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Windows 10 won't start, unable to repair bcd of RAID0


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#1 BIOHAZARD_78

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 08:01 PM

I was working inside my PC to clean dirty fans.  While cleaning I accidentally disconnected one of the two hard drives in the RAID 0 volume that has the operating system.  Of course, Windows failed to load.  After fixing the connection problem the RAID controller recognizes the volume but Windows now fails with: 

 

"Your PC/Device needs to be repaired.

 

The Boot Configuration Data for your PC is missing or contains errors.

 

File:\Boot\BCD

 

Error code: 0xc000000f"

 

I've used the Windows Recovery Menu -> Troubleshoot -> Advanced Options -> Automatic repair and it failed.  

 

I've also gone to Advanced Options -> Command prompt and attempted to use bootrec.

bootrec /scanos identifies 0 Windows installations.    

 

/RebuildBcd, /fixMbr, and /fixboot do not work either.  

 

I suspect they are failing due to lack of a driver for the RAID controller. Am I correct in assuming that I have to slipstream/inject the RAID drivers into the installation media? 

 

I built the computer with the following components: 

MOTHERBOARD:  GIGABYTE GA-880GA-UD3H

CPU: AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition

HARD DRIVES:  OCZ Vertex 2 Solid State Drive

MEMORY: 16 GB G.SKILL RIPJAWS (4GB x 4) F3-1066CL9D-8GBRL

VIDEO: GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 970 4GB G1 GAMING OC EDITION

OS: Originally Windows 7 Ultimate, upgraded to Windows 10

 

 



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#2 RcNetman

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 10:56 AM

Delete or rename the BCD file: (if you have a BCD file do this)

ren BCD BCD.bak

Use bcdboot.exe to recreate BCD store:

bcdboot c:\Windows /l en-US /s b: /f ALL

The /f ALL parameter updates the BIOS settings including UEFI firmware/NVRAM, /l en-gb is to localise for UK/GB locale. The localization defaults to US English, or use en-US so the /l can be left off.

Reboot and cross your fingers.



#3 BIOHAZARD_78

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 05:45 PM

I am unable to access the volume that has the OS while at the command prompt.  

 

X:\>wmic logicaldisk get caption 

Caption

A:

X:

 

The volume is listed as functional by the RAID controller during boot.  

 

This reinforces my assumption that I need RAID drivers. 


Edited by BIOHAZARD_78, 22 July 2016 - 05:46 PM.


#4 usasma

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 04:49 AM

I'm not real good w/RAID, but I believe that you have to rebuild the RAID array first.

I'd suggest checking the instructions that came with the motherboard/RAID card (I can't help with this, as this is one of the reasons that I stopped using RAID a while back).

Good luck!


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#5 BIOHAZARD_78

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 09:28 PM

Nope, the RAID volume is OK.  The controller reports that it is fine.  The OS just doesn't know what to do with it. 



#6 usasma

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 04:53 AM

Maybe some of the links in the Google search will help?

https://www.google.com/search?q=fix+a+broken+raid+array&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

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#7 RcNetman

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 07:12 AM

Nope, the RAID volume is OK.  The controller reports that it is fine.  The OS just doesn't know what to do with it. 

You state that the OS doesn't know what to do with it(the statement is somewhat contradictory from your first post).. is it  that the OS boots or that the OS you are using doesn't (windows PE on a usb or cd)? If so you will need to point the boot to the OS. similar to fix MBR or under win 10. This may be jumping ahead but if you know your settings you may try this:

Ok so windows 8 or 10 are mostly using efi(or UEFI) boot with gpt "partitioned" drives. (as opposed to the old bios+MBR) this method does not have or use an "active partition" function as a part of the boot process. It uses the BCD a hidden partition. If you are weary in using Diskpart because of losing data remember this.. you more than likely have already lost the data on a SSD drive and if you had an active partition then it is not being found at the current moment by the OS.

BIOS v EFI (still often referred to as "uefi bios")
MBR v GPT

the first comment is a case of a GPT drive: (MBR drives can only contain 4 partitions)

partition 1 "system"(300MB) is an efi partition which is the first on the boot process and it contains the bootmgr and BCD files(windows boot program)
all other partitions except 4 and 6 are repair and recovery tools both built in to windows and added by the vendor.

from a "superuser" post:
I've spent a lot of time trying to get my Windows 8 PC to boot again after cloning to a new SSD and try to summarise how I finally got it all working -

Firstly, boot from a UEFI Windows 8 or 10 recovery disk (CD/DVD/USB)

Go into the Advanced options and run the Command Prompt.

Enter diskpart to use the DiskPart tool to ensure you have all the right partitions and to identify your EFI partition - the key thing here is that your EFI partition is formatted as FAT32:

DISKPART> sel disk 0

Disk 0 is now the selected disk.

DISKPART> list vol

Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
Volume 0 E DVD-ROM 0 B No Media
Volume 1 C NTFS Partition 195 GB Healthy Boot
Volume 2 WINRE NTFS Partition 400 MB Healthy Hidden
Volume 3 FAT32 Partition 260 MB Healthy System

Then assign a drive letter to the EFI partition:

DISKPART> sel vol 3 or whatever the FAT32 volume is.. if you don’t have at very least a C and hidden FAT32 partition, set it up and run recovery disk > run recovery from CD ROM drive  and come back to this.

Volume 3 is the selected volume.

DISKPART> assign letter=b:(or whatever is available and write it down which one you used)

DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point.

Exit DiskPart tool by entering exit and at the command prompt run the following:

cd /d b:\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\

bootrec /fixboot

This may or may not work at this point.

Delete or rename the BCD file: (if you have a BCD file do this)

ren BCD BCD.bak

Use bcdboot.exe to recreate BCD store:

bcdboot c:\Windows /l en-US /s b: /f ALL

The /f ALL parameter updates the BIOS settings including UEFI firmware/NVRAM, /l en-gb is to localize for UK/GB locale. The localization defaults to US English, or use en-US so the /l can be left off.

Reboot and cross your fingers.

This update is what makes UEFI work with windows.

 

Good luck.. not sure if this will help but if your issue isn't solved it's a shot.



#8 BIOHAZARD_78

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 12:58 PM

It looks like this was all caused by a faulty connector on a SATA cable.  I replaced the faulty cable and rebooted and got the same error as in the original post.  The system automatically repaired itself on the subsequent reboot. 
 
Thank you all for your input. 
 
That's the short answer.  Continue reading for the long version: 
 
I decided to set aside the hard drives with the nonfunctional installation of Windows 10 and start from scratch with a pair of new drives so I could at least use the computer.  
 
I configured the new drives for RAID0, using the same SATA cables as before.  To complete the installation of Windows 7 I had to locate AMD SATA RAID drivers and copy them to a USB drive

AMD SATA RAID Driver (Preinstall driver, press F6 during Windows* setup to read from floppy)
 

 

 

 
After installation of Windows 7 the computer would occasionally halt during boot and the RAID controller would show that one of the drives was missing.  Looking at the cables more closely I saw that one of the SATA cables would not stay firmly seated in the SATA port on the motherboard.  I swapped out the cable and the RAID problem stopped occurring.  
 
I returned the original drives to the system and Windows 10 was able to repair itself. 





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