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Macrium Reflect recovery question


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#1 bromberg

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 12:06 AM

   I just created a PE Rescue CD and imaged my PC by using Macrium Reflect (v6).

   When it comes time to recover my PC and my data, if I use the Macrium PE Rescue CD disk will I need a 2nd CD drive (containing my Macrium image of my OS & data) so the restore can occur, or will I be given an opportunity to insert my 'image CD' after my PC reads the PE disk?

   BTW, it seems that Macrium only allows paying members to ask questions at their forum - is that correct?

Dan


Edited by hamluis, 03 July 2016 - 02:27 PM.
Moved from IH to Imaging, etc. - Hamluis.


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#2 Platypus

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 03:36 AM

Once you boot from the rescue disc into the recovery environment, that disc is no longer active and the recovery environment is live in RAM. The drive will be available to read data discs. But are you under the impression you have imaged your hard drive contents onto CD? When you say "image CD" do you mean a single CD?
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#3 bromberg

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:33 AM

Once you boot from the rescue disc into the recovery environment, that disc is no longer active and the recovery environment is live in RAM. The drive will be available to read data discs. But are you under the impression you have imaged your hard drive contents onto CD? When you say "image CD" do you mean a single CD?

Platypus:

 

Great point! I'll have to create a partition on my external HDD to contain the image created by Macrium since no way will a DVD have enough space.

 

A quick followup question:  Macrium Reflect allowed me to write to a target partition I had created for it on an external HDD (when I used their "image" option). However, when I used their "clone" option I could not specify the partition I wanted Macrium to write to.  I know there is a difference between cloning and imaging but I'm curious why Macrium has that restriction (nor could I find a reason in their documentation).

 

Thanks for your reply!
Dan



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:44 AM

Cloning will create a sector by sector duplicate of your source drive. I don't believe you want to do this. This is normally done when migrating to a larger drive or from a HDD to a SSD.

 

As far as creating a partition on the target drive, that was not necessary. You can create a folder on your external and place all your images into that one folder.



#5 bromberg

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 10:51 AM

Cloning will create a sector by sector duplicate of your source drive. I don't believe you want to do this. This is normally done when migrating to a larger drive or from a HDD to a SSD.

 

As far as creating a partition on the target drive, that was not necessary. You can create a folder on your external and place all your images into that one folder.

John,

 

Can't you create a sector-by-sector duplicate within a partition?

 

I have different partitions for the 3 different PCs for which I am creating an image. Now that I have a base image for each, does that mean the next time I want to update I will be given an opportunity to do a differential for the base?

 

Thanks!
Dan



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 11:00 AM

You can clone a partition but I don't see the advantage in that. You want to create an image to the external so you restore from the external to the source drive. Plus, you are losing valuable hard drive space by cloning from a partition that has a lot of free space as the clone will also have a lot of free space. Doing an image will backup only the data on the disk. 

 

Yes, if you have a base image for each PC you can do a differential on that image. I have never ran differential images on Macrium so I do not know the exact procedure. For convenience I would put each PC's image in it's own folder on the external.



#7 bromberg

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 12:20 PM

John:

Excellent point - I was worried that "imaging" would take up free space but the new image was actually ≈1/3 smaller, so I guess some compression occurred.

 

Any thoughts on this one?:  I recently had a PC that refused to boot so I restored it from the (HP) factory partition. Naturally I lost all my data but even after the restore, Recuva was able to recover some of it. In hopes that someday I will come across an even better recovery utility, I would like to preserve the current  'image' f the recovered PC so I can attempt to (possibly) recover even more data after I restore it from its present state. I don't want to let it just sit there so I'd like to use it until I try a new recovery.

 

So my question is: do you know if I can run Macrium Reflect (or any other backup/restore software) from a thumb drive (since I obviously don't want to write to it anymore)?

                                 Or do you have a better plan so I can use the PC until I'm ready to retry another recovery?

 

Thanks again,

Dan



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 01:16 PM

Any thoughts on this one?:  I recently had a PC that refused to boot so I restored it from the (HP) factory partition. Naturally I lost all my data but even after the restore, Recuva was able to recover some of it. In hopes that someday I will come across an even better recovery utility, I would like to preserve the current  'image' f the recovered PC so I can attempt to (possibly) recover even more data after I restore it from its present state. I don't want to let it just sit there so I'd like to use it until I try a new recovery.

 

 

I am not sure I understand. You can create multiple base images using Macrium and differential images from those base images. You can browse those images by double clicking them in explorer. Macrium will let you mount them to a virtual drive so you can pull any file out of the image. 

