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only 3% SSD memory left


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#1 jimlau

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 12:38 PM

I know when a HDD becomes nearly full the computer is slowed down. Does that apply to SSDs as well? I have about 5GB left on a 250GB SSD.

 

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Jim

 



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#2 Viper_Security

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 12:44 PM

No it should not get slower, the Solid part in SSD means there is ZERO moving parts in there and the speed it is, is what it is. cant get faster can't get slower, think of it as a big flash drive.


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#3 dc3

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 01:43 PM

No it should not get slower, the Solid part in SSD means there is ZERO moving parts in there and the speed it is, is what it is. cant get faster can't get slower, think of it as a big flash drive.

This actually is not quite accurate.

 

The following is an excerpt from a article at the How-To Geek website.

 

"You should leave some free space on your solid-state drive or its write performance will slow down dramatically. This may be surprising, but it’s actually fairly simple to understand.

 
When an SSD has a lot of free space, it has a lot of empty blocks. When you go to write a file, it writes that file’s data into the empty blocks.
 
When an SSD has little free space, it has a lot of partially filled blocks. When you go to write a file, it will have to read the partially filled block into its cache, modify the partially-filled block with the new data, and then write it back to the hard drive. This will need to happen with every block the file must be written to.
 
In other words, writing to an empty block is fairly quick, but writing to a partially-filled block involves reading the partially-filled block, modifying its value, and then writing it back. Repeat this many, many times for each file you write to the drive as the file will likely consume many blocks."

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#4 Viper_Security

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 01:50 PM

 

No it should not get slower, the Solid part in SSD means there is ZERO moving parts in there and the speed it is, is what it is. cant get faster can't get slower, think of it as a big flash drive.

This actually is not quite accurate.

 

The following is an excerpt from a article at the How-To Geek website.

 

"You should leave some free space on your solid-state drive or its write performance will slow down dramatically. This may be surprising, but it’s actually fairly simple to understand.

 
When an SSD has a lot of free space, it has a lot of empty blocks. When you go to write a file, it writes that file’s data into the empty blocks.
 
When an SSD has little free space, it has a lot of partially filled blocks. When you go to write a file, it will have to read the partially filled block into its cache, modify the partially-filled block with the new data, and then write it back to the hard drive. This will need to happen with every block the file must be written to.
 
In other words, writing to an empty block is fairly quick, but writing to a partially-filled block involves reading the partially-filled block, modifying its value, and then writing it back. Repeat this many, many times for each file you write to the drive as the file will likely consume many blocks."

 

As i said it "Shouldn't" it is possible however. but thank you for going into more detail. :)


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#5 Drillingmachine

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 02:36 PM

With so little amount of free space your SSD will also degrade much faster. Reasons explained above.






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