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Thinking of doing a frugal Puppy install...


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#1 66Batmobile

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Posted 24 June 2016 - 08:30 PM

Greets everyone,

 

Now that I've played with it for a while, I may do as the title suggests.  I've been researching how to do so, and found another great tutorial by Al1000:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/579574/how-to-install-puppy-linux-frugal-and-configure-grub2-bootloader/

 

Seems pretty straightforward.  There are a few things I'm hoping a few of our Puppy experts might be able to clarify just to be safe:

  • The tutorial recommends setting a dedicated partition for the install.  Does this mean going into GParted and allocating one before starting, or can you take care of that in the Universal installer?

 

  • Do you have to set up everything like WiFi, time and date, firewall etc during install, or can that wait until it's actually running?

 

  • Step #7 regarding the NEWGRUBTEXT file-I'm going to have to write myself a cheat sheet to do the whole thing anyway (1 machine), so can I skip putting this on an existing partition and just copy down the necessary info?

As always thanks in advance :thumbup2:

 

 


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#2 Al1000

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 02:15 AM

The tutorial recommends setting a dedicated partition for the install.


That's just what I do, but isn't necessary. If you install it on an existing partition, other operating systems will just see it as a directory.
 

Does this mean going into GParted and allocating one before starting, or can you take care of that in the Universal installer?


If you want a dedicated partition then yes, you would have to create one beforehand. All Puppy's Universal Installer really does, when you select Frugal, is copy some files from the ISO to a directory on your HDD (or whatever you're installing Puppy on), which can easily be done manually too.
 
 

Do you have to set up everything like WiFi, time and date, firewall etc during install, or can that wait until it's actually running?



This is all normally done when you first boot Puppy up, at the Welcome Screen. So long as you create a save file or save directory when prompted to do so, when you shut down, your settings should be saved.

In saying that though it doesn't have to be done at the Welcome Screen, and can also be done later.
 
 

Step #7 regarding the NEWGRUBTEXT file-I'm going to have to write myself a cheat sheet to do the whole thing anyway (1 machine), so can I skip putting this on an existing partition and just copy down the necessary info?



This would be the same whether you install on a new partition or not; just make sure you use the UUID for whatever partition you use. Is that what you're asking? If not please can you rephrase the question?

Edited by Al1000, 25 June 2016 - 02:17 AM.


#3 66Batmobile

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 10:44 AM


 
 

Step #7 regarding the NEWGRUBTEXT file-I'm going to have to write myself a cheat sheet to do the whole thing anyway (1 machine), so can I skip putting this on an existing partition and just copy down the necessary info?



This would be the same whether you install on a new partition or not; just make sure you use the UUID for whatever partition you use. Is that what you're asking? If not please can you rephrase the question?

 

Sorry for the confusion.  What I meant was, I only have this machine, so before I go to do the install, I'm going to have to actually write down the steps from the tutorial to refer to while setting it up.  

Regarding the NEWGRUBTEXT file, I was asking if, instead of saving it to my MInt partition, I could just write down the info in it when it pops up during the install and go from there, instead of having to mount the other partition, etc.

 

edit-Be back later in the day.


Edited by 66Batmobile, 25 June 2016 - 10:52 AM.

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#4 Al1000

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 12:38 PM

Ah, now I understand. Thanks for the clarification. Looking at the tutorial again, I'm not sure why I bothered including that step, as the only information you need from the NEWGRUBTEXT file is the name of the directory (/tahr6.0frugal/ in the tutorial), which you can also find by simply looking at it. :) It might have been because I was used to saving the file as I used to use Grub4Dos. You can skip that step completely though, and just look up the name of the directory Puppy is installed in, when you boot back into your other Linux operating system to edit the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file.

Edited by Al1000, 25 June 2016 - 12:39 PM.


#5 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 06:10 PM

Hi, 66Batmobile.

 

Well, now; you can set-up a partition for Puppy before installing, or you can do this from within the Universal installer. Both will work, though, to be fair, it'll be easier to do this before starting out.

