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Backup specific file types


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#1 Richardf77

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 07:34 AM

I want to be able to backup by specific file type rather than by folder. I used to have a portable hard drive with software that did this automatically, but it no longer works so I am looking for other options. I know I can backup folders which if it contains only files of a certain type is fine, but files of certain types are never just in one place! Most folders are of mixed type.

So what I need is software that (is ideally free) and will search for say jpegs automatically and back them up. I have AOMEI Backupper free but I don't think it does this. I don't like/use Windows Backup.

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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 08:27 AM

You probably have to go with a pay-for backup/restore program; I like your idea, I never thought of that before!  If I run across such a program, you bet I'll post it and may even begin trying it myself.  To help me search in a cross-reference fashion, what is the exact name, source, version number of what used to work for you?


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 08:29 AM

I have not used Aomei for this situation but if you select C:\ or C:\USERS for folder backup,check include subfolders, then add your file inclusion masks would this do what you are asking? I am not sure if selecting only C:\  would work or not.

 

Edit: I just ran Aomei and I can confirm you are able to backup any file extension on the whole Windows partition using C:\ as the target with include subfolders checked. It ran the backup and placed all files into one image file I was able to explore. I have not tried doing incremental or differential backups on this backup.


Edited by JohnC_21, 10 July 2016 - 09:37 AM.


#4 kaljukass

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 08:40 AM

But why do you want to complex and paid solutions if you can use Windows itself, namely the command line work.
Simply write one smal .cmd or .bat file and everything is done with one click or if you want can  also make it automatically, simply set up scheduled tasks and everything is done.


#5 Richardf77

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 11:02 AM

Thanks for replies.

1. The 'old system' was a Polaroid Media Backup portable hard drive, had for years but stopped backing up when I upgraded to W10. I think I created a thread on it somewhere.

2. Are we talking about the same AOMEI software? With the one I have you either do all user files or specify specific folders to create a bespoke backup. Can't see how to select or deselect folders (like with windows backup).

3. Sorry I need something ready made. Don't get on with command propmt/DOS programming

Any other backup freeware that might do better? Wouldn't be sorry, not 100% happy with AOMEI

#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 11:14 AM

Yes, I was using Aomei. I guess you can say I was doing all user files. I put the whole C:\ partition as a target and backed up all jpg files on the C:\ partition. Are you trying to backup from specific folders or the whole hard drive? Are you trying to deselect subfolders within folders?



#7 Richardf77

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 02:37 PM

Been doing some more searching. Found EaseUSTodu (whatever). Free version seems to do what I want, takes a bit of working out and I didn't get it quite right first time. Viewing the backed up files is different to say the least but looks good so far. It will do the job until a permanent solution is found or I can get the old backup drive working again.

#8 RolandJS

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 06:52 PM

Richard, are you planning to also do incremental or differential backups?  I never have, so I'll be learning alongside with you.  If you're only doing one-pass, consider doing that process twice onto two different save-folders on your external HD; better safe than sorry.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 Richardf77

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 11:07 AM

Yes I probably will after I add more photos. Never sure which is best though, incremental or differential. Have tended towards incremental in the past.

#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 12:03 PM

Just remember, if one of the incremental chains is broken such as a corrupt image, you lose everything. Differential is safer but uses more hard drive space.


Edited by JohnC_21, 11 July 2016 - 12:03 PM.


#11 Stafeegraph

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 03:36 AM

Windows 10 includes two different backup programs: File History and Windows Backup and Restore. The File History tool automatically saves multiple versions of a given file, so you can “go back in time” and restore a file before it was changed or deleted. That’s useful for files that change frequently, like Word documents or PowerPoint presentations. The Backup and Restore tool, on the other hand, creates a single backup of the latest version of your files on a schedule. It can also create a “system image,” which is a snapshot of your entire system—operating system, programs, documents, and all—which makes it easy to restore everything if something terrible happens.

You could use one or the other, but for a more comprehensive backup strategy, use both. These backups will be your first line of defense in case something catastrophic happens to your computer, like a hard drive failure, a malware infection, or someone accidentally deleting something important. Of course,you still need offsite backup. We recommend CrashPlan, which can be configured for online backups or remote backups to another computer. However, recovering your files from a local backup will be much quicker—and, with the system image, you can get your entire computer back almost immediately to exactly the way it was before a system crash.

Why You Should Always Have More Than One Backup

Your data really isn't safe unless you're backing up properly and with lots of…Read more

Without further ado, let’s get started. You’ll need an external hard drive, a NAS (network attached storage), or another computer on your local network to serve as your backup location.

Use File History to Back Up Specific Files and Folders That Change Often

We looked at File History when it came out with Windows 8, but Windows 10 adds a new interface and some important improvements, such as being able to choose specific folders to back up. By default, File History backs up all the folders in your user account folder (C:/Users/[accountname]). These include your desktop, documents, downloads, music, pictures, and a few other folders. It will also back up your OneDrive folders. Most importantly, File History monitors these folders for changes, and automatically backs up any files that have been added or modified, similar to OS X’s Time Machine.

