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how to get a job as IT technican


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#1 fozzer2016

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:17 PM

hi  so i want to get a job in IT. i have always wanted to work in IT, i would like to work as an IT technician. i currently have no experience in the field and am at a loss of where to start. do i go for certifcations, if so which one there are so many and heard various reviews on you should get it or no you should not get. i have IT qualifications from college. I am 23 years old

 

i have built my own computer and tinkered about with computers 

 

anyway i would like to know what path should i take someone new tot the industry to get my foot in the door.



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#2 Viper_Security

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:37 PM

Ask friends to fix their computers, BEFORE you apply anywhere, some places will have on the job training (which baffles me because IT technicians are already supposed to know )

 

the place i work at did not want me to have any certifications, they wanted to know if i could apply my knowledge in the real world (eg, they broke a computer in several places (hardware and software) and i had to repair it with very little details about the machine (get used to that)).

 

Yes i did get frustrated and i guarantee you will as well (ask almost any IT Tech/ IT Consultant happens a lot)

 

but eventually i fixed it, and then several more ( about 15 more with different issues) before they even considered me.

 

 

Some people say to get an A+ cert. which with today's technology might be moot.

 

 

I'd also get educated in power (circuits, diodes, capacitors, etc.)

 

 

I would recommend a degree but they only teach certain things pertaining to the specific degree, almost every one of our customers said they preferred someone that had experience (18 years and counting for me) over someone who had a cert. because they felt like i could give them other options to repair a device.

 

and most of all, be HONEST, even if it makes you sound bad they customer would much rather have you be honest.

 

if i cant fix anything there is no charge and i recommend someone that might be able too.

 

 

 

Synopsis: Ask your friends if you can fix their machines to get more experience  (ALWAYS make a backup before you attempt repairs)

 

talk to your LOCAL computer store owners/employees ( please don't ask people like the geek squad, they only know certain things and your local store will most likely know more 9/10 times)

 

(((Will add more if i think of anything atm, got a few customers heading in atm)))


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#3 TsVk!

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 05:47 PM

I got into it by getting an IT diploma (part time whilst still working), then within 6 weeks of having the diploma I had a job. Seems that the market isn't so kind over there to new techies. The best approach might be to keep applying for every job you can find. Read the web/paper/noticeboards anywhere you find tech jobs in your area and apply for everything, even if you aren't quite qualified enough for the job. You'll get good experience with interviews then which will be important for landing a good job.

 

I had to start close to the bottom, but I just kept on getting more certificates and making myself more important to my company. 3 years later I'm on a respectable wage and their looking at promoting me to a more senior position now.

 

The reality is that if you choose a serious career in IT you can NEVER stop studying too. Technology is changing and morphing around us quicker than we can ever learn. Every day we spend doing this we know proportionately less than we did the day before. 

 

The other thing to consider is Linux. Sure you want to start with Windows tech and being a pro with Windows is important for Linux sysadmins, but working in Linux is one of the easiest/best ways for tech minded people to earn a doctors wage without having to look at icky stuff all day. Get yourself a Linux install and start learning, being proficient on Linux looks great on any CV too.



#4 bharvey1107

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 07:00 AM

i would also like to get more information this as its an industry/career i am looking to get into 

 

although getting on at 30yrs i have no clue where to start

 

i am thinking of going down the degree certification route as i already fix numerous frinds and family PC/laptop and tablets



#5 TsVk!

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 04:19 PM

I was 30 when I started too, my last career was as a sound engineer.



#6 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 11:13 PM

I was 35 when i got my Diploma at TAFE. never to old to start mate.

The thing is, i would see teachers interview the parents kids and the parents always said "Ohhhhhh he is brilliant with computers he is on them all the time" when in actual fact the kid was just playing Dota 2 or WoW all day long and didnt know what an IP Subnet was or what a packet looks like when you use a packet sniffer or how to diagnose an issue by using the tools built in to Windows.

Dont even get me started on fixing an issue or server administration.



#7 Viper_Security

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:14 AM

I was 35 when i got my Diploma at TAFE. never to old to start mate.

The thing is, i would see teachers interview the parents kids and the parents always said "Ohhhhhh he is brilliant with computers he is on them all the time" when in actual fact the kid was just playing Dota 2 or WoW all day long and didnt know what an IP Subnet was or what a packet looks like when you use a packet sniffer or how to diagnose an issue by using the tools built in to Windows.

Dont even get me started on fixing an issue or server administration.

i Know EXACTLY what you mean, wait till they lose the internet, all hell breaks loose, lmao


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#8 Kilroy

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:24 PM

I'd suggest looking on Dice, Monster, and Indeed to see what employers are looking for in your area.  Then you will know what you need to do.

 

Normally they are looking for three things, degree, certification, and experience.  Normally you can get a job with two of the three.  If you have all three your chances are greatly improved.

 

Normally I recommend getting CompTIA A+ and Network+ certifications.  These are both very basic certifications that will give you a strong foundation to build on and a good idea of how all of the pieces fit together.



#9 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:23 PM

basically what Kilroy says, also when i was studying and started Cisco. I loved routers way more than server administration. But then i thought, wow once you learn routers and to a lesser extent cisco's way of configurating routers i then got a little bored and also seen there was not a big demand for network engineering jobs unless you lived near a  data center or capital city.

I then started learning more about server administration and hardware, scripting is always handy to learn as well.



#10 bharvey1107

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 01:32 AM

Thanks for the info Kilroy i think i will give it a go, its just the "Where do i even start" phase that is troubling me one i have that im sure i will have no problem getting stuck in

I'd suggest looking on Dice, Monster, and Indeed to see what employers are looking for in your area.  Then you will know what you need to do.

 

Normally they are looking for three things, degree, certification, and experience.  Normally you can get a job with two of the three.  If you have all three your chances are greatly improved.

 

Normally I recommend getting CompTIA A+ and Network+ certifications.  These are both very basic certifications that will give you a strong foundation to build on and a good idea of how all of the pieces fit together.



#11 bharvey1107

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 01:34 AM

I was 35 when i got my Diploma at TAFE. never to old to start mate.

The thing is, i would see teachers interview the parents kids and the parents always said "Ohhhhhh he is brilliant with computers he is on them all the time" when in actual fact the kid was just playing Dota 2 or WoW all day long and didnt know what an IP Subnet was or what a packet looks like when you use a packet sniffer or how to diagnose an issue by using the tools built in to Windows.

Dont even get me started on fixing an issue or server administration.

Thanks for the reply i also know what you mean or the fact that they are brilliant with computers because he/she rapid at typing all because of an addiction to social media lmao



#12 Houdini5150

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 12:18 AM

Look into A+ as a start. Apply to entry level desktop support where you just deploy pc and it take them apart. Some places I've seen online, recycle pcs.

#13 Zone_86

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 04:11 AM

You will hear a lot of things on the net about this. What i can tell you is that you should get at least a few certifications like your A+, Net+ and then make contacts and show your skills.


Edited by Zone_86, 23 February 2017 - 04:12 AM.


#14 TsVk!

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 04:20 AM

Besides all of these things...

 

Interview skills are the skills that will get you the job. Sadly not IT qualifications.



#15 Kilroy

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 02:22 PM

Without the IT qualifications, you will never get to the interview.  I'm sure my resume goes into the can for all jobs that require a college degree.  Forget that I've been doing the job for over two decades in a variety of institutions (banking, manufacturing, medical, research and development) and even if I had a degree it would be from the 80s.


Edited by Kilroy, 23 February 2017 - 02:23 PM.





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