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Purchasing a Used Laptop for Travel


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#1 Roteak

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 10:57 PM

Hello, 

 

So I'm attempting to find myself a good deal on a decent laptop that is on the higher end of the spectrum when it comes to processing power.

 

I need decent rig that can edit videos and photos during my travels, not super fancy, just need it to get the job done. I don't care about graphics cards since I won't be gaming or anything like that.

 

I've found many elitebooks and ultrabooks that have Core i7's 2.2GHtz+ with Turbo Boost and 8GB+ of RAM with decent size SSD's selling for a couple hundred ($100-300). However these are older models, some dating back to 2011.

 

I'm confused as to why they sell so cheap if their hardware is better than some newer models I've been looking at. Back when they first released they sold for a couple G's -- that might have something to do with it, but it still doesn't explain why newer laptops have such bleep hardware compared to laptops from 5 years ago.

 

For example...

 

Someone is selling this laptop for $100 

 

Note: I'm a noob at this, hence why I'm here...

 

I would appreciate someone educating me on this topic and helping me nab a good deal on a laptop, thank you. ^.^

 


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#2 Roteak

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 11:15 PM

Laptop or Desktop?
Laptop
 
My budget for the new computer is: 
Not a lot. Couple hundo.
 
What are the primary uses for this computer (IE: mail, web browsing, programming, games, etc)? 
General use, editing videos/photos, and programming (learning to anyways)
 
Will you be overclocking?
IDK what overclocking means.


#3 SEANIA

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 04:32 AM

I've found many elitebooks and ultrabooks that have Core i7's 2.2GHtz+ with Turbo Boost and 8GB+ of RAM with decent size SSD's selling for a couple hundred ($100-300). However these are older models, some dating back to 2011.

 

I'm confused as to why they sell so cheap if their hardware is better than some newer models I've been looking at. Back when they first released they sold for a couple G's -- that might have something to do with it, but it still doesn't explain why newer laptops have such bleep hardware compared to laptops from 5 years ago.

 

I would appreciate someone educating me on this topic and helping me nab a good deal on a laptop, thank you. ^.^

 

Where are you getting the idea that the hardware in it is better then the newer models? 
 

The branding i7, i5, i3, Celeron, Pentium, and Atom are just generic ways of listing what market it is that they're targeted at. Has little to nothing to do with what the CPU actually is.

A i7 from 5 years ago running at 2.6Ghz is nowhere near as fast as a i7 made today running at 2.6Ghz. Meaning clock speed isn't relevant when comparing different generations of CPUs, and thus a 5Ghz CPU can (and has) been beaten out by a 3.5Ghz CPU.

Further more, I mentioned generations. Like I said, those terms "i7, i5, i3..." are just generic market labels for the use case, and they've been using these labels since 2008. Meaning that there are now a total of six different (arguably 5) generations of entirely different CPUs all still using the same branding. That, when simply looking at that market label, makes them all look like the same generation/CPU. In reality though, there are modern i3's (daily use/office CPUs) that can match or even out-perform the first generation of i7's in video editing (pretty much what i7's are made to do).

 

The i7 line is built for what you want. However it's a 2nd generation chip. That said, for the price that you quoted the laptop at, it's a steal and you wont find anything new that performs as good for it for that price. The downside being that the older 2nd generation of "i" series CPUs aren't nearly as power efficient as today's 6th generation "i" series of CPUs. You can't expect the battery life to last very long when editing. When on a full charge I'd expect the i7 in it to drain it in a hour or two max. 

 

All that out of the way. Since it is a used laptop (being used considerably drops the price), it still probably has the original battery that the owner never bothered to replace. The battery that is almost certainly dead because of its age alone. It may give the allusion of taking a charge, but that charge is easily 1/10th that of what it was new. Investing in a new battery for it would be a must if you plan on using it off battery in any capacity. 

 

It being used means there could be a whole series of issues. Might be why it's so cheap (check the description or ask them in some way). Laptops, by nature, aren't very durable, and is why used ones are so inexpensive in general. laptops, with average care taken, last about 5 years. So if you're buying a laptop with 3 years of daily use already off of it, then you can only expect another 2 from it before something is bound to break (think of it like a car hitting 250,000 miles. Not that anything is wrong with it, but after that long something is bound to give soon.) With desktops this is around 10 years, and with smart phones it's 2 1/2. 

 

I think I covered everything you asked. let me know if I completely misinterpreted what you meant. 


Edited by SEANIA, 23 June 2016 - 04:34 AM.

99% of the time, I edit for type-o's and grammar. I'll note it if that's not the case. 

I write near essays for most my responses, and then try to condense as best I can to the introduction of one. Less is more. Let me know if I post to much. 

I do a lot of spacing for readability. Let me know if that makes my posts seem to big. 





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