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looking for uninterrupted power supplies ups


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6 replies to this topic

#1 yunion

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 06:35 PM

so im wanting protection against power cuts and i heard that ups can do that and this might seem like a ridiculous question but can a 200 watt ups protect a 1000 watt computer form power cuts i ask this because ups seem really expensive and i wish there was a cheaper alternative to protect a computer from power cuts


Edited by yunion, 11 July 2016 - 06:38 PM.


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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 08:18 PM

The determining factor in figuring the size of a UPS is how long you want it to run.  If you're just looking for protection from surges and dropouts, a 200 watt unit will work but not for long.  Units are sold by WATT/HOUR ratings.  So a 200 watt unit would run 1000 watts for around 12 minutes.



#3 yunion

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 09:25 PM

i dont care how long it runs just as long as it protects a 1000 watt computer from power cuts


Edited by yunion, 11 July 2016 - 10:19 PM.


#4 yunion

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:37 AM

im having a hard time finding a good ups for a 1000 watt computer im looking all over but i dont understand how it works do i look for the wattage or the va like if i have 1500 va and 300 watts in that good enough for a 1000 watt computer?


Edited by yunion, 14 July 2016 - 06:38 AM.


#5 smax013

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 08:05 AM

First, what you do mean by a 1000 watt computer? Do you mean a desktop with a 1000 watt power supply, but you have not measured actually power draw (in watts) of the computer? Or do you mean a desktop computer where you have measured the actual power draw in watts and it is 1000 watts?

I ask because desktop computers frequently have power supplies that have watt ratings that are significantly higher than what the hardware will actually draw.

If you KNOW that the computer is drawing 1000 watts, then you can use any number of UPS selectors to enter in that wattage and get a recommendation. For example, here is APC's selector (this is the brand I tend to use for my UPS devices):

http://www.apc.com/us/en/tools/ups_selector/US/en/server/load

That selector will recommend this if you input 1000 watts:

http://www.apc.com/us/en/tools/ups_selector/US/en/server/load

It should run about 7 minutes under that load according to that selector, but costs $560.

If you are talking about a desktop with a 1000 watt power supply, then you need to get some sort of measurement of the actual power draw in watts. The best way to do this would be to get a device that will measure the power draw such as a Kill A Watt (https://www.amazon.com/P3-International-P4460-Electricity-Monitor/dp/B000RGF29Q) and then run the computer doing the most power intensive thing (for example, if you game, then run a game) and see how many watts it draws. If you don't want to go that route, then you can estimate you watt draw by using a power supply calculator. You can find one here at NewEgg, but there are many others out there:

http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell/tool/psucalc/index.html?name=Power-Supply-Wattage-Calculator

Enter in the specs of your computer (CPU, graphics card, etc) and see what power supply it recommends. And even then, keep in mind that most selectors will "pad" their recommendation to leave you some headroom for other stuff you might have forgotten to include and safety factor (I believe it is generally recommended to not get a power supply that exactly meets your power requirements, but leave some room for a number of reasons).

You will find that unless you are running a desktop with two powerful GPU cards, you will likely be no where near a recommendation for a 1000 watt power supply.

#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 05:48 PM

 

do i look for the wattage or the va like if i have 1500 va and 300 watts

 

There may be some confusion about measurement units here. From Ohm's Law (!)  Watts (W) = Volts (V) x Amps (A) ,  so,

 

1500va = 1500W (Watts), and  300W = 300va

 

As Smax has pointed out it is highly unlikely that your system is drawing anything like 1000W continuously and, in any case, the purpose of a UPS is not to run your computer indefinitely. You use a UPS to protect against power surges and to allow you time to shut down properly and safely in the event of a power cut. So the 200W version mentioned above would be adequate for this purpose as it would keep your computer running for about 10 to 15 minutes.

 

The type of UPS used in server farms, hospitals and so on are designed only to keep the equipment running until the back up power supply - usually a diesel generator or similar - cuts in. You are not going to get a standby generator inside your budget !

 

Power surges are a different matter. These come in two types, the routine noise on the public electricity supply and extreme events like lightning strikes on the power system. The amounnt of  'noise' on the public supply can be surprising. Essentially this is voltage signals taking the supply above, or below, its nominal voltage of either 240 or 110 volts (depending on where you live). Its intensity also varies very much on where you are connected to on the public supply, some locations are much noisier than others. The PSU in your computer will smooth out nearly all of what might be considered routine levels of surge. If you have surges sufficient to make the lights flicker on a regular basis then you may well need a UPS. For really powerful surges such as lightning strikes, a UPS may or may not be sufficient. If you live in an area subject to frequent and violent electrical storms then the best thing to do is to shut down the computer and disconnect it from the supply when these are in your area. Happiily, where I live is not subject to such storms !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 06:59 PM

I have a rather elaborate arrangement with UPS units and surge suppressors.  I use a small 750 VA unit for the desktop, just the computer and monitor, it only runs for about 20 minutes, time enough to conduct an orderly shutdown.  The home security system runs on battery power and an inverter,  backed up with solar panels to keep the batteries charged.  Some lamps circuits are also 110 volt DC and independent from other power.  They only come on in the event of an outage and will run for almost a week without a charge in the ten lead acid cells for the source.  Surge suppressors are a one shot deal, once "struck" by an event, they will stop surges at the cost of burning themselves out.  The most important part of all is grounding.  UPS and surge suppressors need a very good ground, any events will be shunted to ground so it doesn't do much good if it isn't grounded properly.  Don't trust the outlets, run a separate wire to a cold water pipe or adequate ground stake.






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