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Which distro for AMD graphics?


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#1 Davezor

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 08:57 AM

Hey there! 

 

First, I would like to apologize if this has been answered somewhere already (I couldn't find it using the search feature).

 

I bought a new laptop for college and want to move from Windows to Linux since every professor here uses Linux and it'll

be handy to learn my way around it. I always wanted to check it out but always had problems that turned me off from it.

 

I installed Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and had major graphic problems, such as screen flickering and tearing when I was moving the mouse or watching videos,

computer not waking from sleep without 5 minute white-line screen flickering and so on...

 

Now, I posted in a similar thread and someone recommended Ubuntu 14.04 LTS which apparently works fine with AMD graphics but I was thinking

more of Arch Linux... Is this distro okay with AMD graphics (R7 M340 to be exact)? I know it's kind of advanced but I want to fully dive into Linux if

I change my OS.

 

Any other recommendations?

 

Thanks for your time! :)



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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 09:29 AM

Hi there again, Davezor!

 

I would not recommend Arch Linux to someone just starting out with Linux. It is quite a bit more complicated than any other one out there in terms of installation. It requires you to install the OS all from the command line and you need to one, know how to use a CLI, and two, know what you need to install. If you want to give Arch a go, I would suggest Manjaro. It gives you a graphical installer and is a derivative of Arch, so it uses its repositories and such. It is a pretty good OS as well, I have played with it before.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 21 June 2016 - 09:30 AM.

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#3 Davezor

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 09:47 AM

Hi there again, Davezor!

 

I would not recommend Arch Linux to someone just starting out with Linux. It is quite a bit more complicated than any other one out there in terms of installation. It requires you to install the OS all from the command line and you need to one, know how to use a CLI, and two, know what you need to install. If you want to give Arch a go, I would suggest Manjaro. It gives you a graphical installer and is a derivative of Arch, so it uses its repositories and such. It is a pretty good OS as well, I have played with it before.

 

Thank you again for a quick answer. :) Is the newest version bug-free for graphics, or should I use an older edition? 



#4 DeimosChaos

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:12 PM

You should be able to use the newest version. I haven't heard of any issues with Arch Linux and AMD. Though I am not completely up on what they are doing, but I think it will be fine.


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#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 06:12 PM

Manjaro 16.06 seems to be good, also try fedora.

I am currently playing with fedora 24 and it seems rock solid though its installer leaves a lot to be desired.


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#6 cat1092

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 12:29 AM

Until there's a fix, if you're going to be running any Ubuntu based OS's, which includes a lot of popular distros, including Linux Mint, then it's best to stick with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Linux Mint 17.3 LTS, and there's an extensive list that goes with the Ubuntu base. Zorin OS, Peach OSI, any distro that ends in 'buntu' & others that I can't think of off the top of my head, are included here. 

 

This also includes the latest Peppermint release, which I believe to be version 7. 

 

Hopefully there will be an upgrade to the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to address this graphics issue with AMD, which some may not notice at all, while others with larger cards may. May simply be luck of the draw. :)

 

Good Luck in finding a distro that will suit your AMD graphics, I'm sure that the 'try & see' method will land you with a Linux distro in little time. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 03:15 AM

This also includes the latest Peppermint release, which I believe to be version 7. 

Yep, Peppermint 6 is based on 14.04 and Peppermint 7 on 16.04 (both LTS).  :wink:

 

Greets!



#8 cat1092

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 04:59 AM

 

This also includes the latest Peppermint release, which I believe to be version 7. 

Yep, Peppermint 6 is based on 14.04 and Peppermint 7 on 16.04 (both LTS).  :wink:

 

Greets!

 

 

Yes, Peppermint 6 & 7 are both very good, just forgot to mention to those who has troubles with version 7, to try the previous one, it's supported until April 2019, as are most all of the OS's built on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. :)

 

By chance, Peppermint 4 ran great on what was a very dated ATI Mobility Radeon 7500 GPU chip, on what was then close to a 10 year old notebook. The only reason I didn't keep it was due to the release of Linux Mint 13, by which chance it & Ubuntu 12.04 are still supported for about 8-9 more months. :)

 

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#9 DeimosChaos

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 08:45 AM

 

I'm sure that the 'try & see' method will land you with a Linux distro in little time. :thumbup2:

 

Unfortunately I don't even think OP will be able to find one that will work with his graphics chip. AMD has ZERO support for that card for Linux. So it seems unlikely anyone else does at the moment. Best bet is to wait for AMD to get their stuff together and support that card under *nix. 


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 02:54 AM

 

 

I'm sure that the 'try & see' method will land you with a Linux distro in little time. :thumbup2:

 

Unfortunately I don't even think OP will be able to find one that will work with his graphics chip. AMD has ZERO support for that card for Linux. So it seems unlikely anyone else does at the moment. Best bet is to wait for AMD to get their stuff together and support that card under *nix. 