 

Your average Puppy doesn't need much more than 5-10 GB, tops.....and most of this will be gradually occupied by the save-file/ folder as it expands, over time, with installed apps, configuration & settings. Most people in Puppyland tend to only make their system partition big enough for Puppy itself, and set up dedicated data partitions for all their own stuff. These are then 'sym-linked' back into Puppy's /root directory from the data partition, so that when you click on the entry for, say, Documents, Downloads, Pictures, Music, etc., Puppy is actually reading from outside 'Puppy-space'. It's essentially a link to an external source.....and a way of keeping the save-file/folder as small as possible.

 

There's also the business of the SFS packages, too. These are essentially .pet packages which have been further compressed (I forget with which type off the top of my head!), and, due to an extremely clever piece of scripting by Shinobar, one of our Japanese members, are able to be mounted, or 'loaded' into the file-system 'on-the-fly' while the system is running. They can be unloaded this way, too. These are invariably mounted at your /mnt/home directory, again, keeping them outside of 'Puppy-space' (the save-file/folder). It sounds complicated, I know, but trust me, it's very, very simple once you get the hang of it.

 

Al1000 is correct, as well. It's perfectly possible to install Puppy to a directory inside a partition, because when Puppy is looking for a bootable system, it searches two layers deep; not only partitions, but directories within partitions. Many people set-up one main partition for all their Puppies, and then install them into a series of directories within that partition.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

With regards to actually booting Puppy from a multi-boot environment. I've read Al's tutorial myself; it's exceptionally well presented, and these are indeed the steps you will need to take if you wish to boot using GRUB2. But with all respect to Al (meaning no disrespect!), in all honesty, why bother? Puppy's Grub4DOS bootloader will take care of your entire booting needs.

 

I don't wish to raise anybody's hackles by stating this, but in all honesty, GRUB2 is nothing more than an unnecessarily over-complicated pain in the **** to set-up and maintain; in the case of Puppy, the more so, since Puppy doesn't need, or have any use for, a separate /boot partition. To my mind, whichever bright spark within the Linux community came up with the notion of GRUB2, and thought it was a 'good idea', needs their head examining. I know the days of 'RTFM' are supposed to be behind us, but I can't think of anything more designed to maintain the old, carefully nurtured aura of mystique and 'clique-iness' that used to surround the whole subject of Linux.

 

Believe it or not, this is still the popular view of a Linux user, even today...  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

 

Q5k2bYo.jpg

 

[                                                              The 'Neckbeard'                                                               ]

 

 

Ho, ho, ho.....  :P  Unfortunately, guys'n'gals, it's true..!  :rolleyes:

 

(Let's face it, if you can't even get your system to boot, then what hope have you got of actually running the system? Run back to Windows, little boy...)

 

It used to be just like that. And new users who stuck with it through the 'wall of silence' (sic) that used to accompany their attempts to garner painfully-accrued knowledge about their new system, were gradually indoctrinated into the whole ethos of 'Why do something the easy way, when there's a method that's 10 times more awkward and complicated to do exactly the same thing..?'

 

This is not the way to attract new users.....

 

Enough of that. I've said my piece. 'Rant' over..!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Puppy's Grub4DOS is essentially a 'tweaked' version of the old 'Legacy' GRUB, or pre-GRUB2 version, re-scripted to deal with Puppy's admittedly unusual way of doing things. And before anybody pipes up and says 'But Grub4DOS is unmaintained, and is a huge security risk..!', let me just say this. For the publicly available version of Grub4DOS, this is true; Puppy's version, however, is strictly maintained by the community developers, and is as secure as anything you will find.

 

Grub4DOS will find, and boot from, anything. And I mean anything. I know many Linux 'purists' will hate the whole idea of something which is totally GUI-based, and is merely a case of clicking your way through (with a very small amount of 'optional' name-editing involved). But why make life any harder than it has to be? Grub4DOS is one of Puppy's hidden 'gems'.....which makes Puppy accessible to everybody. I've had it booting multi-boot systems including Puppy, Xubuntu, Zorin Lite, SliTaz, Tiny Core, and Knoppix, without the slightest problem or hiccup. 

