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Is there a Difference between SQLite and SQLite Manager?


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#1 DefaultGateway

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 08:20 AM

Is there a Difference between SQLite and SQLite Manager?

I have searched on Google and YouTube, but I don't know the answer.



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#2 DefaultGateway

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 03:50 AM

I already know the answer, this topic can be closed. :lol:

 

SQLite = Command Prompt

SQLite Manager = Graphical User Interface



#3 Stafeegraph

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 01:11 AM

Hi, The main difference between SQLite and SQLite Manager can be summarrized as

 

What's particularly notable about SQLite is that unlike all the others, this database software doesn't come with a daemon that queries are passed through. This means that if multiple processes are using the database at once, they will be directly altering the data through the SQLite library and making the read / write data calls to the OS themselves. It also means that the locking mechanisms don't deal with contention very well.

This isn't a problem for most applications that where one would think of using SQLite -- the small overhead benefits and easy data retrieval are worth it. However, if you'll be accessing your database with more than one process or don't consider mapping all your requests through one thread, it could be slightly troublesome.

Sqlite is very light version of SQL supporting many features of SQL.Basically is been developed for small devices like mobile phones, tablets etc.

SQLite is a third party ,open-sourced and in-process database engine. SQL Server Compact is from Microsoft, and is a stripped-down version of SQL Server.They are two competing database engines.

SQL is query language. Sqlite is embeddable relational database management system.

Sqlite also doesn't require a special database server or anything. It's just a direct filesystem engine that uses SQL syntax.

Sqlite also doesn't require a special database server or anything. It's just a direct filesystem engine that uses SQL syntax.

Techinically, SQLite is not open-source software but rather public domain. There is no license.


Edited by Stafeegraph, 04 July 2016 - 01:15 AM.


#4 DefaultGateway

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 11:19 AM

Thanks for your Reply. :wink:






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