 

 

This is the same game that Dell & nVidia were playing with one another over their GTX line of cards, though mainly affected those with the 970/980 models. It took a joint effort on both ends to get the issue fixed, a BIOS update by Dell & newer drivers from nVidia to settle the matter, and that took a whopping 8 months or so. They actually spent the first 3-4 months finger pointing at one another, then when both Dell & nVidia seen RMA's at alarming rates with non-stop bleeding, they set their differences aside to address the issue & all was miraculously fixed. One has to remember, with computers & a lot of hardware, there's a minimum of 30 day return (Costco provides 90 days w/no questions asked) on computers & other electronics, Newegg & other suppliers offers a 30 day return on most GPU's (restock fee may apply). Though in some instances, consumers can successfully 'appeal' restocking fees, just say that the card doesn't work with Windows 8.1 or 10, if Linux isn't in the specs, stating that it runs overly hot is plenty enough reason. 

 

I'd bet most anything that this is a two-way streak. No way could the Ubuntu developers not know that there's untold millions of computers power by AMD graphics on retail shelves & warehouses, not to mention just as many APU's & GPU's for self-build/upgrading, plus 10x as many already in use. And there's no way that AMD developers could not know that in 2016, there was going to be a new Ubuntu LTS released, though this could possibly not affect cards of the 2008-2013 era. So there's a strong chance that (like with Dell/nVidia) we have a power struggle on our hands. 

 

Who will win should AMD stick to their guns? Their loyal users, and Linux market share has actually dropped in the last couple of counts & didn't have the first thing to do with AMD, market share was dropping before 16.04 was released. I strongly doubt that AMD will 'go under' w/out Linux. On the other hand, they need to keep usershare, even if it's just 0.5% of their business & ship a custom Linux driver (they do already, yet doesn't work on 16.04). 

 

The Ubuntu developers must also compromise, and they stand to lose a lot more than AMD if not. So we're supposed to throw perfectly working GPU's in the trash can over 16.04? If so, then Linux Mint 17 will be the end of the road for me as far as Ubuntu based *nix OS's goes, the Ubuntu base isn't the only *nix game in town. I'd bet much anything that non-Ubuntu OS's will have support for current & past cards, as well as future releases. 

 

As for user recommendations, for now we have to go with the flow. Ubuntu 14.04 based OS's, which are supported through April 2019, that is, if a Ubuntu base is desired. :)

 

If not, with some shopping around, one may find a new distro that does support current & past-gen AMD/ATI cards. 

 

Note that when purchasing new computer & hardware, it's the customer's responsibility to ensure that the device/piece of hardware meets one's needs. If the OS isn't on the package, then the customer is bearing the risk that it's going to work, and sure better have a Full drive image before RMA. Returned computers are expected to have the same OS as when shipped for the purpose of returns/warranty (why I keep my main PC's HDD in the container another data drive came in). No way will all of my upgrades be shipped back to a warranty provider or even the OEM, one can kiss those upgrades goodbye. :P

 

If service is needed that I can't perform, then will place back inside what was there at time of purchase. And though my PC was purchased in 2013 & guaranteed through September 2017, this issue would had affected me also, had I kept either the stock OEM Radeon 7570, or first upgrade that's now in another Linux powered PC, an MSI branded AMD Radeon HD 7770 OC edition. Now that I have a nVidia card, can safely move to Linux Mint 18. Was considering dropping $100 for a GTX 750 Ti for the secondary Linux PC, yet the bleeding has to stop somewhere, the installed card is only 4 years old & should work. We need to draw a line in the sand & force Ubuntu to support hardware that's not obsolete & new & available in retail stores or online. 

 

Maybe 'Stand Your Ground' until a fix becomes available is a good way to put it. :)

 

We can force Ubuntu/AMD to change their ways by doing so. No one 'needs' 16.04 at this time & many doesn't need to abandon AMD (unless in time window for return). Just beat them at their own game by letting a solution fall in place, including sending emails to both sides expressing one's views in a constructive way. It will do no good to send an email full of expletives to either party, rather one in an assertive manner. 

 

Until then, there's not the first thing wrong with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS & derivative OS's, if one's hardware won't run that, well it needs replacement anyway, or an OS designed to run on it. :)

 

Cat


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#11 DeimosChaos

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 08:32 AM

Until then, there's not the first thing wrong with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS & derivative OS's, if one's hardware won't run that, well it needs replacement anyway, or an OS designed to run on it.

And there in lies the problem... the OP's GPU won't run on ANY linux. Due to the fact that AMD just has absolutely zero support for that chip at the moment. Why? Who knows... they have support for the older model, so it doesn't make a whole lot of sense as to why they don't have support for the M3xx series. It gets more complicated as well since it is a switching graphics, it has the Intel integrated chip then the AMD discrete chip. Kind of similar situation to the Nvidia switching graphics couple years ago. Someone made the bumblebee open source drivers for intel/nvidia, but I doubt anyone will do it for AMD since its only one series of cards.


