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Why does reseating graphics card fix problem?


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#1 JAFL

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 07:36 PM

I'm really hoping someone can give me some insight on a recent computer problem I had, which may or may not be resolved:

 

I have a 6-month old Lenovo desktop with a factory installed Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 graphics card.   Everything has been working fine for the six months I've had the computer.  Recently, after entering sleep mode, my monitor failed to come out of energy saving mode because, as it's error message said, it wasn't receiving power from the video card.  I went through a myriad of things to try to fix the problem such as restarting the computer, checking all the connections, doing a hard boot, etc. but nothing worked.  I hooked up a different monitor to the computer and verified it wasn't the monitor that had the problem, it was something going on with the computer.  So after a couple of calls with Lenovo tech support I was ready to mail it in and have them resolve it, which I was reluctant to do as it's a risk that something could get damaged in transport.   I did however, do a lot of research online to this particular problem, and one thing that kept coming up was to reseat the graphics card.  

 

So sure enough, as a last ditch effort, I tried this and it worked.  So, my question for those in the know, is why does reseating a graphics card solve a problem like this?  And is it really solved, or could there be a bigger problem going on with the mother board?  I really don't want to send in the computer if I don't have to, and so far, it's working normal again.  

 

Is there any particular reason that 'reseating' the card works? Does this have something to do with dust, static electricity? Makes no sense to me as my computer is very well protected and never gets bumped.  I've never opened the desktop until today.  The card is very well secured, so it's not as though it's come lose or anything.  

 

Thanks in advance for any insight on this.



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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 07:57 PM

Maybe the factory did not fully seat the card; and you fully seated the card?


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#3 JAFL

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 08:22 PM

Maybe the factory did not fully seat the card; and you fully seated the card?

Perhaps, but it worked fine for six months.  And the card appeared to be fully seated in its slot.  I had to depress the clip to get it out, as well unscrew a support bar over the top of the card.  Just seems odd to me that a computer that never moves, is never bumped, works great....would all of a sudden need its graphics card reseated.



#4 TsVk!

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 08:39 PM

During normal use the board heats up and expands. When you shut down your machine it contracts and causes some oxidization on the contacts. This can build up over time and cause a poor circuit, particularly if the card wasn't spotlessly clean or very tight when it was first installed. It's pretty common. With RAM too.



#5 RolandJS

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 09:06 PM

Tsvk, you're right as rain!  I totally forgot that what you posted happens day in, day out.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 01:52 PM

I can't count the hundreds of man hours spent unplugging and reseating mainframe boards in the later 60's.  Heating and cooling cycles will make boards grow and shrink, moving around on its mounts.  Contacts are mostly just pressure type and oxidation will occur.  Remounting the boards allowed some oxidation to be rubbed off and a clean mating surface is achieved.


Edited by mjd420nova, 11 July 2016 - 01:52 PM.





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