 

The boot stage is one of those that you just want to work, without fanfare, as efficiently, unobtrusively, and quickly as possible.....so you can get on with doing what you actually want to do. Does anybody here dispute this?  :rolleyes:  :P  'Cos if so, I'd love to hear your reasoning....!  :lol:

 

Well, Batmobile, there you have my thoughts, and tips on the matter. The next steps, really, are up to you. Any further questions, just ask away.....

 

Edit:- As for setting up your wi-fi, date, time, keyboard, locales, firewall, etc, you can either do this at the initial set of 'Welcome' screens, or if you wish, Puppy has a built-in utility that permits you to 're-run' the initial set-up stage all over again. But I'll echo Al; make sure you set up your save-file/folder at the end of the session, to ensure your settings get saved! You'll find it under 'Menu>Setup>QuickSetup first-run settings'.

 

Hope that helps.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 26 June 2016 - 03:24 AM.

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#6 66Batmobile

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 10:05 PM

@Al1000

Noted :thumbup2:

 

@Mike_Walsh

Thanks for the input.  I actually came across some of the same info about Grub4DOS reading the Puppy forums.  For the moment, I think I'll try it as per Al's tutorial, only because I'm somewhat more familiar with Grub2, and I'd like to avoid changing anything with my current partitions other than updating Grub.

 

Speaking of which, the current set-up is Mint 17.2 (40Gb root), Mate 16.04 (40Gb root) and the rest of the HDD is unallocated.  When I get to play with this, do I make the Puppy partition another root one?


Edited by 66Batmobile, 25 June 2016 - 10:10 PM.

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#7 NickAu

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 10:12 PM

 

GRUB2 is nothing more than an unnecessarily over-complicated pain in the **** to set-up and maintain;

You get no argument from me.

 

 

Believe it or not, this is still the popular view of a Linux user, even today...

The 'Neckbeard'

I love bow ties, I wear glasses and have a neckbeard.  Problems? :hysterical:



#8 66Batmobile

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 10:43 PM

As long as we're off topic for a moment...

 

Nick, please tell us you don't have the haircut or the vest from the picture...

 

 

 

Kidding :P


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#9 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 05:23 AM

Morning, Batmobile.

 

 

@Mike_Walsh

Thanks for the input.  I actually came across some of the same info about Grub4DOS reading the Puppy forums.  For the moment, I think I'll try it as per Al's tutorial, only because I'm somewhat more familiar with Grub2, and I'd like to avoid changing anything with my current partitions other than updating Grub.

 

Speaking of which, the current set-up is Mint 17.2 (40Gb root), Mate 16.04 (40Gb root) and the rest of the HDD is unallocated.  When I get to play with this, do I make the Puppy partition another root one?

Mmm... See, this is where things start getting a little bit convoluted with Puppy! If you're used to, and familiar with the 'buntu-based distros, then you're used to a /~ partition. which then contains a /boot directory, a /root directory, and /home, /media, /usr, /etc, and all the rest of it. In other words, a bog-standard, normal 'full' Linux installation, where you only have one of each directory.

 

Puppy's structure is a wee bit different. As Al pointed out, Puppy doesn't use the /media directory at all. Everything sits within /mnt.....even the /~ directory; except in Puppy it's called the /mnt/home directory. Everything else sits inside this.... Plus, Puppy runs as root. All the time..!!  I've known seasoned Ubuntu users almost have heart attacks when they discover this for the first time; how insecure...arrgh! Sudo doesn't even get a look-in with Puppy.

 

We do, however, have the 'spot' and 'fido' directories.......  :scratchhead:  :lol:

 

Have a read of this; it explains most of the objections that are made against this:-

 

http://barryk.org/puppylinux/technical/root.htm

 

Puppy's structure is much the same as 'normal' Linux; it's just laid out a bit differently because of fitting the 'save-file/folder' into the scheme of things. With Puppy:-

 

1) / is your base level, complete with the normal Linux file-system.  The core files, and save-file/folder reside at /mnt/home.....but everything at this level is untouchable, as it's all 'read-only'. Can't be corrupted in any way. This is why every single boot of Puppy is like a brand-new, first time boot.

