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2 Devices Connect, 2 Don't


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#1 Adrian B.

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Posted 21 July 2016 - 10:11 AM

Hello Everyone,

 

My roommate and I recently installed WiFi in our apartment, but since the beginning 3 devices have consistently been able to connect and 2 have consistently not been able to connect. 

-----

 

DEVICES

 

Connecting:

 

-My Lenovo Thinkpad

-Roommate's HP 2000 Notebook PC

-Roommate's HP Compaq desktop

 

Not Connecting:

 

-My HP Pavillion laptop

-My Dell Precision desktop

 

All devices are running versions of Windows.

 

 

SYMPTOMS

 

On the HP Pavillion laptop (Windows 7), when I enter the password to connect to Wifi, I just get the message, "Could not connect to [network name]." This message seems to pop up too quickly, as if the computer didn't really have to think before rejecting the attempt. It seems like it took even less time than when you simply enter a wrong WiFi password on any given computer, which leads me to think that the HP didn't really try to establish the connection.

 

On the Dell Precision desktop (Windows 10), the problem is stranger: I have apparently connected to the network, but I still have no internet access; so when I look at the network in the queue, it says "Secured, no internet."

 

Also, I repeat that the problem is consistent, not sporadic. All devices consistently either work or don't.

 

 

POTENTIAL CAUSES

 

1. Signal strength: Definitely not--it is strong throughout the apartment.

2. Versions of Windows: Probably not. My non-connecting laptop and desktop are running different versions, and my connecting laptop is running the same version as the non-connecting desktop. 

 

I did just a little bit of searching for similar problems. Here are some potential causes that I have found which may or may not have anything to do with my problem:

 

3. Modem channel needs to be changed.

4. Devices' security settings are blocking wireless signal

 

 

-----

I apologize that I'm not totally sure what information would be useful, as I am a bit of a noob.

 

Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

Thank you,

AB


Edited by Adrian B., 21 July 2016 - 10:13 AM.

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#2 Adrian B.

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 09:28 AM

UPDATE:

 

Router channel: I read a bit on WiFi interference. As I said, it's not an issue of the internet's being slow, timing out, etc.--the devices simply aren't connecting, or being able to access the internet (remember that the desktop apparently registers a connection, but says there's no internet access), at all. So I don't think switching the router channel is likely to do anything.

 

Pinging: I also tried pinging the router. On both the desktop and the laptop, I received the same result: four lines of "transmit failure. general failure." Not even timeout. No half-assed attempt, no middling percentage of info loss, just 100% loss.

 

I did take a look at ipconfig as well. On the desktop everything seemed in order: I got the IPv4 and Default Gateway (the IPs for the computer itself and the router), as well as the IP of the Subnet Mask and the IPv6. 

 

On the other hand, on the laptop all connections yield "Media disconnected," including Wireless LAN. Under the wireless grouping, it also shows the "Connection-specific DNS Suffix" as one of the last wireless connections (I'm pretty sure THE last) that I connected to: "starvedrocklodge.com."

 

Troubleshooter: On the desktop, the general Windows Troubleshooter was no help until I specifically diagnosed the wireless connection I want to use. The Troubleshooter then yielded: "Your computer appears to be correctly configured, but the device or resource (DNS server) is not responding"--which makes SOOO much sense because other devices are connecting just fine. (Sarcasm.) On the laptop, troubleshooting gives me, "None of the networks you have previously connected to are in range."


Edited by Adrian B., 24 July 2016 - 09:57 AM.

A. B.

#3 Trikein

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Posted 25 July 2016 - 08:37 AM

What do you have your wireless settings set to? Also what model number router or gateway? Also, can you get online with those devices wired?



#4 Adrian B.

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 08:10 AM

Hey, thanks for helping me out! 

 

I'm sorry, you'll have to translate "wireless settings" for me. Do you mean Hz and things like that? The router is an Arris DG 860. I have successfully connected the laptop using ethernet, although I have not tried with the desktop.


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#5 sweedishfish

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 04:37 PM

Alright first things first,

 

 

Troubleshooter: On the desktop, the general Windows Troubleshooter was no help until I specifically diagnosed the wireless connection I want to use. The Troubleshooter then yielded: "Your computer appears to be correctly configured, but the device or resource (DNS server) is not responding"--which makes SOOO much sense because other devices are connecting just fine. (Sarcasm.) On the laptop, troubleshooting gives me, "None of the networks you have previously connected to are in range."

 

Please go thru your network settings and make sure its obtaining DNS automatically.

 

Also, this could be a simple driver issue so lets have you go to HP and Dell's website to check for driver updates. Once that's done, try connecting the laptops to your network. If it works, great, your done!!! BUT lets say it didn't work, then its either the firmware is outdated (which I doubt it, but you never know) or those laptops have bad wireless cards. If they have bad wireless cards, you'll need to upgrade them regardless.



#6 Adrian B.

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:34 AM

Sweedishfish: Thanks for your reply

 

I looked up the network settings and it all appears to be in order for both devices. 

 

I did not get around to checking the drivers for the Dell (it's heavy so I'm too lazy to move it to the ethernet cord, and I don't have a USB drive with me at the moment), but I did just install three updates for the HP. Nothing's changed.


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#7 Adrian B.

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:44 AM

I just tried to download and install the drivers for the Dell desktop. It was a mess. The installations didn't work because I didn't have this one SNMP service thing and because the drivers weren't appropriate for the version of Windows or something. 

 

What I don't get is, how the hell am I supposed to know what drivers to install when the most recent network-related update on their site is from 2014? I have a used machine that I just bought second-hand without a hard drive, and I had a hard drive and Windows 10 installed on it.


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