a time until you find what device breaks the PC.

TL;DR version: Trial and error.
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#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 09:02 PM

Circuit board repair is not that simple anymore.  I have to use a free standing magnifier to do most of them.  Most common fault is a corroded CMOS battery holder that eats the traces off the board.  Small hookup wire can replace the damaged traces.  Bad capacitors are easy but because the leads are large the heat needed can damage the board and care needs to be taken not to move the leads until ALL solder is removed.  Failure to do so will lift the traces and cause more damage.   MOBO repairs to laptop boards are different as most common fault is a crushed corner from being dropped.  Again some small wire can help to patch the traces and remount any devices.  I use a 23 watt iron with a needle tip along with solder wick.  Solder suckers are great but the spring rebound from the Teflon tip on the board can damage traces.  Trouble shooting is as described, start with the bare elements and get it to work and then start with the added memory and option cards.  Once the hardware is happy, the software should be too. 






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