 

2) Inside the save-file/folder, ahhh; this is what throws new Puppy users out.....even if they're experienced Linux users! Inside the save-file/folder is a second complete Linux file-system.....a file-system within a file-system, as it were. This is the 'user' version, which can be written to and altered. This is the one that needs to be backed up on a regular basis.

 

Puppy's perceived inherent insecurity can be laid at the feet of this system, due to the fact that not only do most 'noobs' not understand about the read-only 'outer' file-system containing the second, 'inner' writable one.....but many seasoned, 'traditional' Linux veterans have a job getting their heads around it, too..!

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

My advice, for now, is to create a new partition of around 10 GiB with gParted; 10240MiB, if you like. Run Puppy as the LiveCD. Install Puppy to this partition as a frugal install. Copy/paste the GRUB2 information that the installer will give you as a text file, and save it somewhere you can find it easily afterwards. Shut Puppy down.

 

Re-boot into one of your other two installs. At this point, Puppy will be invisible to GRUB2; it will not see it, even if you run GRUB's install routine, because of Puppy's unusual layout. You'll need to go into GRUB, and edit the main file to add the information that you've saved in the text-file. I'm sorry I can't be more specific about some of the exact terms, as it's so long since I've bothered with the 'buntu-based distros!

 

With any luck (I've never actually done this, as I used Grub4DOS right from the outset), you should get Puppy's entry come up when you next boot, and should be able to select Puppy, and boot into it. As I understand it, GRUB2 runs from the /boot partition, whereas Grub4DOS works at the MBR/BIOS level.....but I'm no expert in these things. One or two of the regular contributors on the Ubuntu Forums have made a special point of studying the entire boot process, and are real experts with it; they understand it inside-out. I don't..!

 

I'm suggesting you do things this way, because I don't believe GRUB2 will work with Puppy if you install it to a directory within a partition. It's not written to work this way; it boots partitions, not directories. This is one of the major 'tweaks' that Puppy's version of Grub4DOS has had.....and is one of the main reasons why it will boot literally anything. I think that's where the 'rootnoverify' option comes into play; it's telling GRUB2 that it's not looking for a /root partition.....but as I said, I'm no expert with GRUB2.

 

Also, at this point you are, as you say, more familiar with GRUB2.....so it's best to remain on familiar territory. Don't create the new partition as a /root one; in this case, Puppy doesn't need it, since it runs as root.

 

Confusing, isn't it?   :o  :lol:

 

Hopefully, that'll help. Give it a try, and let us know how you get on, please.

 

EDIT:- So that you can see what I mean, this is my current Grub4DOS 'menu.lst' in sda1...

# menu.lst produced by grub4dosconfig-v1.9.2color white/blue black/cyan white/black cyan/black
#splashimage=/splash.xpm
timeout 10
default 0


# Frugal installed Puppy


title Tahrpup 6.05 (sda5)
  uuid 68a68393-aafc-4bf8-bac3-95dff30af730
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title OB Precise 'Chromepup' (sda6)
  uuid a818e46d-19ec-4b67-99e5-6d66ea2830e0
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title Slacko 5.7.0 (sda7)
  uuid 5e7d7e8b-7524-400f-85fd-cc36b10eca76
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title ...sda7/LupuSuper2-5.2.8.7
  uuid 5e7d7e8b-7524-400f-85fd-cc36b10eca76
  kernel /LupuSuper2-5.2.8.7/vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd psubdir=LupuSuper2-5.2.8.7 pfix=fsck
  initrd /LupuSuper2-5.2.8.7/initrd.gz


title Tahrpup64 6.0.5 (sda8)
  uuid 64f75545-9bdf-467e-bfe1-2197ea297920
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title Lighthouse64 'Mariner' Edition (sda9)
  uuid 6b127a16-3cdd-46b1-ad72-ba39566f6ba1
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.xz


title Precise 5.7.1 (sdb1)
  uuid 8f1f35ca-c5a3-42fa-a8ff-bb82f823733d
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title X-Slacko 2.3.2 (sdb2)
  uuid 570c732a-ef25-428c-b1c9-5a43288e7b16
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


title Slacko64 6.3.0 (sdb3)
  uuid a4cdb5f4-2d8b-44ff-8f24-c6180efb9420
  kernel /vmlinuz  pmedia=atahd  pfix=fsck
  initrd /initrd.gz