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#12 cat1092

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 03:12 AM

 

 Someone made the bumblebee open source drivers for intel/nvidia, but I doubt anyone will do it for AMD since its only one series of cards.

 

 

 

 

That's why I'm hopeful, that like with nVidia, someone or a group will release a PPA to support AMD graphics on 16.04, unless a upgrade to the OS provides this. :thumbup2:

 

After all, it was done for nVidia cards for some time, to have proprietary drivers for Linux, though these still says 'open source' in the Driver Manager. Can the same be pulled off for AMD remains to be seen, yet I have no doubt that someone at least is experimenting. If one can pull this off, that person or group deserves a $10 donation from every AMD graphics user, and we are many strong (though I only have one & nVidia is my favorite). :)

 

Thinking back a bit, having nVidia support was an issue, and it required a lot of work, with a lot of assistance by members of this very forum, to get my then new out of the oven GTX 960 to run. And then about another 6-8 months to perfection, just one small line to be uncommented made the Linux Mint logo during boot & shutdown appear. Today it's much easier due to the PPA's, yet at the time it was a feat, and I have to admit, was considering sticking that AMD Radeon 7770 back into the PC & exchanging for an AMD card. 

 

I know that different folks has different experiences, and some are much more well traveled than myself, though until Ubuntu 16.04 came along, one could simply rely on an AMD card for Linux Mint, it was & still is, plug & play. 

 

Have a hunch that used nVidia cards will jump a bit in price on eBay because of 16.04, even some of the famed Fermi models. Yet in this situation, I cannot blame them, it'll be a seller's market for those not wanting to purchase a new card. Though if over $40 (my line in the sand), may as well hop onto a GTX 750 Ti, at least it's GDDR5 & some of the models are 2GB ones, though at 128 bit, that's not going to mean as much as one would think. Especially over a EVGA SC model that's 1GB GDDR5 & uses little power, a few of the GTX 750 line doesn't require a 6 pin power connector, though I prefer one, unless the PC is in a an SFF case. That's where the advantage of not having to plug in a power cable is really noticeable, as many doesn't have one to begin with. 

 

One thing that may bypass this is running 16.04 in a VM, haven't tried it, yet VM software can be freely downloaded & installed. While I prefer VMware because it's an easy to install software & all sorts of rules doesn't have to be created to attach components (one can plug in a new device while the VM is running & can attach), I realize & respect that many will stick with VirtualBox, which has more open source support. On the other hand, all one needs to do join the VMware community & ask questions. I do when needed, regardless of software/hardware used, including non-computer items. There's a forum for most any product imaginable. :thumbup2:

 

I'm going to wait this graphics issue out & see what happens, someone is going to come up with a solution, even if it has to be the open source community. :)

 

There's one word that I don't prefer to use, and that's 'impossible'. :P  Though there will be instances of this, say like running modern Linux (even 12.04/14.04 based) on a very early XP box, unless one has one of the non-PAE versions I could once link & it's gone now, though I have several ISO's of it. Still, 12.04 & derivatives will be EOL come April 2017. The day has came, one cannot pick up any old computer by the curb or sticking up from a recycle bin & run the latest Linux titles, though this was the case when I began. Of course, support wasn't as good as now, so it was a good thing that these did run with little trouble. :)

 

My recommendation for a distro based off of 14.04 stands for now, unless the user decides to go the non-Ubuntu route, that's where I have little experience & others will be in a better position to say what's supported or not. I prefer the ones based off of Ubuntu because of ease of use. This doesn't imply that's the case for everyone, say if one was raised on BSD, that person won't like Ubuntu after a day, because for starters, BSD is more secure. That's not to imply that Ubuntu & derivatives aren't secure, it's just that BSD goes the extra mile, security comes first & the rest built on top of that base. Yet there's no such thing as a bulletproof OS, though Linux based OS's are as close as it gets. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


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#13 NickAu

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 03:44 AM

I think you need to read this.

AMDGPU-PRO Driver Released for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Arch Linux .
 
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#14 cat1092

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 04:25 AM

Thanks Nick! :thumbup2:

 

Something of interest in the link of the article, going back to what I posted above. 

 

 

 

AMD Catalyst (formerly ATI Radeon Linux Display Drivers) is a free project that tries to distribute proprietary drivers for all ATI and AMD Radeon graphics cards on Linux-based operating systems.

 

This means a group stepped up to the plate & delivered the solution, in a fairly quick timeframe. :)

 

Like I also stated above, this group needs to become known, so that one can donate direct to the team, and not via a 3rd party to take a slice of the pie. :thumbup2:

 

Hopefully we'll soon know the ones who came up with a solution. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 30 June 2016 - 04:26 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 Davezor

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Posted 30 June 2016 - 06:29 AM

Okay, so is that driver compatible with my R7 M340? It says that it supports R7 series, but does it support my chip?






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