 

"I don't want to let it just sit there so I'd like to use it until I try a new recovery."  Can you explain this further.

 

So my question is: do you know if I can run Macrium Reflect (or any other backup/restore software) from a thumb drive (since I obviously don't want to write to it anymore)?

 

 

Macrium allows you to create bootable media to a USB flash drive or CD/DVD. Is this what you are asking? This will let you boot and restore your disk image to  a new drive or a drive that no longer boots because of a Windows problem. It is best to keep your images updates so you do not have to resort to a factory reset where you will need to reinstall all your programs.


Edited by JohnC_21, 03 July 2016 - 01:17 PM.


#9 bromberg

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 11:48 PM

Sorry I wasn't clear so let me attempt to re-explain:

1) My PC was unable to boot and I could not get to my data

2) My PC was restored from the factory partition (that came with the PC) which overwrote my data (due to the reformat)

3) I don't want to use the PC (even though it was successfully restored) since data will be written to the HDD making it more difficult to recover the lost data before the PC went bad

4) I know the more I use the PC the less likely I'll be to ever recover my lost data

5) But I would still like to use it as a PC

6) So I plan to use Macrium Reflect (or similar recovery software) to capture what the HDD looks like now (call it "image X") before I start writing to it

 

So if I take an image of the newly recovered PC before I make it more impossible to ever have any hopes of recovering my lost data, if I ever hear of some fantastic recovery software (that is better than Recuva) I can restore back to "image X" and attempt to recover my lost data.

 

Does this sound like a reasonable plan or is there a better way?

Thanks,

Dan



#10 RolandJS

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 03:35 AM

Bromberg, your plan is a very well thought-out plan!  I heard great things about Minitool Power Data Recovery, Stellar, R-Studio, Ultimate Restorer, and so many other fine recovery utilities -- just be ready to invest time and energy.  At worst, recovery process will be difficult and piece-meal.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 07:47 AM

1) My PC was unable to boot and I could not get to my data  - This could have been accomplished by copying you data to an external hard drive using a linux bootable disk

 

2) My PC was restored from the factory partition (that came with the PC) which overwrote my data (due to the reformat)  -  Your chances of recovering any data after a reformat and factory reset is now very slim as the drive has been written to during the reset.

 

6) So I plan to use Macrium Reflect (or similar recovery software) to capture what the HDD looks like now (call it "image X") before I start writing to it - This is a good plan but I recommend you create a disk image using Testdisk. By doing this you can use PhotoRec to scan the image and recover any files it finds. The target drive for the image should be NTFS. You can launch Testdisk from a bootable Parted Magic disk. It would be easier to attach the disk to another computer and use the WIndows version of testdisk to create the image. Creating the disk with Macrium would require you to restore it to another disk and work on that using PhotoRec or another tool while using an image would let you scan it on another computer if it had the space requirements eliminating the clone to another drive but as stated the drive that is storing the image must have at least the amount of space as the hard drive you are imaging as it will be a one to one cloned image.

 

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Image_Creation

 

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Media_Image


Edited by JohnC_21, 04 July 2016 - 02:13 PM.


#12 bromberg

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 01:10 PM

I'll look into TestDisk (for my Windows system).

BTW, it appears that 2 of your 4 links were repeated but I'll just download TestDisk from the cgsecurity site and take it from there.

 

Even though I did a reformat and factory reset, Recuva did recover some files, however, many appear to be corrupted and cannot be opened.

In fact Recuva recovered thousands of files (many useless) with strange names given to them so my dilemma is how much time to spend going through them all ?!?

It would be nice if there was a utility that would sort through them, discarding the unopenable files and leaving only the files that can be opened.

 

Also, there are many repeated files (with the same content, different filename) - I guess because I must have somehow created multiple copies over time that I deleted?

Perhaps TestDisk will do a better job of recovering my files than Recuva did (though like you said, I don't have high hopes).

 

You referred to PhotoRec which I assume is meant for picture & video recovery; however, the bulk of what I want to recover are PDF files.

 

Thanks,

Dan



#13 bromberg

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 01:11 PM

Roland:

Thanks for the encouragement!

Dan



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 02:13 PM

Testdisk is used to recover partitions. In your case you would need to use PhotoRec on the image created by Testdisk. PhotoRec would scan the image for any recoverable files. 

 

Sorry about the double links. I don't know how that happened.



#15 bromberg

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Posted 05 July 2016 - 11:42 AM

John:

   So PhotoRec recovers files other than photos (like PDFs) ? If so, they should change the name.

 

  Thanks for pointing me to TestDisk/PhotoRec. I look forward to trying them and will post my results.

Dan






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