How to Set Up and Enable File History

  1. Click the Windows button and start typing in “File History.” The menu should bring up “File History settings” automatically; click to open it.
  2. Go to Backup and click “Add a drive.”
  3. Select the drive or network location you want to use for File History’s backups.iilfz8ej9uojiyzzmuih.PNG
  4. Now click “More options.”
    Here you can start a backup, change when your files are backed up, select how long to keep backed up files, add or exclude a folder, or switch File History to a different drive.ldqxvu3lbbqt0laxtqfc.PNG

 

  1. Click the “Back up now” button to start your first File History backup.

One option you might want to change in the settings, depending on your preferences, is how long File History’s backups are kept:

  • The default is “Forever,” which means File History will keep making and saving backups until your drive is full. At that point, you’d have to either use a different drive or manually start a cleanup from the Control Panel (under System and Security > File History > Advanced Settings) to make space.
  • If you switch to “Until space is needed,” File History will automatically remove the oldest versions of the files it backs up when space gets low on your backup drive.
  • If you switch to one of the other timeframes, like 1 month or 2 years, File History will delete the oldest versions when files reach that time setting.

That’s all there is to it. File History will work quietly in the background going forward.

How to Restore from File History Backups

To restore individual files or folders or to get an old version of a file back, go to Control Panel > File History and click the “Restore personal files” link in the left menu. You’ll be able to browse by backup date and even preview files before you hit the big green button to restore the file to its previous location.dfzt9mmhutvxdpbdsnzl.JPG

 

 

 

You can also restore previous versions of a file without having to open the File History restore tool. Right-click on the file, select Properties, and go to the Previous Versions tab.

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Handy! But, again, you have to have this feature turned on for it to be useful.

Use Backup and Restore to Make Complete System Images

You may remember Backup and Restore from earlier versions of Windows. In Windows 10, the feature is actually called “Backup and Restore (Windows 7)“ so you’ll know it’s the older tool. Even if you have File History turned on, it’s a good idea to also use Backup and Restore to create a system image periodically on a different drive. Besides getting you quickly back up and running if something happens like a boot drive failure, you could use a system image to upgrade to a new drive and get back to work without reinstalling everything and losing your settings.

Use a different drive than the one you use for File History to add redundancy to your backup system. Remember: When it comes to backups, redundancy is king.

How to Set Up and Enable Backup and Restore

1.       Open Backup and Restore. It’s in the Control Panel rather than Windows 10's Settings, but again, you can click the Windows button and then type in “backup and restore” to find the tool.

  1. Click “Set up backup
  2. x0ecj4ls5krccvyp849k.PNG

 

  1. Select your backup drive. Or, alternatively, click on the “Save on a network” button to choose a network share. 

eu6sezr1smcrkqrnw4qr.PNG
 

 

  1. Next, choose whether you want Windows to select what to back up or if you want to select the folders yourself. If you let Windows choose, it will save the files on your desktop, in your user folder, and in your libraries as well as create a system image.cvq67yeenenib4jlt8ds.PNG

 

The easiest solution is to let Windows choose. However, if you’re concerned about space or want to tweak which folders are included, select “Let me choose.” Then you can deselect the Libraries, which would already be backed up with File History, and have the tool only create system images on the drive.

  1. Click the “Save settings and run backup” button to run your first backup.ewxarugdkuehn22yogqn.PNG

 

The best part? After your first backup, this will be done automatically on a schedule (Sunday at 7pm, by default).

How to Restore a System Image

To restore Windows from a system image, head to Settings > Update & Security > Recovery and restart your computer in the advanced startup mode. From there, you should be able to navigate to and select the system image you want to restore from.

If you just want to restore certain folders or files from your backup, head back to the Control Panel > System and Security > Backup and Restore (Windows 7) screen and click the “Restore my files” button.

If your computer isn’t working and you can’t get to either the Control Panel or Settings, you can start your computer using a Windows installation disc or USB drive, a system repair disc, or a bootable USB recovery drive, and use the restore tools on that disc to recover from a Windows system image. This WinHelp article describes the difference between a recovery drive (which is new in Windows 10) and a repair disk, as well as how to create one.

File History and Backup and Restore aren’t the most robust backup and recovery tools you can use, but they’re simple, free, and built into Windows already. Supplement them with an online backup service like Crashplan or Backblaze, and you have your 3-2-1 backup needs covered.



#12 Richardf77

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 11:16 AM

Thanks for the info. I will look into it at some point.

Quite pleased with EaseUSTodu backup. Seems easy to use and is quicker than some others. Having run my initial full backup of picture files, had to make some changes to one of the directories containing photos so after I had made them I ran a differential backup which quickly and easily updated the backup. The old folder structure is still in the backup and I am not yet sure if I can remove what idon't want backed up any more without scrapping the backup and running it again in full. It's not that big a backup (about 40gb on a part full 500GB external drive) so I will probably leave it alone until it really needs running in full again.q

#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 12:19 PM

I can see where picking files and folders in Aomei  is kind of a kludge compared to Easeus. I wished Aomei moved to the same method of picking folder and files.



#14 smax013

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 07:39 AM

1. The 'old system' was a Polaroid Media Backup portable hard drive, had for years but stopped backing up when I upgraded to W10. I think I created a thread on it somewhere.


Yes, you did.

If it helps anyone, here is the thread on the Polaroid Media Backup portable drive that the original poster also created:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/617586/polaroid-media-backup-v2-windows-10-issues/#entry4023264




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