# Windows
# this entry searches Windows on the HDD and boot it up
title Windows\nBoot up Windows if installed
  errorcheck off
  find --set-root --ignore-floppies --ignore-cd  /bootmgr
  chainloader /bootmgr
  find --set-root --ignore-floppies --ignore-cd  /ntldr
  chainloader /ntldr
  find --set-root --ignore-floppies --ignore-cd   /io.sys
  chainloader /io.sys
  errorcheck on


# Advanced Menu
title Advanced menu
  configfile /menu-advanced.lst
  commandline
The first six Pups are all in an extended partition on the main 500 GB WD Caviar 'Blue'; the last three are on a 32 GB Kingspec PATA SSD. Don't ask..! :P  
 
If you look at the 'LupuSuper' entry ('Lucid' Puppy), this particular one is installed to a directory within the 'Slacko' 570 partition.....and Grub4DOS quite happily boots this. That's why there are two entries with the same UUID...and why the 'psubdir' kernel-line argument is employed.  I'm posting from 'Lucid' Puppy right now.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 26 June 2016 - 07:28 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

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Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

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#10 66Batmobile

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Posted 26 June 2016 - 10:26 PM

@Mike_Walsh

Perhaps I shall ponder further on how to set this up...now that I understand the points you were getting at (only had to read through everything 7 times instead of my usual 25 :P ), I may hold off until after the dust settles when Mate 16.04.1 and Mint 18 are released and proceed from there...

 

The adventure continues...


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#11 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:20 AM

No probs, Bats. Let us know how you get on if, as & when you attempt it. Sorry for the extreme verbosity, but I tend to explain things as if I were the 'noob', and didn't understand the first thing about the subject! I know you're not that much of a novice...  :P

 

I shall be kicking around somewhere under foot.....  

 

 

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#12 Al1000

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 06:59 AM

or you can do this from within the Universal installer


Right enough, I forgot there's a link to GParted in Universal Installer.
 

it'll be easier to do this before starting out


Agreed.
 

But with all respect to Al (meaning no disrespect!), in all honesty, why bother? Puppy's Grub4DOS bootloader will take care of your entire booting needs.


I would be interested in discussing the pros and cons of different bootloaders with you, but it would be off-topic to do so in this thread. I might start a new thread on bootloaders within the next few days where we can discuss this, or if you wish to do so then I'll chime in.

Anyone that has Grub2 installed to the MBR, as the OP will have if he installed Grub2 to its default location, will find that after installing Grub4Dos, Grub2 overwrites Grub4dos whenever it's updated, meaning that Grub4dos has to be reinstalled whenever this happens. (Of course, Grub4dos does not get updated)
 

GRUB2 is nothing more than an unnecessarily over-complicated pain in the **** to set-up and maintain; in the case of Puppy, the more so, since Puppy doesn't need, or have any use for, a separate /boot partition.


Other Linux distros don't need a seperate /boot partition either, though.
 

And before anybody pipes up and says 'But Grub4DOS is unmaintained, and is a huge security risk..!', let me just say this. For the publicly available version of Grub4DOS, this is true; Puppy's version, however, is strictly maintained by the community developers, and is as secure as anything you will find.


I can find references to the grub4dosconfig version you are using (grub4dosconfig-v1.9.2) dating back to 2009 on the internet. Is there a newer version?
 

/~ directory; except in Puppy it's called the /mnt/home directory


This can be confusing since the user's home directory in Puppy is /root.
# cat /proc/version 
Linux version 2.6.33.2 (root@puppypc) (gcc version 4.4.3 (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) ) #1 SMP Thu May 27 10:56:32 EST 2010
# cd ~
# pwd
/root

Copy/paste the GRUB2 information that the installer will give you as a text file, and save it somewhere you can find it easily afterwards.


You mean the information for Grub4Dos? The Puppy installer doesn't give the information for Grub2.
 

