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Checking File System on C: The type of the file system is NTFS


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#1 bgregory

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Posted 09 July 2016 - 10:28 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

Randomly, my lap top running Windows Vista, on boot  up started saying "Checking file system on C: The type of the files system is NTFS. Volume label is S3A6688D007". It then advises me to allow a disk check for consistency. It runs through the check, deletes a bunch of files and then recovers and restarts. Once Windows boots I usually either cannot click on any icons in the tool bar or desk top and a lot of times I loose any mouse or keyboard response, resulting in having to shut down via the power button. I have ran through the process multiple times over the last few weeks and am making no head way what so ever. Can anyone offer me some advise as to what I should do to fix this issue? Thanks!



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 05:55 PM

It sounds like you have some corruption in some of your Windows files. As a first step run SFC then Chkdsk.

 

To run SFC click 'Start - All programs - Accessories' then RIGHT click on 'Command prompt' and select 'Run as administrator from the pop-up menu that appears. You will get a black window with white text and a blinking underscore at the end of the text. Then type 'sfc /scannow' (without the ' ', and note the space between 'sfc' and '/scannow') then press the enter key. The system will now scan for corrupted files and attempt to repair them. Let it run until it has finished - this can take up to an hour depending on your system - then re-boot and see if you still have the problem.

 

If you do, run 'chkdsk /r'. Start off exactly as above but type 'chkdsk /r' at the prompt (again, no ' ' and note the space before the '/'). You will get a message saying it cannot run but will at next boot. Re-boot the computer and let it run. Yes, this is very similar to what your computer is doing at the moment but the '/r' instructs the computer to try to repair any problems. When it finishes it will probably re-boot, if it doesn't, re-boot anyway.

 

Hopefully this will fix the problem. If it doesn't post back.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 bgregory

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for the response. My main issue is that once Windows loads it pretty much freezes instantly. Sometimes I can move the mouse around before it does, but I can't actually open anything.

#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 07:35 PM

You should check your hard drive and memory. You can do this with UBCD. Burn the iso to disk. At the main menu there is HDD(/HDD/Diagnosis). In the submenus you will find Seatools for DOS. Run the short and long tests. If your disk is not detected reboot UBCD and select Parted Magic from the menu. On the desktop is an icon called Disk Health or GsmartControl. Click on this and run the short/long tests.

 

If the tests pass then run Memtest86+ for at least 6 passes and preferably overnight.



#5 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 06:51 PM

As I said in my post, it was very much a first step. Try John_C's suggestion next for two reasons. First, he usually knows what he is talking about, and second, I would have headed you in much the same direction.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#6 bgregory

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 07:58 PM

Thanks guys! I will give this a try and let you know how I make out. Am I correct in assuming once I have this burnt to a disk I run it from the boot menu on the affected laptop?

#7 FreeBooter

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 09:19 PM

I suggest you first execute chkdsk  C: /r command from Command Prompt as a administrator as HDD is the causing the issue not memory the C: partition file system damage there may be bad sectors so repair them by executing Chkdsk command.



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