GRUB2 runs from the /boot partition, whereas Grub4DOS works at the MBR/BIOS level


Both Grub2 and Grub4Dos can be installed to either a partition (file system), or to the MBR. (Grub4Dos won't work with UEFI) As the name suggests, Grub4Dos is designed to be installed to a Windows file system.

@66Batmobile Here's another way of writing the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file. While it's probably advisable to use UUID numbers, you can also simply direct the bootloader to the correct partition using the hd designation. This is the /etc/grub.d/40_custom file I originally edited in LXLE, and now use in antiX:
#!/bin/sh
exec tail -n +3 $0
# This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries.  Simply type the
# menu entries you want to add after this comment.  Be careful not to change
# the 'exec tail' line above.
menuentry "Lucid Puppy 5.2.8.6 (frugal on sda5)" {
set root='(hd0,5)'
linux /puppy528/vmlinuz pmedia=atahd psubdir=puppy528
initrd /puppy528/initrd.gz
}

Edited by Al1000, 27 June 2016 - 07:01 AM.


#13 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 09:19 AM

Hi, Al. 

 

Thanks for correcting one or two of my more obvious mistakes...  :P

 

You're quite right; both bootloaders will install to either location. I wasn't aware that GRUB2 would overwrite Grub4DOS, but thinking about it, it would; and the other would need to be re-installed.

 

It's so long since I've used the 'buntu-based distros that I'd forgotten every time you get a kernel upgrade, 'sudo update-grub' re-runs itself.

 

And the boot info from the Universal Installer? I honestly thought that was the info for adding to GRUB2; I shall have to look at that a bit more closely when I next install another Pup.

 

And as for Grub4DOS itself; as I understand it, Puppy's version is based on one from a few years back, yes; but of course, the community developers aren't necessarily going to update the version number as they keep it patched. The Woof-CE developers, it's not their place to change version numbers on something that's not actually their project (if you think about it).

 

Anyway; thanks for watching my back! I don't want to be giving out duff information now, do I?  :lol:

 

Edit:- Just found this on the Puppy Forum. I had no idea this one even existed; it appears it's designed to work with the long-standing GRUB2 problem of not being able to auto-detect Puppy, due to Puppy's unusual configuration.

 

http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=692147

 

Looks interesting.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 June 2016 - 09:30 AM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#14 Al1000

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 11:03 AM

And the boot info from the Universal Installer? I honestly thought that was the info for adding to GRUB2


It contains info for booting from Grub4Dos, and from the old version of Grub, but definitely not for Grub2. I posted a screenshot of the NEWGRUBTEXT file in my tutorial. You can see it refers to menu.lst, but Grub2 doesn't have a menu.lst file.
 

And as for Grub4DOS itself; as I understand it, Puppy's version is based on one from a few years back, yes; but of course, the community developers aren't necessarily going to update the version number as they keep it patched. The Woof-CE developers, it's not their place to change version numbers on something that's not actually their project (if you think about it).


Nobody told Shinobar. :)

http://shino.pos.to/linux/puppy/

Anyway; thanks for watching my back! I don't want to be giving out duff information now, do I?


I do this with everyone, and I hope you return the favour. :)

Edit:- Just found this on the Puppy Forum. I had no idea this one even existed; it appears it's designed to work with the long-standing GRUB2 problem of not being able to auto-detect Puppy, due to Puppy's unusual configuration.


That appears to be the old version of Grub, or at least a variation of it, now being called "Grub Legacy."

#15 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 12:38 PM

Hey, Al.

 

 

 

Nobody told Shinobar.  :)

http://shino.pos.to/linux/puppy/

Hm. Point taken.....but I think those are the progressive version numbers of his pets, aren't they? I could be wrong (it's been known to happen on occasion..!)  :P

 

 

Anyway; thanks for watching my back! I don't want to be giving out duff information now, do I?

 

I do this with everyone, and I hope you return the favour.  :)

 

Of course I'll return the favour. Where we're trying to give good, sensible advice, we need to present a 'united front', rather than be contradicting each other.....or else it gives completely the wrong impression. No worries.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 27 June 2016 - 12:39 PM.

Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 





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